Italian light bombers and reconnaissance aircrafts

Discussion in 'Aircraft Pictures' started by gekho, Dec 8, 2011.

  1. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    Breda Ba-64

    A development of the earlier Ba.27 fighter (1932), the Ba.64 was designed in 1933 to requirements set out by the Regia Aeronautica for an aircraft able to undertake multiple roles: fighter, bomber and reconnaissance. The aircraft featured an all-metal, low-wing cantilever monoplane with a wire braced tail unit and fixed tail wheel. The open cockpit was placed well forward on the fuselage in line with the wing roots to provide an excellent field of vision down as well as forward. The headrest behind the cockpit was extended as a streamlined fairing all the way down the fuselage upper decking to the tail. Two prototypes powered by a 522 kW (700 hp) Bristol Pegasus were developed, the first as a two-seater bomber with an armament of four 7.7 mm (0.303 in) machine guns in the wings and up to 400 kg (882 lb) of bombs in racks under the wings. The second was a single-seater fighter configuration fitted with a semi-retractable main landing gear that when in its rearward retracted position, provided less drag as well as protection in case of a wheels-up landing.

    The first prototype flew in 1934 but flight tests revealed a lacklustre performance despite the use of a variable-pitch, three-blade propeller. Nonetheless, a limited production order was placed for a composite variant that combined the two-place configuration of the bomber (although a small number of single-seaters were built in the initial series) with the semi-retractable fighter landing gear. The production variant was powered by a 485 kW (650 hp) Alfa Romeo 125C and although single-seat variants were built, all the Ba.64s were converted to two-place bomber/attack aircraft with a single 7.7 mm (0.303 in) machine gun mounted in the rear cockpit. Production of the 42 Ba.64s was complete by 1936.

    Source: Breda Ba.64 | Facebook
     

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  2. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    Intended as an aeroplano di combattimento, capable of fulfilling the roles of interceptor fighter, light bomber, or reconnaissance/attack aircraft as required, the prototype Breda Ba.65 made its initial flight in September 1935. Experience in Spain indicated that the Ba.65 was suited only to the attack role, and the type served thenceforth with most of the eight squadriglie attached to the two Regia Aeronautica assault stormi (wings), the 5° and 50°. A second series of 137 aircraft was built by Breda (80) and Caproni- Vizzola (57), before production ended in July 1939. They differed from the first production batch by having Fiat A.80 engines. Six Fiat-powered Ba.65s and four more of the Gnome- Rhone-powered version were sent to the Aviazione Legionaria in Spain in 1938. Following Italy's entry into World War II in June 1940, Ba.65s were involved in the fighting in North Africa against the British. They had a low serviceability rate in desert conditions and put up an unimpressive performance, The last serviceable aircraft was lost during the British offensive in Cyrenaica in February 1941.

    A large number of the Ba.65s serving with Italian units were of two-seat configuration, with an observer/gunner in an open cockpit above the trailing edge of the wing. A smaller number of the type had a Breda L type turret, but in either case the observer/ gunner operated a single 7.7mm machine-gun. While offensive armament could theoretically comprise up to 1000kg of bombs, the load usually carried was up to 300kg in the fuselage bomb bay or, alternatively, up to 200kg on underwing racks.

    Exports included 25 Fiat-powered Ba.65 two-seaters to Iraq in 1938, two of them dual-control trainers and the remainder with Breda L turrets; 20 Ba.65s with Piaggio P.XI C. 40 engines to Chile later in the same year, 17 of them single- seaters and three dual-control trainers; and 10 Fiat-powered two-seaters with Breda L turrets to Portugal in November 1939. A single Fiatpowered production aircraft was tested with an American Pratt Whitney R-1830 engine in June 1937 in anticipation of an order from the Chinese Nationalist government, but this failed to materialize. The Iraqi Ba.65s saw limited action against the British during the 1941 insurrection in that country.

    Source: Breda Ba.65 - ground attack aircraft
     

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  3. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

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  4. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

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    Right up your alley David!
     
