10 Songs from the Old Folks

Discussion in 'Music' started by Njaco, Dec 18, 2007.

  1. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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    Adler's thread "10 Songs To Listen" was great for me as I've lost touch alittle of the music scene. But I was thinking that maybe it could go the opposite way. How many younger members of the board know how great Zeppelin was or how fantastic Queen or Bowie or Aerosmith pre-1985 were? So I decided to start a thread with the greatest 10 songs from the Dinosaur age of Rock starting with Led Zeppelin. Anybody else can add as some bands I wasn't into (like the Stones). The first list is for Udet.

    10 Songs to Listen to from:

    Led Zeppelin
    (I've tried to stay away from the obvious - Stairway to Heaven, Kashmir, Immigrant Song, Whole Lotta Love, etc.)

    Vocals - Robert Plant
    Guitar - Jimmy Page
    Bass - John Paul Jones
    Drums - John Bonham

    Achilles Last Stand - studio album 'Presence' released by Swan Song Records on March 31, 1976. The album was recorded within three weeks at Musicland Studios in Munich, Germany, with Plant in a wheelchair. Both Page and Plant had planned the album to be a return to a simple spontaneous affair after the complex arrangements on 'Houses of the Holy' and 'Physical Graffiti'. It is their only studio album that features neither acoustic tracks nor keyboards. This is one of the longest Led Zeppelin songs. It runs 10:26. Jimmy Page overdubbed 6 guitar tracks to create a huge sound. 'Achilles Last Stand' stands as one of the bands most powerful epics.

    Ten Years Gone - 'Physical Graffiti' double album released on February 24, 1975 and was the band's first release on their own Swan Song Records label. Robert Plant wrote the lyrics about a girlfriend who made him choose between her and his music 10 years earlier. She got the boot. This was written as an instrumental. Plant added the lyrics. The guitar overdubs are insane on this track! Even one or two notes at the right time show that Page was a much better producer than guitarist. And he was a great guitarist.

    Good Times, Bad Times - 'Led Zeppelin I', released on January 12, 1969 was the first album by Led Zeppelin. It's a solid, classic hard rocking tune, with a slight bluesy touch. John Paul Jones' and his bass here really must be heard to be appreciated. Jimmy Page passed his guitar through a Leslie Speaker to create a swirling effect. The Leslie contains a rotating paddle and was designed for organs, but some musicians used it to process guitars and vocals. “Good Times Bad Times” explodes out of the gate with a remarkable rhythm from John Bonham and a group sound that felt like a tightly wound coil ready to rip loose.

    Bring It On Home - 'Led Zeppelin II' was released October 22, 1969 and recorded between January and August 1969 at various studios. The groundbreaking album was instrumental in defining the sound of hard rock. This song was influenced by a song of the same name by Blues great Sonny Boy Williamson and has a real 'hit the road' feel to it. Plant's masked vocals at the start are unusual but effective and the song on the whole is energetic. Led Zeppelin frequently performed this live, with interplay between Jimmy Page's guitar, John Bonham's drums and John Paul Jones's bass.

    Friends / Celebration Day - 'Led Zeppelin III', the third album by Led Zeppelin, was released October 5, 1970. "Friends" is one of a few Led Zeppelin songs that used strings. Bass player John Paul Jones did the arrangement. It has been closely referenced to Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young's "Carry On." If you listen, the first part of the song is almost exactly identical to this song. "Celebration Day" was almost left off the album. The beginning of the master tape was kinked and wouldn't play in the tape machine. It was cut out and the ending synthesizer of "Friends" was composited over the edit to disguise it.

    When The Levee Breaks - The fourth album, variously referred to as 'Led Zeppelin IV', was released on November 8, 1971 . Based on a 1929 recording of the same name by Blues artist Memphis Minnie. Bonham's opening drum sequence, full of energy, has become the most sampled drum sequence of all time and it makes a foreboding start to the song. Plant's vocals are assured and the mouthorgan part in the song adds a unique eeriness to the music. The distinctive drum sound was created by setting up drums in the hallway of Headley Grange, where they were living and recording. They set up 2 overhead microphones and let John Bonham pound away. The vocals were processed differently on each verse, sometimes with phasing added. Jimmy Page's backward echo technique, where he would put the echo ahead of the sound, was used on the harmonica. Was very difficult to mix, and due to extensive processing, is best appreciated with headphones.

