Hispano Aviacion Corporation

Discussion in 'Post-War' started by gekho, Mar 10, 2010.

  1. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    The Hispano-Aviacion Corporation was a spanish aircraft manufacturer placed in Triana, Sevilla, that operated from 1939 to 1972. This company derived form the Hispano-Suiza factory, that gained a great fame during the WWI thanks to its engines, that were supplied to the Allies during the conflict. When the Spanish Civil war broke out, the Guadalajara´s factory fell in hands of the Republicans, so a new factory was built in Seville for the construction of new planes. In 1943 the company was acquired by the spanish goverment, starting to built the Messerschmitt Bf-109 under licence.

    In 1947 the Hispano-Aviation produced the HA-43, a trainning aircraft for the Spanish Air Force. In the following years the company would sign an agreement with professor Willy Messerschmitt to design and build two trainning planes and a jet with a tailless delta configuration. The prototypes were the HA-100 Triana, HA-200 Saeta y HA-300. The HA-200 Saeta was the first spanish jet, flying for the first time the 12th of august of 1955. In 1972 the Hispano-Aviacion was absorb by CASA.
     
  2. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    The Spanish government in 1942 arranged a manufacturing licence with Messerschmitt AG to build the Bf 109G-2, with DB605A engines, propellers, instruments, and weapons to be supplied from Germany. This proved impossible, as Germany was incapable of meeting her own needs, let alone Spain's; in the event, only twenty-five airframes (minus their tails) and not even half the necessary drawings were delivered. As a result, Hispano substituted the 1,300 hp Hispano-Suiza 12Z-89 engine, which flew at Barcelona in 1944, while the first HA-1109-J1L made its maiden flight 2 March 1945 at Seville, using a VDM prop and lash-up engine mounting. The other twenty-four airframes were flown during 1947-9 with Escher-Wyss props, but never became operational.

    A developed version, with an improved installation for the Hispano-Suiza 12Z-17 engine, appeared in May 1951 as the HA-1112-K1L. Fitted with a three bladed DH Hydromatic[2] propeller, it was nicknamed Tripala ("three blades"). Its armament consisted of one or two 12.7mm Breda machineguns and Pilatus eight-packs of 80mm rockets. It first flew in 1951, and although 200 units were planned, only 65 were ever built. The aircraft in the upper picture was posted to Tablada, Morón, Torrejón and León. It was retired from service in 1955. On 6 May 1971 it was placed in the Museo del Aire (Spain). These Hispano V12-powered versions of the German design, since the Hispano engines used a clockwise rotation propeller, with the Bf 109F-introduced asymmetric vertical fin still present that was airfoiled to produce a slight left movement of the tail, that counteracted the left-side torque reaction from the counterclockwise rotation Daimler-Benz DB 601 605 inverted V12 engines that they were designed for, created a hard-to-counteract right swing on takeoff instead, from the combination of the airfoiled fin and the Hispano engine's clockwise-turning propeller essentially "working" in the same direction.

    A second version, the HA-1110-K1L, was a two-place tandem trainer model. The final variant was the HA-1112-M1L Buchon (literally, "big throat"), which is both a male dove or a pelican in Spanish. It first flew 29 March 1954. The 1112-M1L was equipped with the 1,600 hp Rolls-Royce Merlin 500-45 engine and Rotol propeller. This engine required the addition of a deep chin intake, whence the name Buchón. Its armament consisted of two 20 mm Hispano-Suiza 404/408 cannons and two Oerlikon or Pilatus eight-packs of 80 mm rockets. It remained in service until 27 December 1965. HA-1112-M1Ls remained in flying condition until the mid-1960s. This made them available for theatrical use, disguised as Bf 109Es and Gs in movies like "Battle of Britain", "Memphis Belle", and "The Tuskegee Airmen". Remarkably, Buchons also played the Bf 109's opposition, the Hawker Hurricane, in one scene in "Battle of Britain".
     

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  3. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    Some more pictures. Enjoy!!
     

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  4. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    The Hispano HA-100 Triana (named for the district of Seville where the Hispano Aviación plant was located) was a military trainer aircraft developed in Spain in the 1950s. The first aircraft designed by Willy Messerschmitt after World War II, it was a conventional, low-wing cantilever monoplane with retractable tricycle undercarriage. The pilot and instructor sat in tandem.

    The programme was initiated when the Spanish government issued a requirement in 1951 for a replacement for the Hispano HS-42s and HA-43s then in service. Hispano proposed two versions with different engine power, the HA-100E and HA-100F, the former for basic training, the latter for advanced training, and the construction of two prototypes of each was undertaken. Development was fraught with problems, mostly in obtaining suitable parts, and most particularly with engines. The ENMASA Sirio was originally selected for the HA-100E, but when this proved unavailable, the ENMASA Beta was used instead, a heavier and much more powerful engine than had been wanted for the basic trainer. As it transpired, the performance of this engine was far from satisfactory, and when the second prototype flew in February 1955 (the first HA-100F), it was powered by a Wright R-1300.

