Liberator b-24

Discussion in 'Old Threads' started by krakus57, May 10, 2009.

  1. krakus57

    krakus57 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2008
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    I need ANY informations about Liberators problems by take-off !!

    URGENT !!
     
  2. michaelmaltby

    michaelmaltby Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2009
    Messages:
    3,917
    Likes Received:
    623
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Toronto
    Read Stephen Ambrose's book - The Wild Blue - it's about B-24 pilots in Europe and specifically George McGovern.

    MM
     
  3. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2005
    Messages:
    12,631
    Likes Received:
    309
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    Excellent book!
     
  4. Negative Creep

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2007
    Messages:
    895
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Great book that. If I remember rightly didn't they have a tendency to swerve on take off and were a real pig to handle at low speeds?
     
  5. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2005
    Messages:
    23,203
    Likes Received:
    786
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Aircraft Maintenance Manager/ Flight Instructor
    Location:
    Colorado, USA
    From what I heard the nose gear would shimmy if you kept pressure on it at high taxi speeds. The idea was to keep the yoke back at all times.

    I also read that the MLG was weak and was subjected to collapse. My wife's grandfather was a co-pilot on one that experienced a MLG failure during a training mission right after the war. I think the aircraft only had about 1,400 hours on it which is really "young" for a multi engine aircraft aircraft.
     
  6. v2

    v2 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2005
    Messages:
    5,942
    Likes Received:
    625
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Cracow
  7. Capt. Vick

    Capt. Vick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Messages:
    7,895
    Likes Received:
    637
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Long Island, New York
    Not long ago Syscom3 recommended I read "Shattered Sword", as he read on the forum that I was interested in the battle of Midway. Well his recommendation was spot on. That book was fantastic and I never properly thanked him other then to suggest he read another book on Midway that I also thoroughly enjoyed. (The title escapes me at this time however.) So it is with that in mind that I here and now, in front of this illustrious forum, respectfully offer my heartfelt thanks for recommending that excellent book, but in the same breath humbly disagree with his (and others) opinion of the late Stephen Ambrose book "Wild Blue".

    (Rant below)

    For starters, I felt this was a vanity piece written for George McGovern. If you are a McGovern fan by all means read it, but I highly suspect that there are other more worthy biographies that would fit the bill better. Second, there was next to no drama in the book other then having his and his wife’s luggage stolen stateside and a flight instructor telling him he will fail him if he doesn’t successfully complete a night navigation problem. In a word: Boring. Real life perhaps, but if you are looking for exciting tales of B-24 bomber pilots and crews give this one a wide berth. He flew in the 15th air force (I believe) in Italy towards the end of the war when fighter opposition was lightest and I honestly can’t remember him or his crew being in an instance of impending mortal doom. If I was a pilot in WWII I would have liked to have had his flying career because I would have had a good chance of making it back alive. Make no bones about it, I could never hold a candle to any member of the “greatest generation” and this doesn’t take anything away from him or any other vet, but surely any number of lesser known pilots had combat careers more deserving of being written about. In fact this book was one of only two books that I ever returned and the only one after reading in its entirety. (I know that was a bit cheap, but I felt that strongly about it.) All of this was done BEFORE allegation of plagiarism came to light. This was a sad way for such a great narrative historian to end his career.
     
Loading...

Share This Page