Weathering pre-colored photo-etch parts?

Discussion in 'Weathering Questions, Tutorials and Guidebooks' started by proton45, Sep 14, 2012.

  1. proton45

    proton45 Member

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    Hello...I have been getting back into modeling again (after a few years absent) and I have a little question in regards to the weathering (or aging...showing use) of the beautiful pre-colored cockpit photo etch parts. These photo etch pieces are so beautifully done but they (kind of) look too good...I feel that they would show some wear and tare from use.

    I'm just looking for a few tried and true techniques to try...has anyone experience with "aging" these parts? Silver pens (ever tried them?) How about washes (enamel or acrylic)? I know the basic places I could start, but before I screw up these nicely pre-colored ( expensive) photo etch cockpit parts, I thought that I would check and see if anyone has any techniques that they have had good luck with...

    I'm trying to show battle wear and use....thanks
     
  2. Crimea_River

    Crimea_River Well-Known Member

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    Never done this myself but if you want a chipped paint look,suggest just scratching the coating surface with a blade down to the bare metal
     
  3. proton45

    proton45 Member

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    No one modifies these pre-colored photo etch parts? They looks so new and perfect...I would just feel safer trying a technique that someone has had good luck with. Scrapping away paint is a nice idea (to show wear), but most certainly is permanent solution. Dry brushing or a (weathering) wash add a nice "shadow" relief...depth to the cockpit panel, when I'm painting a part from scratch. IDK...I don't wanna mess up these nice parts, but they looks so perfect (lol)...

    If anyone has any thoughts it could be a help....thanks
     
  4. fubar57

    fubar57 Well-Known Member

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    Maybe try and weather using chalk pastels. If you don't like the effect, you can wash it off. I've just bought some Citadel washes. With an 000 brush, they are very subtle.

    Geo
     
  5. proton45

    proton45 Member

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    @fubar57....thanks, I dont know why I didn't think of that. I have never really experimented with pastel chalk before but I have heard of them.
    They might be exactly what the doctor ordered...thanks again.
    :eating: :coffee:
     
  6. Rogi

    Rogi Active Member

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    I do it, a lot actually (whenever I get the kit) I usually use oils or acrylic metal paints to show wear and tear. I'll explain further after a bit of eats (wait for a Ninja edit)
     
  7. proton45

    proton45 Member

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    Thanks Rogi...I'm intrigued, enjoy your eats.
     
  8. KoJo

    KoJo Member

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    I like to use washes to dirty up PE parts. Also masking off certain spots and using aluminum paint to create chipping effect by using part of a scotch bright pad in the same effect of dry brushing but dab instead of brush.
     
  9. Rogi

    Rogi Active Member

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    #9 Rogi, Sep 28, 2012
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2012
    I forgot where the thread was sorry, I'll take some pics and then post. I've book marked this thread now so I shouldn't lose it again, sorry :D

    Ok just a simple FAQ for now, its started to rain heavy and its not a good time to take photos atm so I'll explain the procedure.

    You'll get a Clear Color like Clear Yellow X-24 you can dilute or keep it as is, when I use it I usually keep it as is and gently dry brush onto the photo etch parts, it gives it a "older" look to it.

    Once your satisfied you can either add other clear colors (orange, black etc) or you can start to gently dry brush flat auminium onto whichever section of the photo etch you'd like to appear worn out. The cool thing is, if you apply too much you can remove with a bit of water and then re-apply. If you try the same thing with a scotch pad or scrap it off, you might not like how it ends up and then you'll have to apply a fix to the panel.

    Hope that helped some what

    Igor
     
  10. proton45

    proton45 Member

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    That's interesting...I tried adding a "yellow'ish" tint to some of the etch parts, I was trying to give it an "aged look".
     
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