3 British soldiers killed by U.S. bomb

Discussion in 'OFF-Topic / Misc.' started by DerAdlerIstGelandet, Aug 24, 2007.

  1. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Messages:
    41,768
    Likes Received:
    684
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    A&P - Aircraft Technician
    Location:
    USA/Germany
    By NOOR KHAN, Associated Press Writer
    1 hour, 33 minutes ago



    KANDAHAR, Afghanistan - A bomb apparently dropped by an American fighter jet called in for air support killed three British soldiers in southern Afghanistan, officials said Friday. Two soldiers were seriously wounded.

    ADVERTISEMENT

    The British unit was on patrol Thursday evening in Helmand province when it came under Taliban attack, the British Ministry of Defense said.

    "During the intense engagement that ensued, close air support was called in from two U.S. F-15 aircraft to repel the enemy. One bomb was dropped and it is believed the explosion killed the three soldiers."

    They were the first British soldiers killed in friendly fire in Afghanistan, although joint operations between U.S. and British forces in Iraq have been marred by "friendly fire" deaths caused by the failure of equipment and personnel in correctly identifying allies.

    Britain did not identify the soldiers, from 1st Battalion, The Royal Anglian Regiment. It said an investigation was planned.

    British troops have been battling militants for months in Kajaki, where repairs are taking place on a hydroelectric dam that will be able to supply close to 2 million Afghans with electricity.

    "There are a handful of different reasons why this tragic incident has happened and we are not in a position at the moment and I don't think we will be for some time to find out exactly what has happened," said a spokesman for British troops in Helmand, Lt. Colonel Charlie Mayo.

    Mayo said both wounded soldiers were injured seriously.

    The American embassy in London said "the United States expresses its deep condolences to the families and loved ones of the soldiers who died, and we wish those who were injured a speedy recovery."

    After an inquest into the death of British soldier Lance Cpl. Matty Hull, 25, killed in a friendly fire attack by two American pilots in Iraq in 2003, opposition legislators in Britain called for improvements in joint identification systems.

    Britain last year threatened to end cooperation with the U.S. on the new Joint Strike Fighter jet after 10 years of development, until the Pentagon resolved concerns it was not sharing enough information about the aircraft's sensitive software with London.

    Earlier this year, Britain's Defense Secretary Des Browne said that since 1990 12 British personnel had died in friendly fire incidents involving U.S. forces in Iraq, but that there had been no such deaths in Afghanistan.

    U.S. fire has mistakenly killed five Canadian soldiers — one last September during intense airstrikes on Taliban strongholds near Kandahar, and four in April 2002 when an American pilot dropped a 500-pound bomb near where the troops were apparently conducting a live-fire exercise.

    In August 2006, a bomb mistakenly dropped by coalition aircraft killed 10 Afghan police officers on a patrol in the country's southeast.

    In the most famous friendly fire case of the Afghan conflict, Pat Tillman, the former NFL player who became an Army ranger, was killed in April 2004 by fellow troops near the Pakistani border.

    Britain has about 7,000 troops in Afghanistan, most based around Helmand. The latest deaths bring to 73 the number of British personnel killed in the country since the U.S.-led invasion in November 2001.

    Taliban insurgents in the east and south of the country have stepped up their attacks on Afghan and coalition forces over the last 18 months, seeking to overthrow the Western-backed government installed in 2001 after the ouster of the Taliban.

    On Thursday, Afghan forces killed three insurgents, two of whom were Islamic militants from Chechnya, during a one-hour gunbattle in southern Zabul province, said local government head Fazal Bari. He gave no more details.

    Meanwhile, U.S.-led coalition troops shot dead a suspected militant and detained 11 other people during a raid in eastern Afghanistan, the coalition said in a statement.

    The militant was killed Friday while "attempting to engage coalition and Afghan forces" during a raid in Nangarhar province, the coalition statement said. Eleven other men detained will be questioned "as to their involvement in militant activities," it said.

    Troops recovered weapons and ammunition during the raid, the statement said.
     
  2. ToughOmbre

    ToughOmbre Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2007
    Messages:
    4,182
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Retired from Verizon Communications - Now Working for Point Lobster Company, Pt. Pleasant Beach, NJ
    Location:
    Jersey Shore, USA
    Sad, but unfortunately "friendly fire" is one of the many risks/dangers that soldiers face.

    Fortunately, in modern warfare it is relatively rare.

    Remember my father, a rifleman, telling me that in WW II friendly fire incidents were more common than we might otherwise think.

    Of course the scale of that war was huge compared to today, technology notwithstanding.

    TO
     
  3. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Messages:
    41,768
    Likes Received:
    684
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    A&P - Aircraft Technician
    Location:
    USA/Germany
    Yes unfortunatly it is a fact of warfare that I dont think we can ever completely defeat.

    My prayers go to the families of the British soldiers.

    :salute:
     
  4. comiso90

    comiso90 Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2006
    Messages:
    3,672
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Video and multi-media communications expert
    Location:
    FL
    Terrible..

