Huey's last hurrah

Discussion in 'Modern' started by syscom3, Jul 24, 2007.

  1. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2005
    Messages:
    12,631
    Likes Received:
    309
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    The National Guard - Huey's last hurrah

    Huey's last hurrah

    By Sgt. Benjamin Cossel
    196 Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Columbus, Ohio

    CAMP GRAYLING, Mich. (7/2/2007) - As you go about your daily routine during annual training this year and the familiar "womp-womp-womp" sounds of helicopters fill the air, stop for a moment and turn your head toward the sky. Scattered amongst the Blackhawks, Chinooks and Kiowas buzzing about you'll notice two UH-1H Iroquois reliably doing what they've done for more than 35 years.

    Hollywood's infatuation with the Iroquois, known in common vernacular as the Huey, and exemplified in such movies as "Apocalypse Now" and "We Were Soldiers," has planted the image of the Huey as firmly in the American psyche as the tank and the M-16 rifle. As the sun sets on AT 2007, so too, will that iconic image of Army aviation take its final ride for the Ohio Army National Guard.

    "The Huey is what's called legacy technology," said Col. Rick Hall, the state Army aviation officer for Ohio.

    "It doesn't have redundant systems, it doesn't have near the lift capability of the modern aircraft, it doesn't have enough range and it doesn't do as well in a crash as modern aircraft," Hall said.

    Hall explained that the Army has been in the process of phasing out the Huey for several years but that Ohio resisted releasing their Hueys for as long as possible. "The state doesn't have enough Blackhawks, so frankly, we've used the Hueys to fill out our fleet."

    Hall estimates that at their peak, the Hueys numbered about 120 in service, now only two fly with Company B, 1st Battalion, 137th Aviation Regiment.

    "It'll be a sad, sad day when these birds finally go away," said Columbus, Ohio resident Sgt. 1st Class Robert Baker, a Huey mechanic with Company B.

    With 33 years in the military, all in the aviation field, Baker has worked on nearly every aircraft fielded since his days as a private.

    "The Huey is dependable and fun - you just don't have to worry about it, it's a mechanically sound aircraft," Baker said.

    Besides being reliable, he said there was no other aircraft he preferred flying more. "You could just throw open the doors and see the whole world," Baker said. That sentiment apparently filled others as people constantly stopped Baker to ask for rides in the Huey.

    "We've taken so many people up in this aircraft. VIP's, governors, even General Kambic [Brig. Gen. Matthew Kambic, Ohio's assistant adjutant general for Army] loved it. So many people have gone up in the Huey and they all just love it."

    With the end of his flying days in the Hueys looming near, chief warrant officer Brian Michael, a pilot with Company B maintains a pragmatic attitude.

    "I'll be a little sad to see them go, but they've served their purpose. Time to move on to bigger, better and faster aircraft," Michael said.

    After having flown Huey missions in the jungles of Vietnam, Michael seems the perfect choice to fly these aircraft in their final days. During annual training the Huey has been used for Bambi bucket operations, range sweep and medevac missions, but Michael remembers well when the Huey was the king of the air during the Vietnam War.

    "The Huey was the perfect aircraft for the mission in Vietnam," said the Columbus, Ohio based Michael.

    Michael stops to consider all the different missions he's flown in the Huey;

    rescue operations during the blizzard of 1978 in northern Ohio, casualty evacuation and resupply operations during mudslides in north-central Ohio in 1989.

    "Those state operations, the ones where we were actually helping people, saving lives, those were some of the best," Michael said.

    Heading out to the flight line, pilot and crew chiefs alike prepared the Huey for one in the a list of missions. Near the second week of August, the two remaining Hueys will be released from the Ohio Army National Guard, transferred to their new homes.

    One of the Hueys will go to the Colorado National Guard to continue service, the other will go to Texas where it will be refurbished for foreign sales.

    "I'd keep those Hueys for another two years if I could," said Hall. "It'll definitely be a sad day when we finally let them go."
     