    No Quarter - 'Houses of the Holy' was released by Atlantic Records on March 28, 1973. This is Led Zeppelin's eeriest and most captivating song. Plant's vocals are chilling and give the song a suspicious aura. The song is one of John Paul Jones' finest hours. His keyboard/synth part is awesome and captures the nature of the song and his bass solo mid-way through the epic is timeless. The version that made it to the album evolved out of a faster version they recorded earlier at Headley Grange, an old mansion in a remote part of England where they wrote and recorded many of their songs, including "Stairway To Heaven." This was a showcase song for bass player John Paul Jones during Led Zeppelin's live shows.

    The Song Remains The Same - ('Houses of the Holy' album) Recorded in 1972 at Stargroves with the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. This was an instrumental called "The Overture" before Plant put lyrics to it. Plant's vocals were sped-up. This is a 5 minute, upbeat rock song with some amazingly adept guitar work from Page. Plant's high register singing to a fast rhythm works very well.

    The Rover - 'Physical Graffiti' double album released on February 24, 1975. This began life as an acoustic piece. Jimmy Page and Robert Plant started writing it in 1970 at Bron-yr-Aur, the cottage in Wales they went to after a brutal US tour. The band never played this live.

    South Bound Saurez - 'In Through the Out Door' was released by Swan Song Records on August 15, 1979. It was Led Zeppelin's last album while together, drummer John Bonham died the next year on September 25, 1980. 'South Bound Suarez' is an upbeat piano styled rocker with plenty of great harmonies.John Paul Jones did much of the work writing this. It is centered around his piano. Jimmy Page made a few minor guitar mistakes, but he left them in. He always preferred a spontaneous feel over a perfect take. One of the few Zeppelin songs Jimmy Page had no part in writing.
     
  2. Heinz

    Heinz Active Member

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    Much respect!

    Jimmy Page has written some bloody amazing riffs over the years.
     
  3. Graeme

    Graeme Well-Known Member

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    I've lost touch a lot. I'm a sad old bastard, I just bought 'The Best of ELO' !
     
  4. Heinz

    Heinz Active Member

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    Guys don't worry I'm outta touch with most new music thats commercial.

    I was brought up on the 50s and 60s rock n roll.

    :lol:
     
  5. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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    I know what you mean, Graeme. I thought about this thread when Udet in another one said he just started listening to LZ. When Adler put up those bands he listed I was blown away but I thought am I really that old? I gonna try to do some Queen, Jethro Tull, Genesis (pre-1980), Aerosmith, Nugent, etc. There was some great music.

    I think the best year for rock music was 1973. Just about every major band came out with their masterpiece album that year.

    And Heinz, no worries, we'll bring you into the 70s! :lol:
     
  6. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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    Jethro Tull was initially a strange kind of blues band. Tull's initial musical approach was torn between Mick Abrahams’ blues vision and Ian Anderson’s more unique approach. When Abrahams left, his replacement Martin Barre became the key player in Tull’s move towards a more progressive style. Starting with "Stand Up," the band’s use of dynamics, Celtic Folk, and classically-oriented tonal structures, along with Ian Anderson’s flute playing and songwriting, became Jethro Tull’s signature.

    Members of the band at various times, included:

    Ian Anderson (flute, mouth organ, claghorn, piano, vocals)
    Mick Abrahams (guitar, 9-string guitar, vocals) 1968
    Martin Barre (electric guitar, flute) 1969 - Present
    Clive Bunker (drums, hooter and charm bracelet) 1968 - 1972
    Glenn Cornick (bass) 1968 - 1971
    John Evans (piano, organ, mellotron) 1971 - 1979
    Jeffrey Hammond-Hammond (bass, alto recorder, backing vocals) 1971 - 1976
    Barriemore Barlow (drums, glockenspiel, marimba, percussion) 1972 - 1979
    John Glascock (bass, vocals) 1976 - 1979
    David Palmer (portative organ, keyboards, orchestral arrangements) 1978 - 1979



    Some Day the Sun Won't Shine For You - "This Was" Release date: 25. October 1968. When Anderson wasn’t drawing attention to himself like a man on fire, listeners could groove to the soulful guitar of Mick Abrahams or crack a smile as Clive Bunker gave his drum kit (and anything else that didn’t get out of the way in time) a sound thrashing. The mix of blues and hearty folk music is clearly a winning combination

    Fat Man - "Stand Up" Release date: 01. August 1969. Many fans of Jethro Tull argue that "Stand Up", is, to all intents and purposes, the first real Jethro Tull album. Traces of Far Eastern influences can be found in "Fat Man" (sometimes considered a jab at departed guitarist Mick Abrahams). The band's use of unconventional instruments such as the balalaika, mandolin, hammond organ, strings and (of course) Ian Anderson's characteristic flute playing is a first on this album. This was also the first album to be filled with songs written and arranged by Ian Anderson, the band’s first album to chart in the U.S. top 20, and their first album to hit #1 in the U.K.

