Nice little book I found...

Discussion in 'WWII Books' started by Marcel, Apr 23, 2008.

  1. Marcel

    Marcel Well-Known Member

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    Last week I was at a second-hand Book market and I found this little book. It's a book about the technique used in a/c. Not at a level of an experienced engineer, but for the interested technical reader.
    It's in Dutch and I could date it as being printed in 1943 or 1944. The text mentions "the recently introduced Short Stirling" and talks in present about "the countries in war"
    What I think is amazing is that this book, printed during the war in occupied Holland, and describes allied war material in detail. It is talking about the structure of the geodetic structure of the Wellington and even describes the Napier Sabre engine in some detail. It also gives the cockpit layout of the "Boeing Stratosphere plane" whatever that may be. I'm wondering how the writer got this information, being in German occupied territory. I just thought I should share some pictures for the ones that like these sort of things...
     

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  2. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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    Wow! Great find, Marcel!
     
  3. pbfoot

    pbfoot Active Member

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    I like the old books as well I recently read the 1933 Aviation Yearbook
     
  4. Catch22

    Catch22 Well-Known Member

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    Very cool! Those old book stores are great, you never know what you'll find.
     
  5. Graeme

    Graeme Well-Known Member

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    Hi Marcel. Nice find!

    My brother gave me a Dutch book titled "DE ONTWIKKELING VAN HET VLIEGTUIG" about twenty years ago and I'm guessing that it was printed in the early 1940's, but of course I can't speak Dutch...

    I think it's a general history of aviation heavily illustrated with Dutch examples.

    I would greatly appreciate if you could decipher the title and translate some of the foreword(?) for me. The previous owner was a "Wolfgang Wieuw", dated "Febr.'44".

    Many thanks,

    Graeme.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. HoHun

    HoHun Active Member

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    Hi Graeme,

    "Already many pens have been set in motion to describe the history of aviation, and this is hardly surprising since if it is an interesting enterprise, then that is due to this technology making itself so well known, especially in those times we're living in."

    >of course I can't speak Dutch...

    Me neither :) Don't trust my translation! It's actually quite confusing to me.

    The foreword notes that the typcial aviation history books usually contain stories of adventures and aviation pioneers, and that this book won't offer that, but consider at the evolution of aviation from a more technical perspective. The reader won't have to deal with formula, but the book is will describe its topic using lots of photographs. The "why" of modern configuration will be emphasized. Aerostats won't be covered since they won't be improtant in the future :)

    The last paragraph seems to be thanks to the publishers of the book and the editors and publishers of the magazine "Vliegwereld" ("Aviation World") who have provided photographs and illustrations.

    It could all mean something completely different, though :)

    Regards,

    Henning (HoHun)
     
  7. Marcel

    Marcel Well-Known Member

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    Good job Henning,

    I'll correct some minor mistakes.

    Means: which is so impotant today

    Im not sure about the aerostats, "statische luchtvaart" means static aviation, whatever that may be.

    No, you did it quite well, my compliments

    Graeme: "DE ONTWIKKELING VAN HET VLIEGTUIG" means the developement of aviation. I saw the book being sold on the internet. that was one from 1946 though.
     
  8. Graeme

    Graeme Well-Known Member

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    Marcel and Henning, many thanks, much appreciated. Always wondered what the title and true purpose of the book was. Also surprising Marcel, is that this book contains cutaways of German military aircraft that were at the time of publication devastating Europe?

    (Henning, you don't speak Dutch?...how did you translate it?)
     
  9. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

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    great find Marcel!
     
  10. HoHun

    HoHun Active Member

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    Hi Marcel,

    >Good job Henning,

    Thanks :)

    >Im not sure about the aerostats, "statische luchtvaart" means static aviation, whatever that may be.

    I simply assumed "static" could refer to the type of lift, opposed to the "dynamic" lift employed heavier-than-air vehicles.

    Thus my guess on "aerostats" - which might be an old-fashioned term as well, I don't actually know where I picked it up - maybe from one of the old documents Micdrow posts for us :)

    Regards,

    Henning (HoHun)
     
  11. HoHun

    HoHun Active Member

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    Hi Graeme,

    >(Henning, you don't speak Dutch?...how did you translate it?)

    I understand a bit of Low German, which is a language in its own right that has some similarities to Dutch. Give me some time and a written text in Dutch, and I can work out the gist of it as long as it doesn't contain too much ideomatics - it's a fun challenge :)

    English has some similarities to Low German too, but so much Romanic vocabulary (courtesy of the Normans) that you really have to learn it properly to understand anything at all.

    Regards,

    Henning (HoHun)
     
  12. Krabat42

    Krabat42 Member

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    The problem with "Niederdeutsch" (low german) and Dutch is that there are many false friends, words that sound close but have a different meaning, sometimes contradicting, in modern german. This is because the languages split some time ago, I think it is the same in other language families. But Henning is right, it's a fun challenge. :lol: Especially since dutch often sounds funny for a german ear.

    But isn't there a Babel Fish for Dutch somewhere?

    Krabat
     
  13. Marcel

    Marcel Well-Known Member

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    Ah, but German is funny for us to. We sometimes use German words as a joke. When I was a kid, I used to watch "The A-team" on the German TV, only for the synchronisation. The "German" B.A. was so much more fun than the American one :lol:
    Most people here will understand German quite well. I come from Groningen and I noticed that the Ost-Frisian people speak exactly the same language. Only difference is, where we use Dutch words, the Ost-Frisian have replaced it by German words.
     
  14. Krabat42

    Krabat42 Member

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    What goes around, comes around. I like that. ;)

    Do you have an example? Just for my information. I studied several semester german language and literature at the university, so it's always interesting to me. And a few years ago my girlfriend learned dutch just for fun. Couldn't understand why. ;):lol:

    Krabat
     
  15. parsifal

    parsifal Well-Known Member

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    The english think we aussies dont speak english actually, so it sounds kinda similar
     
  16. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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    And us Yanks just stand there dumbfounded by it all. :)
     
  17. kool kitty89

    kool kitty89 Well-Known Member

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    We Yanks are dumbfounded by other yanks!

    Darn vernacular. ;)
     
  18. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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    Hey, no cussin'!!

    :)
     
  19. Heinz

    Heinz Active Member

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    We are printing our own Dictionary soon Njaco............:lol:
     
  20. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

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    It'll be the world's first English dictionary with English translations...:)
     
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