Chipped paint revisited

Discussion in 'Weathering Questions, Tutorials and Guidebooks' started by VALENGO, Jan 22, 2009.

  1. VALENGO

    VALENGO Member

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    Sorry, i was late to the discussion about chipped paint. I have read many times about salt grains but never tried it; instead, I make as follows:

    1) put aluminium paint where you want chipped paint; the thicker, the better. And take a picture or draw a sketch to remember where the Al paint was set (no need to cover the whole ship). Try to not leave brush strokes nor cover panel lines, etc.

    2) paint camo as you prefer.

    3) scratch carefully whit sand paper or a blade (cutter or something). This is the real trick, you get more accurate control scratching with this metod than whit salt grains.

    Well, that is all!
     
  2. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    This is one of good techniques.But there can appear a trouble with the salt grains removing.
     
  3. muller

    muller Active Member

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    I read on another forum that sugar is better than salt, it sticks better.

    I find a piece of sponge dipped in silver paint and then most of the paint rubbed off the sponge (like dry-brushing) then dabbed on the kit is a good method. If you over-do the sliver, you can go over it when dry using the same method with the camo colour.
     
  4. VALENGO

    VALENGO Member

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    Well, but I don´t put anything between aluminium and camo, just scratch slightly the camo until the al is exposed. Personally never use dry brush for this, the average eye can always tell if there is alu really exposed "from under the paint" or just a stain over the paint, even in 1:72!
     
  5. Greedy

    Greedy Member

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    One way i like to do it is using a silver pencil brought from the local craft shop works really well. Make share you sharpen it to get more realistic chipping.
     
  6. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

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    Another alternative......paint your Silver/Aluminium overall...add your 'colours' over the top...'Dab' masking tape on the colours after they are dry of course and you will lift the paint up off the silver/aluminium in small random bits....
     
  7. drgondog

    drgondog Well-Known Member

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    I wonder how overblown 'chipped paint' really is?

    I have seen thousands of close ups of cowlings, leading edges of wings, cockpit entry, top surface of wings near fuse and rarely ever see evidence of paint scratches deep enough to get to bare metal... some, but very few.
     
  8. melhibbard

    melhibbard New Member

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    Applying "Rub and Buff" on the bare plastic, then burnishing that area with a 4X4 gauze pad will produce a shiny metallic surface to which paint will not stick too well. Then, after I've airbrushed the color onto the surface I remove some of the excess colored paint with a piece of masking tape lightly applied to the painted surface, and quickly ripped off. However, prior to applying the tape to the painted surface, I first apply the tape to my forehead so as to pick up a bit of oil, and reduce the "stickiness" of the tape. This has worked amazingly well for all models where I have used it. This technique was developed by the late Dave Bozanski during our modeling days in the late 70's.
     
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