    Teacher - "Benefit" Release date: 01. May 1970. From a musical point of view, "Benefit" is much more sophisticated than "Stand Up", and moves the music of Tull clearly away from the blues. "Benefit" became Tull's first million-seller, barely missing the Top Ten charts in the U.S. The album features a "harder, slightly darker feel" (Ian's words) than Tull's earlier works and clear hints of cynicism. To balance the darkness, Anderson would come to rely on humor to rise above the fray he’d made; “Teacher” (with its clockwork precision) is part of a select company of Tull songs that pokes fun at philosophizing (“Fat Man,” “Thick As A Brick edit #1”) for example. "Teacher," became a fan favorite in the U.S. though the band felt it was a throwaway song and Ian wrote it as a B-side. Ian, to date, professes distaste for this tune.

    Cross-Eyed Mary - "Aqualung" Release date: 19. March 1971. " Aqualung," to many, is Tull's masterpiece. "Cross-eyed Mary" shows Ian singing with a rough edge to his voice. Martin Barre is starting to come along as a guitarist all his own. "Aqualung" did establish one of the most notable features of Tull's music: songs varying with intensity, mixing medium to heavy electrical sounds with lighter acoustical passages. The focus of the song "Cross-Eyed Mary" is an underage prostitute.

    Hymn 43 - "Aqualung" Release date: 19. March 1971. A harder edged song than before, great beat and guitar work. Bassist Glenn Cornick had left the band before this album was recorded, and Jeffrey Hammond-Hammond joined the band just in time to record this album. The addition of Jeffrey Hammond-Hammond on bass (yes, the very same “Jeffrey” chronicled on their earlier albums) doesn’t change the sound of Tull much, nor does the full-time addition of John Evan, who gets buried in the band’s sonic onslaught most of the time.

    The Third Hoorah - "War Child" Release date: 26. October 1974. Originally, the idea was that the basic premise, that of the choices that we face after death, was going to be a film project. Due to a variety of factors, the film project was abandoned, and the "War Child" album was recorded instead. After two single-song concept albums, "War Child" was a return to the traditional format. The front cover catalogs Anderson's debut of his infamous "minstrel" outfit which, quite arguably, looks much more like a jester than a strolling musician.To me this was Tull's best album, full of great music, awesome lyrics and had heavy and slow, electric and acoustic. Just the best all around album. Besides 'Bungle in the Jungle' and 'Skating Away on the Thin Ice of the New day' the album also contains this song, which pounds. Next to John Bonham, Barriemore Barlow was one of the best drummers around at that time. No simple 4/4 timing for him.

    Minstrel In the Gallery - "Minstrel In the Gallery" Release date: 05. September 1975. Written and recorded during Anderson's divorce from his first wife Jenny, the album is characterized by introspective, cynical, and sometimes bitter lyrics. "Minstrel In The Gallery" evokes the world of Shakespeare in its literate lyrics, Elizabethan imagery, and the mixture of rustic folk music and refined classical airs into their rock. Led Zeppelin had 'Stairway to Heaven' and Tull had this song. Don't let the opening fool you. The beginning is played as a jester playing in a king's court and then.... the bridge explodes with Martin Barre's guitar and the band follows, repeating the beginning only now in the present. I love this song.

    Jack-In-The-Green - "Songs From The Wood" Release date: 11. February 1977. "Songs From the Wood" has very nature oriented themes, reflected by such tracks as "Jack-in-the-Green".While the music may appear to be more along the lines of folk music at first, it does have the rock 'n' roll and the rhythms that earlier Tull has had, but with a more rustic touch to it. The creativity on this album is obvious through the lyrics and the music itself, and shows the band at a happy, harmonious point in their working together

    ...And The Mouse Police Never Sleeps - "Heavy Horses" Release date: 21. April 1978. Few Tull albums reward introspection and attention as well as "Heavy Horses". Like it's predecessor before it ("Songs From the Wood"), "Heavy Horses" was the second album in a trilogy of disks that continued the themes explored in the previous album. "...And the Mouse Police Never Sleeps" is an innovative piece of music that has much to recommend it. Something on the order of 20 songs were recorded during the Heavy Horses sessions, but only nine tracks were used on the record itself. Most of the songs are about animals and this one - about a cat - is one of the best. The lyrics are great and the ending vocals are surreal.

