Stuff you wish someone had told you as a rookie!

Discussion in 'Modeling' started by seiseki, Dec 12, 2010.

  1. seiseki

    seiseki Member

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    #1 seiseki, Dec 12, 2010
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2010
    Hi!
    I've recently gotten into scale modeling and I'm currently building a 1:48 A6M3 Zero, but I also have an unfinished 1:48 Sopwith Camel lying around.

    I'm curious about what stuff you wish someone had told or taught you about.
    So, let the advice flow, it can be anything from tools, techniques, materials etc.

    I can start with one thing I've experienced so far.

    1. If you have cats, don't let model parts lie around on your workbench for too long, or you might find that they're completely gone when you need them.
    Like the engine cover for my Sopwith Camel.. >.<
     
  2. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

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    #2 vikingBerserker, Dec 12, 2010
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2010
    Children too :lol:

    The one thing I really wished I had been told was to take my time.
     
  3. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    Also wives... they are of a bad feature of coming and disturbing when modelling. :lol:
     
  4. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    Nooo kidding!? :rolleyes: :lol:
     
  5. T Bolt

    T Bolt Well-Known Member

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    I think the single biggest thing I learned along the way was the proper way to do decals. Paint, Future gloss coat, decals, more Future to seal the decals, and then Dullcoat. Made a world of difference in my modeling.
     
  6. seiseki

    seiseki Member

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    I haven't gotten to the part with decals yet, but whats so special about them?
    What difference does the gloss coat make?
     
  7. N4521U

    N4521U Well-Known Member

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    They need a smooth "non-porous" surface to lay flat to. I'ts Future floor polish. Apply it with an artists "fan" type synthetic bristle brush. Not a real dense one about 1/2 -3/4" across. Very light coat applied evenly, you don't want it to puddle when applied or it will dry in dark spots. So pull it around as you apply it. The use one of them girly eye shadow applicators to apply decal solvent to soften the decal and allow you to position them "exactly" where you want them. Nothing looks worse than milky white decals!
     

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  8. seiseki

    seiseki Member

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    ah, thanks for the info!

    Decal solvent, do I apply that after I've placed the decal on the model?
     
  9. N4521U

    N4521U Well-Known Member

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    Wet the decal on the sheet, one at a time, slide the decal off the backing paper onto the model surface. While still wet, dip the dauber into the solvent, and gently wet the top surface with the solvent. You can slide the decal around the surface like this. The decal will "soften" a bit, it can tear easily now so be gentle. When it is in place, make sure everything is level or it may move on its own. Squeeze out the dauber, then pat off some of the liquid, but Not till dry. The decal will conform to most dips and undulations. Liquid will evaporate and the decal will be solid in place. A little more future over the decal when dry will lock it in place. Practice one somewhere. The steps are easy and flow nicely together. Easy peasy.
     
  10. mikewint

    mikewint Well-Known Member

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    Amen, on the decal info, I'm a long way from a rookie but none of this as around when I started so I'm learning ll this stuff too. do it right and the "decal" won't look like a decal, it will look like paint.
    Other than that, learning to use an airbrush makes a world of difference in your models appearence
     
  11. seiseki

    seiseki Member

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    Went to my local scale modeling hobby store and bought two bottles of something that the clerk said were used for decals..
    Something called 'micro set' and 'micro sol'..

    I'm sure getting that floor polish would have been cheaper but I'm lazy..

    So what are the actual hard parts of modeling, where do most people screw up?
    I haven't finished a model yet so I'm kinda curious.
    The only thing that worries me at the moment is if scratches from sanding will show up after painting and I'm also scared of painting over the panel lines..
     
  12. Thorlifter

    Thorlifter Well-Known Member

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    If you have glue on your fingers, don't touch the clear parts
     
  13. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    Micro Set and Micro Sol liquids allow to apply decals fitting them to a surface. However using of these liquids doesn't mean a painted matt surface will let them settle down correctly. The effect of incorrect applying is called "silvering" because these decal areas of the clear background seem to be more matt and "milky" than the painted matt surface. Therefore we use clear coat for making a surface smooth and more solid.

    Sanding is one of the most annoying works on models for most of people. But it is not as frustrating as it seems. For major sanding should be used sandpaper of 600-800 grade. Then one of 1200-1500 grade. Also it is better if the sandpaper can be used for wet sanding ( with water). Following the way lets get a smooth matt surface without any scratches clearly seen. The next step is the re-freshing of all panel lines and rivet ones.
    The final work starts with gentle sanding with sandpaper of 2000 grade and removing of all dirt and dust with a brush of soft hairs. Then polishing with soft rag, toothpaste or other compounds for polishing. Personally I use common newspaper. When all is made properly scratches aren't seen at all. However all metalizers and silver ( aluminium ) paints make them noticable. That's why we have to use primers additionally.
     
  14. JohnAnthony

    JohnAnthony Member

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    Start practicing your skills on cheap kits. You can learn from your mistakes on a $10 kit just as well as on a $50 kit. Save the expensive stuff for when you know what you're doing. (Unless you're rich of course, in which case...nevermind.)
     
  15. mikewint

    mikewint Well-Known Member

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    Rather than sandpaper, i use fingernail (emery) boards. they come in various "grits" much like sandpaper and they are fairly rigid. There are also very fine foam "boards" for buffing or shining the nails
     
  16. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    I agree with the post above. These "tools" can come in handy too. But these aren't for "wet" sanding.So the work on surfaces might take more time.
     
  17. T Bolt

    T Bolt Well-Known Member

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    You put on a coat of Future before the decals to give the surface a gloss coat, than after letting the Future dry for a couple of days, you put the decals on with the setting solution. Don't use Micro Set with Future though, it causes a reaction that turns the Future milky color, but Micro Sol is OK. Also any mistakes with the Future can be removes with Windex which acts as a solvent for it.
     
  18. mikewint

    mikewint Well-Known Member

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    Don't know about where you live but around here you cannot find "future". It now says Pledge Floor Polish and in small logo type on the bottom right "with future shine". the plastic bottle is clear and the liquid looks like water.
     
  19. seiseki

    seiseki Member

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    I live in Sweden, not sure where I'd go to look for this 'future' stuff..

    I've got vallejo matt and glossy varnish though, does that work?
    And do I have to coat the entire model or just the surface where the decals will be applied?

    Could anyone post some pics of milky decals compared to properly applied decals?

    Thanks for all the tips so far, this really helps as I will soon be applying decals to the instruments in cockpit of my zero..
     
  20. mikewint

    mikewint Well-Known Member

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    Future is essentially a clear acrylic (water soluble) In Sweden it should be sold as pictured below
     

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