    I'm sure the pilot is mortified.
     
  5. mkloby

    mkloby Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2006
    Messages:
    3,561
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    USMC - Capt - 7532
    Location:
    Jacksonville, NC
    I don't see why it is necessary for reports such as these to make it back to the mainstream populace.
     
  6. ccheese

    ccheese Member In Perpetuity
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    12,669
    Likes Received:
    96
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Occupation:
    R E T I R E D !!
    Location:
    Virginia Beach, Va.
    When this kind of thing happened during WW-II, you never heard about it.
    The military did what they had to do and it was taken care of on their
    level. It never got to the newspapers. Now the newspaper tell everything,
    including things the general public should not be informed of.

    Charles
     
  7. rogthedodge

    rogthedodge Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2007
    Messages:
    173
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    No doubt there'll be lots of ill-informed outrage at this but, as you say, it's a consequence of hurling lots of hot lead around.

    Should be viewed in relation to the comments recently by a UK officer that the RAF were 'useless' compared to USAF in Afghanistan .

    More bad news for 1RAR.

    RIP lads
     
  8. ToughOmbre

    ToughOmbre Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2007
    Messages:
    4,182
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Retired from Verizon Communications - Now Working for Point Lobster Company, Pt. Pleasant Beach, NJ
    Location:
    Jersey Shore, USA
    That's true. And the media doesn't mind shedding a bad light on anything. On the opposite end of the spectrum the bad press that went on in the Tillman friendly fire incident could have been avoided if only the truth was told from the outset. As stated before and elsewhere, friendly fire is a fact of life in warfare. Be honest with the next of kin with regard to how a loved one was killed in the line of duty and no problem should arise. And the general public does NOT have to know everything.

    TO
     
  9. Clave

    Clave Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2005
    Messages:
    3,166
    Likes Received:
    40
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Occupation:
    Graphic Designer of sorts
    Location:
    Deep in suburban Surrey
    Damn... :cry:
     
  10. v2

    v2 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2005
    Messages:
    5,940
    Likes Received:
    624
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Cracow
  11. DOUGRD

    DOUGRD Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2007
    Messages:
    804
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Occupation:
    Aircraft Mechanic working in general aviation.
    Location:
    Alexandria, MN. USA
    You forgot one thing though, during WW2 there were the censors who made sure the wrong stories didn't get out. And for the most part I think the press back then had little problem with most of the censorship. But since Vietnam and the "at this very moment... live in your living room" mentality of the press corps, the competitiveness for the "breaking story" combined with the technology available today and the "Imbedded Reporters" syndrome has made "screening outgoing info" almost a thing of the past.
     
  12. DOUGRD

    DOUGRD Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2007
    Messages:
    804
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Occupation:
    Aircraft Mechanic working in general aviation.
    Location:
    Alexandria, MN. USA
    I think Der Crewchief is right, regrettably. Even with the advances in battlefield science human error still plays a part.
     
  13. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Messages:
    41,768
    Likes Received:
    684
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    A&P - Aircraft Technician
    Location:
    USA/Germany
    Unfortunatly there will be many ill informed people that will post stupid comments about this.
     
  14. trackend

    trackend Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2003
    Messages:
    4,039
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Retired tech support railway engineer
    Location:
    Ipswich, Suffolk
    Unfortunately as has already been stated if you use dangerous devices this sort of thing will happen but I bet a pound to a penny the old complaint will come out. I got this from a serving squaddie. "How come It always seems its the US and never other countries that carry out the friendly fire"?. I think he's wrong as obviously if by far the biggest contingent is the US, if there is a FF incident its far more likely to involve US forces. its just a fact of statistics.
    In WW2 the death rate in just training was very high. At Inveraray in Scotland (the training camp for combined operations) over 100 troops died whilst training for amphibious assault most through drowning.
    Soldering is a dangerous business even in peace time weapons training still kills but during a conflict FF incidents are inevitable. I don't think we should rest on our laurels as lessons can be learned from each case and improvements made to help reduce the number that occur , but danger close (as it seems to have been in this incident) is always a calculated risk.
     
  15. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Messages:
    41,768
    Likes Received:
    684
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    A&P - Aircraft Technician
    Location:
    USA/Germany
    Agreed Trackened.

    Just a interesting side not. Most of the time when a FF incident involving aircraft happens it is because false coordinates for the bomb to be dropped in on were called in from either the unit needing support or some other form of communicator to the aircraft.

    I dont know what led to this incident but just a thought to think about.
     
  16. ToughOmbre

    ToughOmbre Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2007
    Messages:
    4,182
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Retired from Verizon Communications - Now Working for Point Lobster Company, Pt. Pleasant Beach, NJ
    Location:
    Jersey Shore, USA
    Warfare, combat is still an inexact science, regardless of the level of technology.

    What's the old saying, "Once the shooting starts.........."

    TO
     
Loading...

Share This Page