Mosquito as a bomber: when it was capable to what?

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by tomo pauk, Jan 18, 2013.

  1. tomo pauk

    tomo pauk Creator of Interesting Threads

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    A spin off from wuzak's thread. I'm inviting knowledgable people to share their data about capabilities of Mosquito as a bomber, namely what weight of bombs was it able to carry on what distances and what speed might we expect the bomber to achieve while doing that, both prior and after the bombs are dropped. Timing of the capabilities is also important.
     
  2. Shortround6

    Shortround6 Well-Known Member

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    "Timing of the capabilities is also important"

    It is very important as as a general rule of thumb the Mosquitos powered by the Merlin 70 series engines could cruise 5000ft higher than the Merlin 21 powered versions while carrying the same load and cruise 30mph faster at that altitude.

    Performance for the late models can be found here:

    http://www.ww2aircraft.net/forum/ot...tech/mosquito-mks-viii-ix-xvi-notes-8939.html
     
  3. Neil Stirling

    Neil Stirling Member

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    #3 Neil Stirling, Jan 18, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2013

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  4. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    What was Mosquito CEP when bombing at high, medium and low altitude?
     
  5. wuzak

    wuzak Well-Known Member

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    The Mosquito's bomb load went from 1000lb to 2000lb before it entered operational service. When the strengthened basic wing went into production (late 1942/early 1943?) the bomb load capacity went to 3000lb, or 2000lb with extra fuel tanks.

    From Ian Thirsk's book I can say that at least one B.IV was ready to use the 4000lb bomb by September 1943, conversion starting in June, but it was sent to storage and didn't see service until 1944. Another conversion was started in May 1943.

    W4050 was converted to use the Merlin 61 from October 1941, testing beginning in June 1942. W4050 had the 61s swapped for 70s in December 1942.

    B.IXs first came off the line in March 1943. B.XVIs, I think, sometime late in 1943. In the mean time PR.IXs and PR.XVIs were also built.
     
  6. wuzak

    wuzak Well-Known Member

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    What do you call high, medium and low altitudes?
     
  7. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    My definition doesn't matter. Historical RAF accuracy tests would be conducted per RAF definitions for high, medium and low altitude.
     
  8. wuzak

    wuzak Well-Known Member

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    Low altitude Mosquito bombing missions usually meant on the deck. Accuracy was high.

    High altitude probably meant about 25,000ft for B.IVs, 30,000+ for B.IXs and B.XVIs.

    Not sure they did medium altitudes, as that is the best place to get killed by AA fire....
     
  9. CobberKane

    CobberKane Banned

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    A fully restored mosquito recently had it's maiden flight in New Zealand - lots of footage on the net. A question: could the mossies canopy be jettisoned? Or did the crew have to get out through that little door?
     
  10. mhuxt

    mhuxt Active Member

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    [HR][/HR]
    "Out through the crew door" was standard procedure in a bail-out, however the canopy roof could be jettisoned if required. It wasn't recommended, due to the increased likelihood of striking the tail on the way out.
     
  11. tomo pauk

    tomo pauk Creator of Interesting Threads

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    Maybe someone has good data about Mosquitoes carrying 4000 lbs and drop tanks, if that combination was ever tried out?
     
  12. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Just to expand on the answer regarding emergency exit on the Mossie. On the Fighter/fighter bomber, parachute exit was made via the crew entry door on the starboard side. The door could be jettisoned via a handle on the door which released the hinge retaining pins. On the bomber/PR versions, parachute exit ws via the floor crew entry door, jettisoned in a similar manner.
    All versions had an emergency exit panel located centrally on the roof of the canopy, which was for use in ditching or belly landing only.
     
  13. mhuxt

    mhuxt Active Member

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    Hi Tomo,

    My understanding is that 4k plus wing drop tanks was the standard configuration for the XVI in attacks on Berlin. I have a couple of books here which are fundamentally squadron diaries with added extras, one for a squadron equipped with XX and XXV Mossies and the other for a squadron with the XVI. I'll see what I can do re: sortie times, routes, bombing altitudes, speeds, etc. May take a while.

    Meantime, Sharp Bowyer (again) say that by Autum 1943, after the Mossie night bombing campaign had been going in earnest for 3 or 4 months, "B.Mk.IVs were attacking at around 27-28,000 feet at about 320 T.A.S. over the Ruhr, and were being damaged on about 50 percent of their sorties, although in most cases only slightly." My understanding is that 11 aircraft had been lost after the first 1,000 night sorties in 8 Group.
     
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