  5. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

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  6. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    Filippo Zappata was one of the foremost Italian aircraft designers. He worked for Cantieri Navali Trieste (CANT), for some years, but went to France in 1927 to work for Blériot. He returned to Italy at the prompting of Italo Balbo and resumed work at CANT on a series of new aircraft. The first of these was the Z.501, designed to replace the Savoia-Marchetti S.78. The prototype Z.501, was first flown in 1934 by test pilot Mario Stoppani. The aircraft had a very slim fuselage, a high parasol wing and a single wing-mounted engine nacelle. In the prototype a 560 kW (750 hp) inline Isotta-Fraschini Asso-750.RC engine was fitted, with an annular radiator that resembled a radial engine (it had no liquid cooling). The engine nacelle was extended to carry a rear-facing machine gun, while other guns were mounted in the centre fuselage and nose. All were 7.7 mm (.303 in) Breda-SAFAT. Bombs up to 640 kg/1,410 lb (4 × 160 kg/350 lb) were carried under the wings. The aerodynamic low-drag design was typical of Zapata-designed aircraft, as was the wooden construction. Production of the Z.501 began in 1935 with 24 aircraft ordered from CANT, and 30 from Aereonautica Sicula, a company in Palermo. Registration numbers started with MM.35168.

    Z.501's were used for search-and-rescue missions and anti-submarine patrols. The Z.501 was put into service with some modifications, including; turrets for the machine guns, and some reinforcement of the airframe that increased the overall weight by 500 kg (1,100 lb). The more powerful 656 kW (880 hp) Isotta-Fraschini Asso XI.RC engine was fitted, but even with an additional 97 kW (130 hp), the maximum speed dropped to 245 km/h (152 mph), cruise speed to 200 km/h (120 mph), and range to 2,400 km (1,500 mi). The first units equipped were No.141 Sqn., Eritrea, No.83 Group, Augusta, No.85, Elmas, and No.62, Spain (for operations).By the time Italy entered World War II on 10 June 1940, 202 aircraft were in service in 15 squadrons. They were used by 20 Sqn. and patrolled the Mediterranean, as well as performing air-sea rescue operations. During the short campaign against France, seven Z.501s were destroyed by a French attack on their base in Sardinia. Another crashed the next day. In July, encounters with Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm fighters and accidents claimed many Z.501s, with a total of 11 destroyed in action, while the number that were operational dropped to 77. The Z.501 operated in all theatres and 62 aircraft were lost in 1940, leaving 126, of which only 87 were operational.New orders were placed with the manufacturer Aereonautica Sicula. At the end of 1941, there were Z.501s in 15 of the 27 squadrons dedicated to naval reconnaissance. Strangely, the number of operational aircraft increased to an average of 100, rising six months later to 108 in 11 squadrons, probably due to the arrival of new aircraft. They were responsible, in collaboration with Italian ships, for the destruction of HMS Union and damaged three other submarines. But their effectiveness was limited by their bombload of only four 50 kg (110 lb) or two 160 kg (352 lb) bombs.

    By the end of 1942, there were 199 aircraft in service, 88 of which were operational. Maritime reconnaissance had at that time 290 aircraft in total. By September 1943, there were still 240 aircraft assigned to maritime reconnaissance: only 84 were Z.501s, in three squadrons, and another 11 (mixed), out of 20 in total. Only around forty aircraft were operational. Total production, 218 by CANT and 236 by Aereonautica Sicula, but 12 incomplete aircraft were captured after the invasion of Sicily. Later, Aereonautica Sicula repaired many of the ICAF aircraft. Some modifications were adopted during production, such as the removal of the nose machine gun; it was replaced by an enclosed fairing. Following Italy's surrender in 1943, a few of these flying boats continued to operate with both the Axis Aeronautica Nazionale Repubblicana and the Allied Italian Co-Belligerent Air Force.[2] After the armistice, several flew to southern Italy, including the nine aircraft of 149 Sqn with 80 persons aboard. In October, there were 16 aircraft operational in southern Italy, which dropped to 10 by May 1945. The squadrons involved were Nos 141, 147, and 183. After the war 183 Sqn. was based at Elmas with four Z.501s, and these were scrapped in 1950.
     

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  7. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    The Caproni Ca.314 was an Italian monoplane, twin-engine bomber aircraft used in World War II. Derived from the similar Ca.310, it was used for ground attack and torpedo bomber duties. It was the most extensively built Ca.310 derivative, and included bomber, convoy escort/maritime patrol, torpedo bomber, and ground-attack versions.
     

