Avro Lancaster v Avro Lincoln

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by pattle, Nov 27, 2013.

  1. pattle

    pattle Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2013
    Messages:
    692
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    18
    How much better was the Avro Lincoln (originally known as Lancaster MKIV) compared to the Avro Lancaster MKIII? Obviously the Lincoln was an improvement on the Lancaster but was something better needed?
     
  2. Shortround6

    Shortround6 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2009
    Messages:
    9,769
    Likes Received:
    800
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    retired Firefighter
    Location:
    Central Florida Highlands
    There is an article on the Lincoln in the Flight Global archives with some bomb load/speed/range charts and the Lincoln was a considerable advance on the Lancaster. Unfortunately by the time the Lincoln shows up the state of the art is the B-29. The British used a small number of B-29s post war (or during early cold war).

    lancaster | avro lincoln | 1946 | 0101 | Flight Archive
     
  3. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2011
    Messages:
    3,743
    Likes Received:
    439
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Aircraft Engineer
    Location:
    Nelson
    Plans for the Lancaster Mk.IV and V were made in mid 1942 and were initially proposed to have been put into service in a year to have an impact on the war without causing too much interruption of current Lanc production; both the new Lanc variants as proposed and the Windsor were considered to be the best for this requirement, as well as a call for a long range bomber for use against Japan. The urgency to get the Lincoln (there was some debate over the change of name - Avro suggested Lincoln, but Bomber Command wanted to retain Lancaster, but the Mk.IV and V became the Lincoln B Mk.I and II respectively in mid 1944) into service sooner was thwarted by events as the Air Staff believed that the Lanc as it was would suffice for the rest of the war and by the time the first one flew in 1944, production numbers of existing bombers were being wound down and eventually a large number of Lincoln orders were cancelled.

    As an aside, when first proposed in June 1943 the Air Ministry initially preferred the Handley Page HP.65 'Super Halifax' over the Lanc IV, but thought its weight and drag figures were too optimistic. Eventually there was concern about the redesign of the Halifax's wing that would cause delays beyond mid 1945 and it was cancelled, despite having better performance and load carrying capability over what became the Lincoln.

    The Lincoln was to be something of an interim as originally proposed until the big '100 ton Bomber', put forward as a draft requirement in mid 1942, entered production and service. The most visible hardware from this rather ambitious project, which would have rivalled the B-36 in size and capability was the Bristol Brabazon airliner, which was based on the same technical concept and layout.
     
  4. pattle

    pattle Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2013
    Messages:
    692
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    18
    When I look at the Lincoln I can't help but think that the day of these sort of aircraft was over before it arrived. It does seem however that had the Lincoln arrived before 1945 or if the war against Germany had lasted a while longer that the Lincoln may have offered a better chance of survival to Bomber Command Crews, but really compared to the B29 it looks like an old fashioned aircraft. As far as using the Lincoln to bomb Japan is concerned, I am very glad it was never tried, but the Lincoln would certainly have been better than a Lancaster with a huge petrol tank on it's back
     
  5. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2011
    Messages:
    3,743
    Likes Received:
    439
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Aircraft Engineer
    Location:
    Nelson
    Yep, I agree, Pattle; it was overtaken by events. The B-29 Washington in RAF service was only meant to be an interim between the Lincoln and until the Canberra entered service.
     
  6. Piper106

    Piper106 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    Messages:
    160
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    18
    #6 Piper106, Nov 30, 2013
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2013
    Shortround6 sums it up. Had the Lincoln gone into service in late 1943 or early 1944, it would have been compared with the Halifax, B-17, and B-24. It was an advance on those machines and the memories would have been good. Coming out post war, as it did, it gets compared to the B-29, and that comparison is NOT pretty.
     
  7. pattle

    pattle Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2013
    Messages:
    692
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Yes the Lincoln belonged to the earlier generation of the aircraft you mentioned, I suppose the British did with the Lancaster what the Americans did with the B24 and got the Lincoln, whereas the B29 was perhaps a template more than a relic.
     
Loading...

Share This Page