Forgotten Aircraft of Battle of Britain

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by eddie_brunette, May 30, 2008.

  1. eddie_brunette

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  2. Waynos

    Waynos Active Member

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    As well as the He 113 there were a few other 'bogeyman' planes that didn't really exist as a threat, I can recall the Messerschmitt Jaguar (in reality the Bf162 that had lost out to the Ju-88 before the war), the Focke Wulf 198, which did not exist at all and a Dornier fighter (in the Bf 110 class) which also did not exist but was christened the Do 29.

    Thumbing through these old issues is a real treat. Foe instance did you know that the B-17 can be brought down by a single hit? That is just one of the siller things to be found in these old mags :)
     
  3. Kruska

    Kruska Member

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    Why siller = silly? any aircraft even a today's modern a/c can be brought down by a single "well placed - lucky" hit.

    Why didn't the French never fly - save their MS 406's to England? This a/c could have been a good match against a 109 or wouldn't it?

    Regards
    Kruska
     
  4. Waynos

    Waynos Active Member

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    The implication in the article was that the B-17 was such a feeble aircraft, described as 'obsolete by British standards', that one hit, any hit, was all it would take to bring one down. Another flight of fancy was that Wellingtons could beat of squadrons of Bf 109's with their 'heavy defensive armament' and that if a 109 could be forced into a tight turn by an opposing fighter its wing would break off.

    Also the French did fly in combat. MS 406's, Curtiss Hawks and D520's flew in combat against the Germans until the fall of France and then against the British afterwards in Vichy squadrons. They were simply powerless to stop the German onslaught. As would Britain have been without the English Channel to hold them back.
     
  5. kool kitty89

    kool kitty89 Well-Known Member

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    And a lot of French a/c were destroyed on the ground durring the BoF.
     
  6. kool kitty89

    kool kitty89 Well-Known Member

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    That Short Sunderland incedent would have gone great with the "Long odds" epesode of Dogfights.
     
  7. Flyboy2

    Flyboy2 Member

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  8. Thorlifter

    Thorlifter Well-Known Member

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    It said this at the bottom.

    Situation: October 23, 1942 was a typical day for American troops at Esprito Santo, but for the crew of a B-17 Flying Fortress it would become a most memorable day. Early that morning the Japanese began shelling the field. Lt. Ed Loberg, a former farm boy from Wisconsin, was ordered to take his B-17 up for a reconnaissance mission to determine where the Japanese guns may be located. Not finding anything they returned to the field. The brakes failed on the B-17 upon landing, and they hit several parked Navy aircraft. Fortunately for Loberg’s crew a 100 pound bomb dislodged in the crash did not explode. Later that day the crew boarded another B-17 and went hunting out to sea. Around mid-day the crew noticed a PBY being attacked by a Kawanishi H6K “Mavis” flying boat. Diving the B-17 straight down, the Mavis and the Flying Fortress soon entered a rain squall. The windows were black with clouds and rain, and the plane was buffeted by strong winds. Emerging from the squall at low altitude into blinding sunlight the B-17 emerged only fifty feet from their adversary. Immediately every gun on both aircraft began firing in a broadside exchange reminiscent of age old sailing ship battles. Thousands of bullets criss-crossed the narrow spread of air, and the Fortress shuddered from the impact. Tracer bullets from the B-17 pelted the Mavis like darts with many ricocheting off its armor. The Mavis made a tight turn, and Loberg turned inside him to avoid the mortal sting from the Mavis’ tail guns. In and out of rain squalls this interesting dogfight continued for 45 minutes. The Mavis kept very close to the wave tops to protect is vulnerable under belly. Several times during the fight the Mavis disappeared for three of four minutes into clouds, but each time as it reemerged Loberg’s B-17 resumed the attack. Twice the B-17 passed over the H6K so close that the jagged bullet holes in the Mavis and the round glasses on its two pilots could be seen clearly. Finally, the Mavis began smoking, and the Japanese plane dropped into the sea and exploded in a large ball of flame. In the words of Ira Wolfert, a war correspondent, who was on the flight; “During the duel, the Fort that I was on, with a bullet in one of its motors, and two holes as big as Derby hats in its wings, made tight turns with half-rolls and banks past vertical. That is, it frequently stood against the sea on one wing like a ballet dancer balancing on one point, and occasionally it went over even farther than that and started lifting its belly toward the sky in desperate effort to keep the Jap from turning inside it… Throughout the entire forty-four minutes, the plane, one of the oldest being used in the war, ran at top speed, shaking and rippling all over like a skirt in a gale, so many inches of mercury being blown into its motors by the superchargers that the pilot and co-pilot, in addition to their other worries, had to keep an eye on the cowlings to watch for cylinder heads popping up through them.” Others on Loberg’s crew that day were B. Thurston the co-pilot, R Spitzer the navigator, R. Mitchell the bombadier and E. Gustafson , E. Jung, G. Holbert , E. Smith, and P. Butterbaugh who manned the guns during this unusual dogfight. Both Mitchell and Spitzer were wounded during the battle.
     
  9. kool kitty89

    kool kitty89 Well-Known Member

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  10. Flyboy2

    Flyboy2 Member

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    Haha thanks, i didn't even notice that they had the story underneath the paintings :oops: guess i'll have to go back and read some of them. That is pretty intense though
     
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