CO of USS The Sullivans Relieved of Command

Discussion in 'SitRep' started by ccheese, May 26, 2010.

  1. ccheese

    ccheese Member In Perpetuity
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    CO of USS The Sullivans Relieved

    May 20, 2010 Navy News

    MANAMA, Bahrain - The commanding officer of the Mayport-based destroyer USS The Sullivans [DDG 68], Cmdr. Neil Funtanilla, was relieved of command by Commander, Combined Task Force (CTF) 50, Rear Adm. Phil Davidson, due to loss of confidence, following an Admiral's Mast.

    The Non-Judicial Punishment (NJP) proceedings were convened to address allegations that Funtanilla was derelict in the performance of his duties during an inbound transit to the port of Bahrain, when his ship collided with a buoy.

    The misjudgments associated with this incident called into question Funtanilla's ability to continue to effectively and safely lead his command. As a result, he was relieved due to loss of confidence.

    Cmdr. Robert Cepek, the Surface Operations Officer for CTF 50, will temporarily command USS The Sullivans until a permanent replacement is named.

    Funtanilla, who took command of the ship in August 2009, has been temporarily reassigned to administrative duties at U.S. Naval Forces Central Command.


    Another skipper bites the dust....

    Charles
     
  2. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

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    Not paying attention to navigation has cost many a skipper their command.
     
  3. Matt308

    Matt308 Glock Perfection
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    Whatever happened to the sub commander that collided with underwater terra-forma? You guys remember that? Was he relieved of command too?
     
  4. N4521U

    N4521U Well-Known Member

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    Good to see the Sullivans are still remembered and honored.
     
  5. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

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    The undersea mountain near Guam?
     
  6. Matt308

    Matt308 Glock Perfection
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    Yeah I think that was it and what about the Hawaii accident where they rammed the Japanese ship during a practice emergency surface? What happened to those commanders? I don't recall reading about the final outcome. I can't imagine it was good.
     
  7. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

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    The undersea mount was not on any maps, so I doubt the skipper can be held accountable.
     
  8. RabidAlien

    RabidAlien Active Member

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    Sonar would've told him there was something there. As for the skipper who surfaced under the Japanese boat, I think he was scapegoated and relieved of command. Periscopes don't look upwards, and an emergency blow comes up at a pretty steep angle....very easy for a small ship to be in the blind-spot and unlucky enough to be occupying the same piece of surface that the sub wants to use...
     
  9. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

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    Sonar doesnt work well when the ship is at high speed.

    Plus what are the operators going to do .... listen for the mount?
     
  10. RabidAlien

    RabidAlien Active Member

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    Ummmm....yeah. And exactly how fast do you think a sub can go underwater? It can't outrun soundwaves.
     
  11. timshatz

    timshatz Active Member

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    Faster you go, the less clear the sound is. But that is considering the sonar being in active mode, which most subs (and ships) usually don't use. The majority of the sonar work is done with passive sonar. That just listens. If the thing isn't making any noise (and sea mounts tend to be very quiet, like mountains on dry land) then they won't hear it.

    And the sub won't use active sonar if there is no reason. Subs like to be quiet, it's the advantage they least like to lose. Flip on the active sonar and it's like turning on a flashlight in a dark room full of people. Everybody know where you are, usually who you are too. No problem if all the people in the room are friends and expect the flashlight. Not good if some (or all) of the people aren't always of the same perspective as you.
     
  12. RabidAlien

    RabidAlien Active Member

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    I know. I served on three. They also have a terrain-mapping sonar that scans the floor. I've been on watch in the control room when we had to make a slight detour due to a rise in ocean floor that "may have been" a mountain. We didn't stick around to find out.
     
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