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  8. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

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  9. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    The Ca.313 was designed by Cesare Pallavicino. The prototype first flew on 22 December 1939. It was developed as a replacement of the Caproni Ca.311. To save development time, the first Ca.313 was simply a modified Ca.310 with new engines. The final Ca.313 design was similar to the Ca.311 with inline engines. These engines, IF Delta RC 35 inverted V-12s, had a smaller frontal profile than the Piaggio P.VII C.35 radial engines they replaced. Due to the resulting lower aerodynamic drag, the Ca.313 was capable of more speed for the same power. Given the fact that 626 kW (840 hp) Fiat A.38 radial engines were needed for front-line fighters, there was no other choice for this aircraft. The Ca.313 had a glassed-in nose, similar to the Heinkel He 111. This Caprioni, with its characteristic 'Z' hubs, engines mounted in the wings and retractable undercarriage, was of mixed construction, i.e. metal in the fuselage and wood in the wings. Bomb load and defensive armament were typical of the time. The aircraft could carry 400 kg (880 lb) of bombs. Three 7.7 mm (0.303 in) Breda (or Scotti) machine guns were fitted - one in the left wing, one in a dorsal turret and one in the ventral position. The main customer was the Regia Aeronautica (Italian Air Force), but many aircraft were ordered by other countries. France ordered 200 machines and Great Britain 300. Of these 500, only five Ca.313F units were delivered to France before Italy's entry into World War II.

    Source: Caproni Ca.313 | Facebook
     

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  10. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    The Storch was first flown in 1936. Using a fixed slat over the leading edge of the wing and slotted camber-changing flaps along the trailing edge, the Storch achieved incredible short take-off performance. In a light breeze the Storch could take off in just 200 feet (60 meters) and land in about 66 feet (20 meters). It had a crew of three, and with extensive windows surrounding the occupants, made an excellent observation and liaison aircraft. Production for the German armed forces began with the Fi 156A-1. The Fi 156C, which had the rear glazing raised to accommodate a machine gun for defense, soon replaced the A-1. Other variants included a tropical version with dust filters, an ambulance version carrying a single stretcher, and an enlarged version (Fi 256) with seating for five built in limited numbers in France between 1943 and 1944. Fieseler began building the Storch in Germany, but was soon forced to move production to Morane-Saulnier in France (as the M.S.500 Criquet) and Mraz in Czechoslovakia (as the K-65 Cap). This was done to make room for the BF 109 at the Fieseler plant.

    The Fieseler Storch was the last dogfight victim of the western front. Pilot Duanes Francies and his observer, Lieutenant William Martin, of the 5th US Army Division, spotted a Storch circling below them while looking for ground targets in their Piper Cub. Diving on the Storch, the two men opened fire with their Colt .45s and the plane spiraled to the ground. After a short gun battle, Francies and his observer took the two Germans into custody. Lt. Martin was awarded the Air Medal for his part in the fight, but Francies would have to wait until the story was reported in Cornelius Ryan's book "The Last Battle," to finally be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. The USAF was 22 years late. Apart from being the last Luftwaffe plane lost in the west, this Storch was also the only enemy plane downed by pistol fire during the war.

    Source: Warbird Alley: Fieseler Storch

    For further information: ItalBooks.com
     

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  11. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

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  12. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    The RS.14 was designed by Manlio Stiavelli at the CMASA works at Marina di Pisa. The first of two prototypes flew in May 1939. A prototype landplane version AS.14 was built and first flown on 11 August 1943. It was designed as a ground-attack aircraft and intended to be armed with a 37 mm (1.46 in) cannon and 12.7 mm (0.5 in) machine guns. It was not ordered and no others were built. The RS.14 went into service with the Italian Air Force with a number of maritime strategic reconnaissance squadrons at bases around the Italian coast and also in Sicily and Sardinia. They were used for convoy escort duties and anti-submarine patrols. After the 1943 Armistice a few survivors were operated by the Italian Co-Belligerent Air Force. At the end of the war the aircraft were used for liaison duties around the Mediterranean carrying up to four passengers.
     

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  13. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    The Caproni Ca.311 was a light bomber-reconnaissance aircraft produced in Italy prior to and during World War II. It was a member of the large family of Caproni designs derived from the Ca.306 airliner prototype of 1935, and more directly a modification of the Ca.310 bomber. As with other related types, it was a low-wing cantilever monoplane of conventional design. This particular design incorporated the Ca.310's retractable main undercarriage, as well as the heavily-glazed nose that had been tested on the Ca.310bis prototype. New features included a relocation of the dorsal turret to a position immediately aft of the cockpit, and additional glazing throughout the fuselage. From 1940, this aircraft began to replace the IMAM Ro.37 in service, completing this process the following year.