    Attached Files:

  2. evangilder

    evangilder "Shooter"
    Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2004
    Messages:
    19,419
    Likes Received:
    137
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    Network Engineer/Photographer
    Location:
    Moorpark, CA
    Home Page:
    I know there are a number of vets here like myself that will be said to see the last of the Hueys retired. I know I will never forget them.
     
  3. davparlr

    davparlr Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2006
    Messages:
    2,934
    Likes Received:
    105
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    retired avionics engineer
    Location:
    Southern California
    A great warrior. It will always have a place of honor for a generation of great but underappreciated soldiers.
     
  4. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Messages:
    41,767
    Likes Received:
    684
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    A&P - Aircraft Technician
    Location:
    USA/Germany
    I love the Huey. My very first ride in a helicopter was in a Huey. Over here in Germany the US Army still has a few Hueys in service. Saw one yesterday at the airfield. Will see if it is still here today.
     
  5. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2005
    Messages:
    23,199
    Likes Received:
    784
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Aircraft Maintenance Manager/ Flight Instructor
    Location:
    Colorado, USA
    I place it in the same category as the C-47 - the greatest helicopter ever flown...
     
  6. evangilder

    evangilder "Shooter"
    Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2004
    Messages:
    19,419
    Likes Received:
    137
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    Network Engineer/Photographer
    Location:
    Moorpark, CA
    Home Page:
    I would second that one, Joe. I survived a hard landing after an auto-rotation in one once. Other than that, they always got us home.
     
  7. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2005
    Messages:
    12,631
    Likes Received:
    309
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    I think the Huey IS the icon image of the vietnam war.
     
  8. Bf109_g

    Bf109_g Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2006
    Messages:
    634
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    New Zealand
    :salute: They were the best choppers I've ever read about.
     
  9. mkloby

    mkloby Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2006
    Messages:
    3,561
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    USMC - Capt - 7532
    Location:
    Jacksonville, NC
    Hey guys - the Huey is far from retired. The USMC still has UH-1N's in their inventory(although not the old single turboshaft), and production has begun on the new model, the UH-1Y. That model will prove to be the most capable Huey yet. She's far from done!
     
  10. pbfoot

    pbfoot Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2005
    Messages:
    7,636
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    niagara falls
    We still fly them here mind you they have all glass cockpit and 4 rotors better known as Bell 412. Interesting fact is we were the ones to give you the Twin Huey giving it two engine reliability
     
  11. mkloby

    mkloby Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2006
    Messages:
    3,561
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    USMC - Capt - 7532
    Location:
    Jacksonville, NC
    How did you give it to us when Bell manufactures the Huey?

    Here's the new Yankee
     

    Attached Files:

  12. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2005
    Messages:
    23,199
    Likes Received:
    784
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Aircraft Maintenance Manager/ Flight Instructor
    Location:
    Colorado, USA

    Sorry Pb - the "Twin Huey" was developed in Texas in the mid 1960s. You guys just have part of the production line along with the 206.
     
  13. pbfoot

    pbfoot Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2005
    Messages:
    7,636
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    niagara falls
    I'm trying to figure the thing out we only had about 20 or so single 's and the rest were twins maybe we were the launch customer for the twin Wiki isn't to clear on who initiated developement but I was under impression it was us as to use the PT6 plus giving twin safety .Possibly PWC designed the twin pack of the PT6 and tranny more investigation to follow after work
     
  14. rogthedodge

    rogthedodge Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2007
    Messages:
    173
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    I love the way the pilot co-pilot have bailed out leaving the crew-chief in charge :D
     
  15. pbfoot

    pbfoot Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2005
    Messages:
    7,636
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    niagara falls
    * In 1965, Bell had experimented with a single twin-engine Model 208 "Twin Delta" Huey prototype, which was a UH-1D fitted with Continental XT67-T-1 engine module, consisting of two T72-T-2 turboshaft engined driving a common gearbox. This exercise was performed as an experiment using company funds.

