Operation Mincemeat

Discussion in 'Non-fiction' started by ccheese, Jul 20, 2011.

  1. ccheese

    ccheese Member In Perpetuity
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    Just started this book, titled "Operation Mincemeat", by Ben MacIntire. Everyone knows the story of Operation Mincemeat.... years ago there was a book titled, "The Man Who Never Was", and a movie by the same name.

    This book goes into more detail, and if you recall, the real identity of Major Martin was never revealed. It's a good read (so far) and the fact that the Germans were taken in on the rouse puts it over the top.

    Charles
     
  2. ozhawk40

    ozhawk40 Active Member

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    #2 ozhawk40, Jul 20, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2011
    Yep, I've got hold this book too Charles. Interesting that Montagu ended up in a cameo role in the movie, the plan was based on a 1930's detective novel and the Ian Fleming connection. A great read.

    More info on Mincement

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Mincemeat
     
  3. ccheese

    ccheese Member In Perpetuity
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    #3 ccheese, Jul 20, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2011
    Re: “Operation Mincemeat”, by Ben MacIntyre...

    I am simply amazed at the information given out, in this book, about the dead body that was to become Capt. (Acting Major) William Hynd Norrie Martin, Royal Marines.

    In reality he was a 34 year old destitute Welshman named Glyndwr Michael. Born in Aberbargoed, Wales, UK of very poor parents, on January 4, 1909 at 136 Commercial Street.

    His father contracted syphilis and passed it on to his wife before Glyndwr was born, so it was assumed that the young man was mentally challenged. The book, “The Man Who Never Was”, said that he died of pneumonia. Actually he died of ingesting rat poison and it was never determined whether it was on purpose or accidental.

    This young man, who was actually “a nobody” , was to be the leading actor in a spoof that befuddled the German high command, all the way to the desk of Adolph Hitler.

    It is fitting to note he was buried, with full military honors, by the Spanish government.

    Charles
     
  4. ccheese

    ccheese Member In Perpetuity
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    I am still reading the book, "Operation Mincemeat". The author, Ben MacIntyre, is pointing out so many holes in the plan, I am surprised the British were actually able to pull it off. It the Spanish or Germans had performed an autopsy, it would have been over. If one of the many German spies In Britain had made a few phone calls, it would have been over. "Major Martin" carried letters from his girl, "Pam", with a return address. Had someone taken the time to knock on the door of that address, they would have been told "there's no Pam here". Had they called the office where she was suppose to have been working, they would have been told, "No Pam here" ! He also has a bill for an engagement ring, which he still owed money on. Had the jeweler been contacted they would have been told "we didn't sell that ring". Probably the only real item Major Martin carried were the theater tickets.... Montigu
    and his co-author of the plan, actually did go to the theater that evening. Mr. MacIntyre spends entirely too many chapters giving information on people who were only slightly involved in the plot. The book probably could have been 100 pages shorter. But.... it's still a good read. Don't know that I would recommend it, tho......

    Charles
     
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