A story from a book I read

Discussion in 'Stories' started by B-17engineer, Jan 30, 2008.

  1. B-17engineer

    B-17engineer Active Member

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    From a book Half a WIng, Three engines and a prayer.

    "At 1310 we began a slow letdown. Somewhere near Amsterdam, Holland, I witnessed an event that left me dumbfounded. Down below us and slightly ahead were a couple off crippled B-17's streaking like hell for home. The one at the higher altitude suddenly began jettisoning everything they could get there hands on to lighten the load. Someone threw a full box of .50 caliber ammo. It went plunging down and hit the lower B-17 right between the No.1 and No.2 engines leaving a gaping hole. At 1331 I noted in my log that five me bailed out of a B-17 of the "C-K" squadron. I've often wondered what happened to the other 5-maybe they made it back, but i doubt it. One hell of a way to go down!"

    "SInce there was never a C-K squadron on the 8ths roster, this ship had to be "Meat Hound", a B-17F 42-29524 carrying the 358ths V-K symbol on the tail. Many crews reported the strange sight of men bailing out of the crippled B-17 that later rejoined formation. Lt.Shoup's crew positivly identified this aircraft as No. 524. Shoup's crew saw the plane with two feathered props and three parachutes. Other crews saw nine men jumping from the bomber over Holland, "Making mostly delayed jumps"

    "Meat Hound was flow by Lt. Jack Watson and crew, they were on there eighth mission. He ordered them to hit the silk after the bomber had lost two engines and caught fire. He was about to jump himself when the flames abated anough to risk staying with the airplane. Watson managed to land the plane at Metfield."
     
  2. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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    By Brian D. O'neill. Good book. I've read it several times.
     
  3. B-17engineer

    B-17engineer Active Member

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    I know i have fallen in love with it!
     
  4. ToughOmbre

    ToughOmbre Active Member

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    Speaking of stories.....

    1LT William R. Lawley's MOH citation is extraordinary.

    Rank and organization: First Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Corps, 364th Bomber Squadron, 305th Bomber Group. Place and date: Over Europe, 20 February 1944. Entered service at: Birmingham, Ala. Born: 23 August 1920, Leeds, Ala. G.O. No.: 64, 8 August 1944. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action above and beyond the call of duty, 20 February 1944, while serving as pilot of a B-17 aircraft on a heavy bombardment mission over enemy-occupied continental Europe. Coming off the target he was attacked by approximately 20 enemy fighters, shot out of formation, and his plane severely crippled. Eight crewmembers were wounded, the copilot was killed by a 20-mm. shell. One engine was on fire, the controls shot away, and 1st Lt. Lawley seriously and painfully wounded about the face. Forcing the copilot's body off the controls, he brought the plane out of a steep dive, flying with his left hand only. Blood covered the instruments and windshield and visibility was impossible. With a full bomb load the plane was difficult to maneuver and bombs could not be released because the racks were frozen. After the order to bail out had been given, 1 of the waist gunners informed the pilot that 2 crewmembers were so severely wounded that it would be impossible for them to bail out. With the fire in the engine spreading, the danger of an explosion was imminent. Because of the helpless condition of his wounded crewmembers 1st Lt. Lawley elected to remain with the ship and bring them to safety if it was humanly possible, giving the other crewmembers the option of bailing out. Enemy fighters again attacked but by using masterful evasive action he managed to lose them. One engine again caught on fire and was extinguished by skillful flying. 1st Lt. Lawley remained at his post, refusing first aid until he collapsed from sheer exhaustion caused by loss of blood, shock, and the energy he had expended in keeping control of his plane. He was revived by the bombardier and again took over the controls. Coming over the English coast 1 engine ran out of gasoline and had to be feathered. Another engine started to burn and continued to do so until a successful crash landing was made on a small fighter base. Through his heroism and exceptional flying skill, 1st Lt. Lawley rendered outstanding distinguished and valorous service to our Nation.

    TO
     
  5. B-17engineer

    B-17engineer Active Member

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    Great Story!!!!!!!!
     
  6. B-17engineer

    B-17engineer Active Member

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    Hats off to those men :)
     
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