    In early 1968, Bell had discussions with the Canadian government and Pratt Whitney Canada (PWC) that led to an agreement in 1969 to build a twin-engine version of the Model 205. Bell flew a UH-1D fitted with a new PWC "Twin Pac" engine, consisting of two of PWC's popular PT6 turbines driving a common gearbox, in 1969. This prototype led to the production "Twin Huey" or "Model 212 / UH-1N", essentially a UH-1H fitted with the PWC T400-CP-400 (PT6T-3) Twin Pac, providing a total of 1,140 kW (1,530 SHP). Each turbine of the Twin Pac could actually provide 671 kW (900 SHP), but the rotor system couldn't deal with 1,343 kW (1,800 SHP). However, in the event of a failure of one of the turbines, the remaining operational turbine could be run at its full 671 kW (900 SHP) output.

    The ground pounders did not use the single Hueys at all these were solely for base rescue flights
     
  16. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Messages:
    41,767
    Likes Received:
    684
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    A&P - Aircraft Technician
    Location:
    USA/Germany
    That is true. The Army as well has announced a contract to modernize there Hueys for continued ops over another decade in garrison environments.
     
  17. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Messages:
    41,767
    Likes Received:
    684
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    A&P - Aircraft Technician
    Location:
    USA/Germany
    No the first customers of the Twin Engined Huey (UH-1N) was the US Navy and the Marines. The US Navy and Marines were the first to take deliveries of the Twin Huey. Then it was sold to other countries. Canada may have been in discussions with Bell about it but the first actual customers to put it into service were the Navy and Marines.

    Wiki is not a really good source to use as anyone can edit the pages. (dont take me wrong I use it too for quick searches but you have to take most of it with a grain of salt.
     
  18. pbfoot

    pbfoot Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2005
    Messages:
    7,636
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    niagara falls
    According to my sources the Huey or Twin Huey was first ordered by USAF quickly followed by CAF in 71 the Twin Pack of the PWC PT6 engine was instigated by the Canadian Gov't we no longer have the Huey or Bell 212 in inventory but have replaced it with the Bell 412
    The Bell UH-1 Huey
     
  19. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Messages:
    41,767
    Likes Received:
    684
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    A&P - Aircraft Technician
    Location:
    USA/Germany
    Hmm I am going to have to dig out my Bell book.
     
  20. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2005
    Messages:
    23,199
    Likes Received:
    784
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Aircraft Maintenance Manager/ Flight Instructor
    Location:
    Colorado, USA
    "In 1965, Bell had experimented with a single twin-engine Model 208 "Twin Delta" Huey prototype, which was a UH-1D fitted with Continental XT67-T-1 engine module, consisting of two T72-T-2 turboshaft engined driving a common gearbox. This exercise was performed as an experiment using company funds.

    In early 1968, Bell had discussions with the Canadian government and Pratt Whitney Canada (PWC) that led to an agreement in 1969 to build a twin-engine version of the Model 205. Bell flew a UH-1D fitted with a new PWC "Twin Pac" engine, consisting of two of PWC's popular PT6 turbines driving a common gearbox, in 1969.

    This prototype led to the production "Twin Huey" or "Model 212 / UH-1N", essentially a UH-1H fitted with the PWC T400-CP-400 (PT6T-3) Twin Pac, providing a total of 1,530 horsepower. Each turbine module of the Twin Pac could actually provide 900 horsepower each, but the rotor system couldn't deal with 1,800 horsepower. However, in the event of a failure of one of the turbines, the remaining operational turbine could be run at its full 900 horsepower output.

    Bell began deliveries of the UH-1N to the US Air Force in 1970, which obtained 79 and used them for special operations. The US Navy and Marine Corps were particularly interested in the type, as the twin-engine configuration provided greater flight safety for overwater operations, and had obtained a total of 221 by 1978. Two standard Marine UH-1Ns were converted to "VH-1N" VIP transports, and six Model 212s were built new to this standard for the Corps as well.

    The Canadian Armed Forces, which had backed development of the type, received their first Model 212 on 3 May 1971, with the last of 50 delivered about a year later. The CAF originally designated the type the "CUH-1N", but this was later changed to "CH-135".


    The Bell UH-1 Huey
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. Readie
    Replies:
    29
    Views:
    1,142
  2. s1chris
    Replies:
    22
    Views:
    1,294
  3. FLYBOYJ
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    1,522
  4. sunny91
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    1,009
  5. B-17engineer
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,792

Share This Page