Resin parts build help

Discussion in 'Building Questions, Tutorials and Guidebooks' started by s1chris, Aug 13, 2013.

  1. s1chris

    s1chris Member

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    Hello, could somebody steer me in the right direction for building resin kits please?
    I had a quick search of the sub forum but nothing has come up.

    Challenge number one is for me to build my 1/72 Extratech DB603 for my Me410.

    Questions are -

    what tools are best to cut the and trim the resin from the sprue?
    What adhesive is best for resin kits?

    Thanks Chris
     
  2. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Chris, do you mean resin kits, as in a full kit of an aircraft, or resin accessories?
    I'm guessing, by mentioning the engine, you mean the latter.
    To remove the parts from the casting block, use a razor saw, slowly and carefully. Any remaining excess resin can be carefully removed with a new blade in the scalpel, and then, if needed, very gently sanded with fine wet n' dry.
    Beware of the resin dust - ensure you don't inhale it!
    Use CA (Superglue) to fit the parts, having first checked and adjusted fit as required.
    Wash the parts in a mild solution of warm water and washing-up liquid, rinsing off thoroughly in clean water before use. A decent undercoat will probably be required before painting, and enamels are best for this.
     
  3. s1chris

    s1chris Member

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    Thanks Terry, so that's a bottle of Zap and a razor saw on order tomorrow.
    Yeah, at the minute it's just the accessorie. I have the engine and when I get around to building the model, a P-47 ASR resin kit for the underside of Galloping Catastrophe.

    Eventually I will need to build a whole resin kit of a 1/48 Blackburn Botha.

    Cheers Chris
     
  4. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    I guess someone has to have a Botha!!
     
  5. s1chris

    s1chris Member

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    Believe me, I never intended to have a Botha but I "accidentally" purchased some harness buckle relics from
    Botha L6262. So I now have to model it.
     
  6. N4521U

    N4521U Well-Known Member

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    There are a couple of types of CA I use, medium and thin.

    If the parts mating surfaces are really flat and true, like flat PE parts to plastic, thin will work well. If they are a bit rough, like resin to resin in some cases, I use the medium. You'll have to do some experimenting with the CA. There will be plenty of the "sprue" or base materials to cut parts from, sand or file the surfaces and glue to see how the CA acts. Sometimes they slip apart if you don't hold them together. AND, when they set, They Are Set! The CA can be filed or sanded to finish the seam so don't worry over glue seeping from seams.

    If you get it on your skin it's not a big deal. It's kinda therapeutic to peel it off. If you get it between fingers or somewhere else, finger nail polish remover will get them free.

    A drop of the medium will take a bit longer to set as well. Use drops from the end of a pointed thingy, not the tube! I use a piece of thin wire about 40mm long stuck in the end of a 10mm diam wood dowel, with a loop about 1mm in diam. in the end. I put CA in the loop, then touch it to one of the parts mating surfaces and stickem together. You have to be Ready, if the glue CA sets, if you haven't learned to swear by now, you will soon after. The loop will become a bulb of CA, but just put a match to the bulb and burn it off and it will be as clean as.

    You'll be okay.
     
  7. fubar57

    fubar57 Well-Known Member

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    Though I've never used it, I've heard 5 minute two part epoxy works well and gives you a longer working time before it sets.

    Geo
     
  8. s1chris

    s1chris Member

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    The epoxy could be a safe bet, especially with something so small as a 1/72 engine.
    Some of the parts are so small I think I may need a microscope to fit them.
     
  9. N4521U

    N4521U Well-Known Member

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    Depends on how thick the epoxy gets, it could devour your part! And it will dry up between parts!

    And........ you do need 4x glasses, and a magnifier lamp to work with some of the parts.... and This is not a joke!
    It's my set-up! And fine pointed tweezers. And I use a black T-shirt pulled tight over my cutting bord so parts don't bounce onto the bl00dy carpeted floor!!!!! And I keep my fowl language dictionary handy!

    just sayin.
     
  10. Rogi

    Rogi Active Member

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    +1 The "Potty Mouth" Rosetta stone lessons are fantastic, they let you learn 30 fowl language phrases in no time. Extra handy for anything 1/72 and smaller that gets lost :D :)
     
  11. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    I save my energy - I have a large, red button on the side of my desk. Press it, and a loud "**** it !" can be heard over the speakers!!!
     
  12. s1chris

    s1chris Member

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    I have one of them, but I had kids with it! Sometimes you don't even need to press the button.
     
  13. s1chris

    s1chris Member

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    Added to the shopping list, much appreciated.
     
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