    North Sea Oil - "Stormwatch" Release date: 14. September 1979. The last album in the trilogy that had begun with "Songs From the Wood" and continued with "Heavy Horses" came to fruition in 1979. Where "Heavy Horses" was a dry-sounding effort, "Stormwatch" is saturated in sound, sharing more of an affinity with "Songs From The Wood". Tull started to get away from the acoustic (although 'Dun Ringill' on this album is one of his best) and bring Barre's guitar to the fore. "Stormwatch" was the last Tull album of the nineteen seventies, and as such, marked the passing of an era for the band in many ways.
     
  7. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    Achilles Last Stand - awesome song!
     
  8. evangilder

    evangilder "Shooter"
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    Ah the memories! I bought Aqualung on CD when I saw it was out on CD, many years ago. Some of the other classics like UFO "Lights Out", Black Sabbath "Paranoid" and Nazareth "Hair of the Dog" are in my CD collection. I know there's a ton of others, the missus and I have about 2,000 CDs in our collection. And yes, Led Zeppelin is in there too.
     
  9. Screaming Eagle

    Screaming Eagle Active Member

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    same here heinz I don't listen to todays music, I prefer the old stuff
     
  10. Aussie1001

    Aussie1001 Member

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    Yep that pretty much says it.....
    old music is 8)
     
  11. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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    Aerosmith
    (pre 1982)

    Although many people see Aerosmith as a Boston band, none of the band members are actually from that city. In 1970, Steven Tyler, Joe Perry, and Tom Hamilton decided to start a band in Boston. The band was very popular in the 70s, but they almost split due to substance abuse and drug addictions in the early 80s (some members left the band, but later returned). They've sold over 90 million records in the whole world and about 50 million in the US. The only American rock band with more album sales than Aerosmith is The Eagles. Aerosmith is the first group to be embeded in the new Walk of Fame. The members during this time were:

    Steven Tyler : Lead Vocals, Harmonica, Wood Flute
    Joe Perry : Lead Guitar, Backup Vocals
    Brad Whitford : Rythm Guitar
    Tom Hamilton : Bass
    Joey Kramer : Drums



    Mama Kin - 'Aerosmith' released January 1973. At the end of the sixties, rock and roll artists began to discover their true capabilities - capabilities they never knew they had before. It was with this discovery that hard rock and heavy metal began to slowly enter the mainstream. And in 1973, a then little-known hard rock band known as Aerosmith came onto the scene by releasing their self-titled debut album. Coincidentally, Aerosmith's first album was released the same day as another debut by a young musician from New Jersey named Bruce Springsteen. This song is good, solid classic hard rock, and an underrated masterpiece. The line, "Sleeping late and smoking tea" was originally written as "Sleeping late in Sunapee," a small New Hampshire town which many of the band members had ties to.

    Season's of Whither - 'Get Your Wings' released March 1974. "Seasons Of Wither" was one of the darkest and most gut-wrenchingly beautiful ballads of the decade, a true underground classic. Lead singer Steven Tyler wrote this song during the Winter of 1973. The band was staying in a small cabin and Steven was inspired by simply looking out his window and staring at the snowy mountains. The album wound up spending a total of 86 weeks on the Charts.

    Toys In The Attic - 'Toys In The Attic' released March 1975. This was the album where Aerosmith got their wings for real. "Toys In The Attic" is a proud testimony to the band coming further into their own sound, recording one of their hardest, yet most mysterious sounding songs to date. This little tune is more along the lines of classic metal than classic rock, and it puts similar works by other artists of the day to shame. "Toys In The Attic" is an old expression that means "Going Crazy." The song is about a guy losing his mind.

    Rats In The Cellar - 'Rocks' released May 1976. To this day, this album may have enjoyed some of the warmest critical response of all Aerosmith's work. The album is HEAVY, dense, and all-consuming dark. "Rats in the Cellar" kicked up the speed of the album and is one of the best tracks the band has ever recorded. With this track, the band goes for an early heavy metal-inspired sound, and succeeds beautifully. Hard driving beat and great guitar licks make this a fast ride.

    Nobody's Fault - 'Rocks' released May 1976. Quite possibly the heaviest Aerosmith track ever, "Nobody's Fault," is also Joey Kramer's personal favorite Aero track of all time. It's about Earthquakes. Released as a B-side to "Back in the Saddle".