    Flight testing was very positive, and the HA-100 performed well in comparative tests against the American T-28 Trojan, leading to a contract for 40 of the aircraft. However, obtaining engines remained a stumbling block, with Spain unable to afford to import the Wright engine in quantity. Eventually, production ground to a halt, and the decision was taken to scrap the airframes under construction, salvaging only the wings and empennages for use on the HA-200 project.
     

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  5. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    The HA-200 Saeta (Dart) was the first Spanish turbojet aircraft. It was developed from the earlier piston powered trainer the HA-100 Triana with the participation of Willy Messerschmitt. The HA-200 was a low winged monoplane of all metal construction, with a tricycle undercarriage. It was powered by two Turboméca Marborés mounted side by-side in the forward fuselage and fed from an intake in the nose, exhausting from nozzles just aft of the wing trailing edge. The crew of two was accommodated in tandem in a pressurised cockpit, the first to be Spanish built and designed.

    The prototype first flew on 12 August 1955 and the first production aircraft flew in October 1962. The HA-200A aircraft were delivered to the Spanish Air Force with the designation E.14. A single seat version (the HA-220) for the ground-attack role was developed and delivered to the Spanish Air Force with the designation C.10, first flying on 25 April 1970, remaining in service until the end of 1981. The aircraft was built in Egypt under licence as the Helwan HA-200B Al-Kahira by the Helwan Air Works.
     

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  6. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    #6 gekho, Mar 10, 2010
    Last edited: May 3, 2010
    Spanish version of the Fiat CR.32 Chirri used for trainning pourposes.
     

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  7. CharlesBronson

    CharlesBronson Well-Known Member

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    Buena info Gekho; i had video of the HA 200 somewhere, let me search it and put it.
     
  8. Waynos

    Waynos Active Member

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    The HA-300 was transferred to Egypt AFAIK, wheere it was called the Helwan HA-300. Was this the last 'Messerschmitt' design to fly?
     
  9. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    De puta madre!! Cuelgalo cuanto antes, porque estos videos son escasos.

    Yes, I think so; the Ha-300 was the last design of Messerschmitt in Spain, but I am almost sure that he participated in the design of VJ-101, along with Bölkow y Heinkel.
     
  10. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    Great pics gekho! The CR.32 is one of my favorite aircraft. There are a few HA-200s here in the states. I know a fellow who owned one for a while.
     
  11. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    #11 gekho, Mar 11, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2010
    If you like the Fiat, you should visit the "Museo Storico dell´Aeronautica" (Vigna di Valle, Italia); It has a Hispano-Aviacion Ha-132 in very good conditions, much better than the one at Cuatro Vientos Museum. Concerning the Ha-200, there are four or five flying here. I am preparing a thread about the Infante de Orleans Foundation that own one of this fighters airworthy.
     

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  12. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    #12 gekho, Mar 11, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2010
    The Hispano HS-42 and its derivative, the HA-43, were military trainer aircraft produced in Spain in the 1940s. The basic design was that of a conventional, low-wing, cantilever monoplane with seating for the pilot and instructor in tandem. The HS-42 had fixed, tailwheel undercarriage with spatted mainwheels, while the HA-43 had retractable main units. Produced on the assembly line that had been used to build Fokker D.XXI fighters, the HS-42 shared some components with this aircraft.
     

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  13. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    After World War II, Willy Messerschmitt (as a German citizen) was prohibited from undertaking any research or development related to the German military, including the manufacture of aircraft, until 1955. He therefore moved to Spain where he set up the Hispano Aviación aviation company and started designing an ultra light fighter aircraft in 1951. The development was very slow and Messerschmitt was only able to build a delta shaped plywood glider without a tail. Towed by a He-111, the test flight for the glider wasn't completed due to instability and the airplane didn't even get airborne. Due to funding problems and the resultant long development time, the project was abandoned by the Spanish in 1960. The design was then acquired by Egypt and the design team, headed by Messerschmitt, moved to Helwan, Egypt, to continue their work on the HA-300, which now stood for Helwan Aircraft 300. Ferdinand Brandner, an Austrian jet engine expert, was also invited to develop a turbojet for the new fighter. Egypt aimed to produce a lightweight supersonic, single-seat fighter which could join the Egyptian Air Force as an interceptor.

