B-17 Fuddy Duddy

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Yeah! I'd love to have a B-17 and a Mustang for an air-to-air shoot. You wouldn't be able to sandblast the grin off my face after that.

I could beleive that but then again I would be the same way. :lol:
 
Fuddy Duddy is based at John Wayne Airport in Orange County CA at Martin Aviation. It is owned by William Lyon. It flys about once a month and is kept in airworthy condition. I used to work at the Martin Aviation and have had the privilege of working on and riding in the aircraft on more the one occasion (including the Chino Airshow).
As for the birdstrike, The entire leading edge was replaced after the aircraft was ferried back to John Wayne. Boeing ingeniously attached the leading edges with a series of 1/4" pins. allowing for us to fit a replacement leading edge in about a day.
A museum is currently being finished on site at Martin Aviation and the aircraft will be being kept out the elements within a few weeks. I can assure you the Fuddy Duddy will continue to fly and be mainted to standards that exceed those of the EAA.
 
Spooner, are you involved with the group down there? Ray Dieckman did a fabulous job flying Fuddy Duddy at Chino this year.
 

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I get to see Fuddy Duddy every time it flys.

By the grace of god, the flight path the pilot(s) takes too and from the airport, seems to always be over my neighborhood.

Nothing like hearing the roar of four radial engines in the distance, and then seeing the B17 come into view!
 
Fuddy Duddy is based at John Wayne Airport in Orange County CA at Martin Aviation. It is owned by William Lyon. It flys about once a month and is kept in airworthy condition. I used to work at the Martin Aviation and have had the privilege of working on and riding in the aircraft on more the one occasion (including the Chino Airshow).
As for the birdstrike, The entire leading edge was replaced after the aircraft was ferried back to John Wayne. Boeing ingeniously attached the leading edges with a series of 1/4" pins. allowing for us to fit a replacement leading edge in about a day.
A museum is currently being finished on site at Martin Aviation and the aircraft will be being kept out the elements within a few weeks. I can assure you the Fuddy Duddy will continue to fly and be mainted to standards that exceed those of the EAA.

Thats great news Spooner, I would love to see the inside of it some day. Maybe some day it will come back to airventure. I know when it was on loan to the EAA that I never able to see it up close. Good luck on your restoration.
 
As much as I admire Spooner his facts are a little bit off. We have a surplus of leading edges and I had to determine which one was in the best shape. I had to remove the decrepid de-ice boot, and the associated tubing and adel clamps that supplied air for de-icing procedure. I then had to cover the de-ice boot outlets and clean up the leading edge so that it would look like it was part of the aircraft. That took two days. If you look closely, the 2007 airshow pics of the top of the right wing and the 2008 pics of the right wing are different. The difference is the blue paint. Look closely and you will see the difference. Being that it was the first time that I had performed this evolution it took about a 1.5 days to get the leading edge off. Spooner was right about the pins, what he didn't tell you was that there are about 36 of them. Also those pins don't just drop out or drop in. You have to massage them in ways that would make your first girlfriend proud of you. He also negelcted to tell you about the 200 or so screws and washers that have to be removed and installed to further insure the security of the leading edge. Also, there is a fairing that covers the outboard section of the wing to the wing tip. It took Spooner one day to fabricate that fairing. He did a great job and it still looks great. All in all it took two guys about five days from time of removal to time of install. If anyone in interested I will tell you what parts of the hawk that I found in the wing structure
 
Not against a Fort! I heard about it on the radio. I found it ironic that you guys were the tail-end Charlie for the massive gaggle and all those other planes went by without a problem. Here is what it looked like from my perspective.
 

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Funny thing was that we saw it but didn't feel a thing. No shudder, nothing. It lends to the belief that many of the crewmembers had regarding the toughness and durability of the airplane.
 
Funny thing was that we saw it but didn't feel a thing. No shudder, nothing. It lends to the belief that many of the crewmembers had regarding the toughness and durability of the airplane.
The first bird strike I think was much more exciting , I believe it went in at the nose and they were picking up bird carcass all the way to the back
 

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