    Last Child - 'Rocks' released May 1976. A swaggering, Blues-fused tune, this was written by Aerosmith lead singer Steven Tyler and lead guitarist Brad Whitford. The lyrics contain many clever double-entendre lyrics from Tyler, and he breaks new ground by rhyming "Tallahassee" with "Sassafrasse." The song wasn't a hit, but remains a favorite among many Aerosmith fans.

    Draw the Line - 'Draw the Line' released December 1977. "Draw the Line" has a great riff and great lyrics. Commenting on "Draw The Line", Joe Perry says it's "One of my favorite riffs that I ever wrote. It's a simple thing, but so are most of the ones that stick to you." "Draw the Line" and "Kings and Queens" shimmer with Perry and Whitford's inventive and sinister guitar inter-play, adding a somewhat gothic dimension to their sound.

    Kings and Queens - 'Draw the Line' released December 1977. "Kings and Queens" is truly the stand-out track on this album and needs to be placed in the highest regards as far as what can be considered an Aerosmith classic. On "Kings and Queens", Steven Tyler comments, "I've always had a fancy to do songs about anarchy and the church and the government. This is not the only one - there's also something like 'St. John.' The band comes up with the licks, and then the music talks to me and tells me what it's about. This one was just about how many people died from holy wars because of their beliefs, or non-beliefs. With that one, my brain was back with the knights of the round table and that **** - I do a lot of fantasizing." - Steven Tyler.

    Lightning Strikes - 'Rock In A Hard Place' released August 1982. "Lightning Strikes" was one of the most rockin songs the band ever put out. Three years after their last album the band had been eclipsed by a slew of young, slick, leather-studded, second generation heavy metal bands. Meanwhile, Brad Whitford had left the band to record an album with ex-Ted Nugent guitarist Derek St. Holmes. Enter Rick Dufay on guitar. The temporary replacements held the band afloat but the strength of the Tyler-Perry collaborative songwriting machine simply wasn't there. "Lightning Strikes" was the radio single of the album, with it's tale of classic gang turf war.

    Movin Out - 'Aerosmith' released January 1973. "Movin' Out" features the band trying their hand at southern/blues oriented rock. The song drew its inspiration from an eviction notice received at the band's old Commonwealth Ave. apartment. If you listen to "Movin' Out", with Headphones you can hear Joe playing in one ear and Steven clearing his throat to get ready to sing in the other....
     
  12. SoD Stitch

    SoD Stitch Banned

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    "Achilles Last Stand" is awesome! I actually discovered that song quite late (1990 or so); I would've added "Battle Of Evermore" and "Going To California" to the list (can you tell LZ IV is my favorite album?).

    "When The Levee Breaks" was the first Zep song I really listened to. I also came upon it at a most propitious time; I was going to college at the time, and the river the college was next to flooded, so if the levees had broken (they came close), I really wouldn't have had any place to go! I took that song very personally, as you can imagine.

    I heard "No Quarter" for the first time on their live album, "The Song Remains The Same"; all of the other songs on that album sound better on their studio albums, except that one. For some reason. "No Quarter" sounds more spontaneous and less contrived live than it does on the studio album.
     
  13. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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    LZ is my favorite, all-time band. I can not think of one bad song (well, maybe one). And for all the hype about being metal and hard and such, the first song that grabbed me and made me explore further was "Battle of Evermore". The mandolin's blew me away! Haven't looked back.

    If you want to add, please do. I'm just trying to list a few songs from each group that would draw new listeners in. Being personal favorites I might miss one or two. A few bands I may have to go with "5 Songs from...." :lol:
     
  14. wilbur1

    wilbur1 Active Member

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    Sorry nj im only 35 maybe 36 cant remember........damn #1 Old school RUSH #2(Iknow you guys will give crap but here goes Neil Diamond) #3 Lynard Skynard #4 social distortion #5 Old school Mettalica :D
     
  15. Thorlifter

    Thorlifter Well-Known Member

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    Neil @%@# Diamond? Uhhh, let the crap flinging begin.

    He's good for his genre and all, but I don't think I could put him ahead of several other bands.
     
  16. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
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    How can you call some these for the old guys! I love Aerosmith!

    I think I even covered them in my thread! I need to get that one going again.
     
  17. wilbur1

    wilbur1 Active Member

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    Sorrry thor, i mean hes no where near as old as keith richards right? the rolling stones predate him by a few centuries:D
     
  18. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
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    I saw The Rolling Stones last summer in Munich. It was actually a pretty good show.

    The fact that Kieth did not die on stage made it even better! :lol:
     
  19. wilbur1

    wilbur1 Active Member

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    I think hes an alien:D
     
  20. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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    or Ahmed the Dead Terrorist! :lol:
     
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