    Development of the HA-300 started in the test facilities and workshops in Factory No. 36 in Helwan, southeast of Cairo, under the supervision of the Egyptian General Aero Organisation (EGAO). The HA-300 was originally designed for the afterburning Orpheus BOR 12 turbojet, but it was then modified for the Brandner E-300 engine, which would have an afterburning rating of 4,800 kgp. India also helped in the funding of the E-300 jet engine in exchange for a new powerplant for its HF-24. The E-300 jet engine ran for the first time in July 1963. The first prototype of the HA-300, powered by a 2,200 kgp Orpheus Mk 703-S-10, first flew on 7 March 1964, and achieved Mach 1.13. Egypt sent two Egyptian pilots to India in 1964 to prepare for the HA-300 flight development.[1] It was followed by a second Orpheus-powered prototype which first flew on 22 July 1965. The third and last prototype was fitted with the Egyptian E-300 engine, with which it would be capable of attaining 12,000 m and Mach 2.0 within 2.5 min of takeoff. This prototype was not flight-tested and only completed taxiing trials. A total of 135 million Egyptian pounds was spent on the development, and the E-300 engine was given to the Indian government for the use in the HF-24 Marut fighter.

    After the Six-Day War defeat, Egypt needed most of its military budget for acquiring new aircraft and air defenses and so, due to this and the availability of Russian fighters, the Egyptian government terminated the project in May 1969. The first HA-300 prototype was bought by Daimler-Benz Aerospace AG (DASA) in 1991 and was airlifted to Germany for restoration at Manching. The process took MBB five and a half years to complete and today the HA-300 is in the Deutsches Museum at Oberschleißheim near Munich.
     

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  14. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    #14 gekho, Mar 11, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2010
    The HA-300 Alacran (Scorpion) was a project of a ground attack fighter and close support of the sixties. Because of the lack of funds and the purchase of the F-5 Freedom Fighter, the project was abandoned. This plane was offer to Argentina, where it was very appreciated, but it never came into production.
     

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  15. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    - A Hispano Aviacion Ha-1112, the spanish Messerschmitt Bf-109

    - A Hispano Aviacion Ha-42, made with the pieces of the Fokkers XXI sent to Spain during the Spanish Civil War

    - A Hispano Aviacion Ha-220 Saeta, flying in formation with a F-5 Freedom fighter
     

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  16. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

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  17. wheelsup_cavu

    wheelsup_cavu Well-Known Member

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    I concur.

    Good stuff Gekho. 8)


    Wheels
     
  18. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    The Hispano Aviacion HS-50 was the Dewoitine D.600 Spanish version. The prototype used a Hispano Suiza HS-12Z engine; The 12Z was the final evolution of the series of Hispano-Suiza V-12 aircraft engines, which had just entered production when France fell to the Germans during World War II. A small number were produced during the war but the German occupation government would not allow full-scale production to start. After the war small numbers were built to equip new designs, but the rapid introduction of the jet engine ended further development.

    The 12Z differed from the earlier 12Y primarily in the use of four valves per cylinder operated by dual overhead cams. This gave the cylinders considerably better volumetric efficiency and faster operation, raising the RPM from 2,400 to 2,700. The engine was also designed to run only on 100 octane fuel (instead of 87, which was common at that point) which allowed the compression ratio to rise from the 12Y's 5.8:1 to the 12Z's 6.75:1. These changes raised the power from 1,000 to 1,300 hp (750 to 970 kW) at sea level. Unfortunately the engine continued to use a single-stage, single-speed supercharger and therefore lacked the all-altitude performance of German and British designs. But tuning the supercharger for a different critical altitude improved high-altitude performance considerably, delivering 1,500 hp (1,120 kW) at 21,000 ft (6,400 m) as opposed to 930 hp (690 kW) at 2,950 ft (900 m) for the 12Y.

    Small prototype runs started in 1939, and were fitted to the French Armée de l'Air's front-line fighter aircraft, the M.S.410 and D.520, creating the M.S.450 and D.524 respectively. Production of the main model, the 12Z-17, was just starting at the time of the armistice. Production was undertaken in Hispano-Suiza's Spanish factories, but these engines had many problems and were never used in any numbers. After the war a new version tuned to operate with 92 octane fuel, as opposed to the -17's 100/130, was built in limited numbers as the 12Z-89. Compression ratio was raised slightly to 7:1, but with the lower grade fuel the power dropped slightly to 1,280 hp (950 kW) at 2,600 rpm (1,479 hp (1,100 kW) maximum take-off).

    These engines apparently had the same sorts of reliability issues as the earlier -17's made in Spain, and the type never entered production. Spanish Air Force choose the BF109G. There were two versions, a long nose, that with the needle front, and a short nose, with a Spitfire 9 similar front.

    Technical data:

    Wingspan: 10.9 m
    Lenght :8.85 m
    Height 3.55 m
    Engine: Hispano Suiza HS 12 Z
    Armament : One Hispano Suiza HS 404 engine 20 mm canon an four 7.5 mm band feed machine guns in the wings
     

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  19. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    Some more pictures of the first "spanish" messerschmitt
     

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  20. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    And the final version, the popular "Buchón"
     

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