    Source: Caproni Ca.311 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     

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  14. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

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  15. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    #15 gekho, Dec 12, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2012
    The Ro.43 was designed to meet a 1933 requirement of the Regia Marina (or Italian Navy), for a catapult launched reconnaissance aircraft to equip the Maritime Reconnaissance Squadrons operating from its ships. The specifiation called for a speed of 240 km/h (149 mph), with a range of 600 km (370 mi) or an endurance of 5.5 h. Other contenders were the Piaggio P.18 and P.20, CSAMA MF.10, CANT Z.504 and Macchi C.76. Derived from the Ro.37 Lince reconnaissance aircraft, with the same designer, the Ro.43 first flew in 1934. The plane was built with steel tubes and wood covered by a soft alloy and fabric. It was a two-seat biplane with folding gulled upper and inverse gull lower wings, lightly armed and capable of around 300 km/h (185 mph) and over 1000 km (620 mi) range. This performance more than met the requirements of the specification, and so the seaplane made by IMAM was declared the winner. Despite this, the Ro.43 had serious problems. Its lightweight structure meant that it was too delicate for buoyancy at sea, and it had poor sea-handling qualities. These problems meant that when it was launched it was quite normal not to recover it at sea, forcing the aircraft to return to land before alighting.

    The aircraft's good endurance meant that the seaplanes could still be useful in the constrained Mediterranean. Six Ro.43 launched from light cruisers played a role in spotting the British fleet during the battle of Calabria, in the opening rounds of the war. One of them, departing from the cruiser Eugenio di Savoia, kept visual contact with the battleship HMS Warspite during the exchange of fire between the British capital ship and the Italian battleship Giulio Cesare before being chased off by a Sea Gladiator from the carrier HMS Eagle. Near the end of 1940, a lone Ro.43 launched by the heavy cruiser Bolzano was the first to spot the British fleet at the beginning of the battle of Cape Spartivento, at 9:45 while the seaplane of Gorizia located the British convoy at 11:45. British Skuas from the carrier HMS Ark Royal claimed to have shot down one of the seaplanes after a fruitless bombing on the Italian fleet, purportedly from the battleship Vittorio Veneto. The performance of the Ro.43s in this battle was eulogized by the Italian supreme command. Another Ro.43 launched by Vittorio Veneto pinpointed the British cruiser squadron at 6:35 during the engagement near Gavdos island, the prelude of the Battle of Matapan, on 28 March 1941.

    A cruiser-borne Ro.43 signaled the presence of the British convoy by dropping flares during the Second Battle of Sirte, while another seaplane from the battleship Littorio directed the fire of the Italian fleet on the British squadron before disengaging at 17:24. The Ro.43s continued to take part in shipborne operations as late as June 1942, during the Italian cruiser attack on the Harpoon convoy. One of the Italian seaplanes was shot down by a Bristol Beaufighter from Malta in the course of this action. One hundred five aircraft were in service at the start of World War II, more than enough to equip the major surface units of the Italian Navy, but soon a better aircraft was requested, possibly a navalized fighter. This resulted in a small series being built of a naval version of the Reggiane Re.2000 that could be catapulted but was not fitted with floats so had to either return to a land base or ditch, in a similar fashion to the Hawker Hurricanes operated by British CAM ships. The best feature were the folding wings, but even so the maximum carried on board was usually two. This, together with the modest possibilities of recovery and the lack of experience with naval aviation (even though the Italian Navy possessed a seaplane carrier, the Giuseppe Miraglia) limited the use of the aircraft in combat. Around 200-240 were produced until 1941, with 48 still in service in 1943 .
     

