Bomb bays - JU88 Do17

Discussion in 'Technical' started by Maxrobot1, Feb 22, 2010.

  1. Maxrobot1

    Maxrobot1 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2009
    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    18
    I have built models of He111s, Ju88s and Dorniers (17 and 217). I know that the He111 bombs hung by their nose and fell through spring-loaded individual doors but I cant find any info on the bomb bays of Ju88s or Dorniers.
    Cutaway views of the two types do not show that feature and models of Dorniers just have the doors shut. Ju88 kits usually had externally mounted big bombs (as did the Airfix He111).
    British bomber's bomb bays tended to be shallow and run almost 1/3 or more of the fuselage and of course U.S. bombers tended to be between the wing spars with the bombs hanging from side racks or central supports.
    Of all the books I have seen on the Ju88, none show bomb bay doors open.
    Can anyone out there help me understand how the German bombers internal bomb bays were configured?
    Thanks.
     
  2. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2008
    Messages:
    47,633
    Likes Received:
    1,415
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Cheshire, UK
    On the Ju88, and I think also the Do17, the bombs were suspended horizontally. The best person to provide more detail would be Guttorm (username-JU88A1), as he has his own, real, full size, genuine 1940 Ju88A-1 to play with!!
    I do know that detailed drawings/plans of the bomb bays of both of these types are as rare as rocking horse poo,and i have a side elevation drawing which isn't much help, but Guttorm might be able to help.
     
  3. mudpuppy

    mudpuppy Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    Messages:
    646
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Appalachian Foothills in Virginia
    I'm no expert but your question is intriguing. I did a little rooting around on the Deutsche Luftwaffe Cockpitinstrumente Homepage Titelseite Instrumente Gertebrett Baumuster website and found these manuals listed for Junkers aircraft:
    Luftwaffe Cockpits
    Look at the one titled "Handbuch, Teil 12B, Abwurfunlage Juni 1941 55 Seiten". On page 17 of this Luftwaffe manual it shows that the bomb bay doors of the Ju-88 A1-5 are opened by a hand crank on the starboard side, between the pilot and rear gunner(?) position.

    Does that look correct to you? I've always been a little surprised at how the He-111 doors were spring loaded; operating so much differently than what i knew of Allied bombers.
    Derek
     
  4. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2007
    Messages:
    12,162
    Likes Received:
    123
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    The back of beyond
    With Terry (Airframes)...

    I also have some cutaways and copies of original blueprints (in books) showing details of the Ju 88 bomb bay, and various photos of the Do 217 bomb bay. Drop us your address in a PM if you want copies.
     
  5. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2008
    Messages:
    47,633
    Likes Received:
    1,415
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Cheshire, UK
    Just found a cutaway of a Do17Z I forgot I had! The bombs were suspended horizontally, on two vertical 'beam' type racks, but the cutaway does not show the bomb door arrangement. Spring-loaded doors were not unusual. For instance, the Blenheim had wooden doors, which were spring-loaded to aid in closing. Once the lock was released, the doors 'snapped' shut.
    The He111 doors were cranked or hydraullically opened, the spring-loaded areas being the baffles at the front of each bomb cell, designed to provide 'smooth' air, to prevent the vertically suspended, tail down bombs from fouling the doors, bays or under fuselage when released. Again, Guttorm can probably advise further, as he also has a full size, real, He111 to play with !!!
     
Loading...

Share This Page