"Whirlwind" by Niall Corduroy

Discussion in 'Non-fiction' started by vikingBerserker, Aug 26, 2013.

  1. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

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    "Whirlwind"
    by Niall Corduroy
    Fonthill - 2013
    ISBN 978-1-78155-037-3

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    Being a fighter that always interested me, when this book was announced in 2012 I jumped at pre-ordering it. After numerous delays the book was FINALLY printed and shipped this month and I have to say it was well worth the wait.

    The book is 240 pages long divided into 14 Chapters, 3 Appendices, a section for Endnotes, and 70 pictures. The book traces the beginning of the program to production orders/cancelations, though individual unit operations until the last one was scrapped in 1951. It actually lists the history of each individual aircraft built. The book is well written and does a great job of presenting the facts of the aircraft - it's faults as well as it's strengths.

    The only bad thing I can say about the book is in regards to the pictures. There was only 1 interior shot and that was of the instrument panel and there were very few detail shots of the rest of the aircraft (though there is an interesting picture of Westland's design for a 12 x MG nose for a pre-Whirlwind design). If you wanted a book with lots of details for building a model then this is probably not a good book for you. If you are just interested in the history of the aircraft, then this book is perfect.

    I gave it a sold 9 Rolls Royce Peregrines.
     
  2. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Thanks for the review David, sounds like an interesting read.
    There never did seem to be many photos of the Whirlwind, compared to other types, and it may be that it was regarded as 'secret' at the time, even when operational. Photography in general, other than 'official' photos, was banned on military establishments - even though 'private' snaps were taken - so if the 'Whirlwind' was given a higher security rating, then I'd guess the rules were enforced more than usual?
     
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