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  16. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    In its brief but spectacular career the dive bomber has earned itself a unique place in the pages of aeronautical history. However no other aircraft has typified the terror wrought by these aircraft as did the Ju87 Stuka. Perhaps understanding early the limitations of the dive bomber, the Regia Aeronautica (RA) never fully committed itself to the development of the dive bomber, choosing instead to devote its resources to the development of conventional ground attack aircraft and strategic bombers such as the Piaggio P.108, Cant. 1007 and Cant.1018. However, with the rapid German successes in France and Poland and seeing a need for the pinpoint accuracy of the dive bomber in place of level bombing (in support of its navy), the Regia Aeronautica turned to the Ju87. It is interesting to note that neither Britain, France or Russia developed a successful dive bomber while the US, Japan and Germany each featured one. However the Ju87 stands alone as the only successful land based dive bomber. No other country outside of Germany has gained as much notoriety in the use of this aircraft as did the Italians. Seeing that the number of Ju 87s avaiable could not reach the prescribed numbers needed to put into effect the tactics of the Luftwaffe, the Italians developed the skip bombing technique well before its use in the Pacific war. Italian dive bomber groups were called Bombardamento di Picchiata (Dive Bomber Group) and hence Picchatello (Dive Bomber).

    Source: Junkers Ju 87R-2 Picchiatello by Vince Tassone (Airfix 1/48)
     

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  17. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

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    I've never heard of that one.
     
  18. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    A contest was held by the Regia Aeronautica for a light reconnaissance aircraft and a heavier aeroplane. The first should have 350 km/h (190 knots/220 mph) maximum speed, five hours endurance, three machine-guns and a bomblets dispenser, armour, and the capability to operate from improvised airfields. The heavier one should have 325 km/h maximum speed, at least 1,300 km (810 mi) endurance, 7,000 m (22,750 feet) ceiling, climb to 5,000m (16,000) in 19 minutes, three crew, five weapons, high wing and other details. Limited production of the IMAM Ro.30, an improved Ro.1 with a defensive turret and better engine, resulted. It was rejected by the Regio Esercito and not chosen for production, being only capable of 200 km/h (110 knots), five hours endurance, a climb rate of 4,000 m (13,000 feet) in 20 minutes, and had three weapons. IMAM did not give up after the modest success of the Ro.30 and so designed a new aircraft, the Ro.37, which first flew in 1933. This was a biplane aircraft of mixed construction, with two seats, and a 560 hp Fiat A.30 inline engine. It reached 300 km/h (162 knots) and perhaps even more with this engine, the same as that of the Fiat CR.32. The Ro.37 had a 7,000 m ceiling, 3,000 m climb in 11 minutes, over 1,200 km (750 mi) endurance, three machine guns (two in the nose and one dorsal), twelve 15 kg bombs, and good agility. It was similar to the Hawker Hind, rather than a light army aircraft, and its performance was similar to the later Westland Lysander, but the contemporary British design was the Hawker Hector. The Ro.37 was later fitted with the 600 hp Piaggio P.IX radial engine. The better reliability of this engine was considered more desirable and so this was the main version produced.

    103 Squadron was equipped in mid-1935 and swiftly employed in Ethiopia. In December this unit was sent to Somalia, and eventually another four squadrons went to this theatre: 105, 108, 109, and 110 Squadrons, for a total of ten Ro.37 and forty-one Ro.37Bis. With the end of operations, 110 Squadron remained in the theatre, deployed in counterinsurgency tasks and serving as reinforcement for isolated garrisons. In the meantime, the R.37 also served in the Spanish Civil War, with the first ten arriving in late 1936. Another 26 (possibly 58) went to this theatre and were used for many missions and tasks. They were used as assault aircraft, even though they were unarmoured. The results were satisfactory and some were even converted to a single-seat machine for use as attack fighters. The two-seat versions were used as heavy fighters, providing protection for S.81 bombers from Republican I-15s. It is not known if there were any air-to-air victories. The Ro.37 was generally liked by pilots, and the only complaint was that aircraft was prone to damage to the undercarriage, and had some engine faults. The aircraft was produced until 1939 with a total of 569 (237 + 332bis) produced, and as late as 1940 there were provisions to have 17 Squadron equipped with this machine. In fact, the Ro.37 continued to be used as reconnaissance aircraft for years, since its replacement, the Caproni Ca.311, proved unsatisfactory. Ro.37 were also quite widely exported (ten to Uruguay, sixteen to Afghanistan, fourteen to Hungary, eight to Austria, and one to Ecuador) and around 280 were in service in 1940, in thirty squadrons consisting of 215 aircraft. Some were in service up to 1943 and perhaps even later. They were very vulnerable, but in the war Italy did not have sufficient resources to produce a better observation aircraft, not even the Ro.63, a superior aircraft, similar to the Storch, but with more endurance.
     

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  19. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    #19 gekho, Dec 13, 2011
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2011
    Developed in parallel with the Ghibli, the Caproni Bergamaschi Ca 310 Libeccio (south west wind) was structurally similar to the earlier machine, but was provided with retractable landing gear and powered by two 470-hp (350-kW) Piaggio P.VII C.35 radial engines. The prototype, which was flown for the first time on 20 February"1937, had two 460-hp (343-kW) P.VII C.16 engines. A total of 161 production Ca 310s was delivered to the Regia Aeronautica between 1937 and 1939, including 10 destined originally for Romania. Export deliveries went to Norway (4), Peru (16) and Yugoslavia (12), and this last nation also acquired 12 more under the designation Ca 310bis; this variant, built at Caproni's Taliedo factory, differed primarily by having an unstepped extensively-glazed nose. The designation Ca 310 Idro applied to an experimental civil version with twin floats, but this did not enter production.

    The prototype of the Ca310bis served as a development aircraft for the following Ca 311; the first of 320 built for the Regia Aeronautica was flying on 1 April 1939. As built they were similar to the Ca 310bis, but most were later modified by the introduction of a stepped windscreen, then being redesignated Ca 311M. Defensive armament of this version comprised a Caproni Lanciani turret with a single 7.7-mm (0.303-in) machine-gun, complemented by one machine-gun in the port wing root and another firing aft through a ventral hatch. Yugoslavia ordered 15 Ca 311s, of which five were delivered to the Royal Yugoslav air force in 1941 and 10 to the Croatian air force in 1942. These were followed by the Ca 312, for which the original Ca 310 prototype and one production example served as development aircraft, powered by 650-hp (485-kW) Piaggio P.XVI RC.35 engines with three-blade propellers. The Norwegian government ordered 15 with the designation Ca 312bis, these having an unstepped, glazed forward fuselage similar to that of the Ca 311, but the German invasion of Norway took place before they could be delivered. The Norwegian aircraft were then diverted for service with the Regia Aeronautica, as were 24 intended originally for the Royal Belgian air force. A modified Ca 310 with two Isotta-Fraschini Asso 120 IRCC 40 engines served as the Ca 313 prototype, first flown on 22 December 1939, but France had already confirmed an order for 200 of these aircraft on 1 October, followed closely by British and Sweden orders for 300 and 64 respectively. However, Italy's entry into the war prevented delivery of any of the British machines and France received only five Ca 313F models, the remainder being diverted to the Regia Aeronautica. Delivery of the first Ca 313S to Sweden was made during November 1940, and a total of 84 had been supplied by early 1941. These received the Swedish designations D 16, S 16, T 16 and Tp 16S, identifying bomber, maritime reconnaissance, torpedo bomber and transport versions respectively. Initial production aircraft were basically Ca 311s with 730-hp (544-kW) Isotta-Fraschini Delta RC.35 I-DS engines, these being identified by the designation Ca 313 RP.B.1, but a stepped cockpit was a feature of the Ca 313 RP.B.2, of which 122 were built for the Regia Aeronautica. Ca 313 production totalled 271, this including only a small number of the 905 Ca 313G communications/trainer aircraft ordered for the Luftwaffe, which were not completed because of Caproni's heavy involvement in development and production programmes.

    Most extensively built version was the Ca 314, for which the first three production Ca313 RP.B.2s, with revised armament, served as prototypes. Variants included the Ca 314A or Ca 314-SC (Scorta), a convoy escort/maritime patrol aircraft, the Ca 314B or Ca314RA (Ricognizione Aerosiluranti) torpedo-bomber with a l,894-lb (900 kg) torpedo or a bombload of one l,l02-lb (500-kg) or two 551-lb (250-kg) bombs, and the ground-attack Ca 314C which carried two additional 12.7-mm (0.5-in) Breda-SAFAT machine-guns beneath the wing roots. Production of this version comprised Ca 314A (73), Ca 314B (80) and Ca 314C (134) built at Toliedo, plus 60 Ca 314Cs built at Ponte San Pietro, and a further 60 Ca 314s manufactured by AVIS at Castellamare di Stabia.

    Source: Caproni Bergamaschi Ca 310 series
     

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