Pictures of Cold War aircraft. (1 Viewer)

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NASA F-8 Crusader modified with Digital Fly-By-Wire, in flight, January 10, 1973. Every technologic advancement has a starting point.

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Barricade landing aboard U.S. Navy attack aircraft carrier USS Ticonderoga (CVA-14), which took place on 11 January 1963. An A-4C Skyhawk (BuNo 149605, modex NF511) assigned to Attack Squadron (VA) 55 "Warhorses" has just landed into the barricade. This was due to a landing gear malfunction.

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J
Wow! My heart skipped a beat seeing all those C-141s (definitely "A"s). I recognized number 6077 as a plane I once flew! Great aircraft. Sometimes difficult to launch from home base, lots of systems, but once weight was off the wheels it would take you all over the world and back with not a whisper of problems. Those TF33 engines were great. The C-141A was over powered (its had as much thrust on three engines as the KC-135, with water, on four, and grossed out at the same weight). We almost always maxed space before we maxed weight, which led to the "B", increased load by 30%. Broke my heart seeing them being cut up. Moving up from the T-38 flight planning, which we counted fuel by the pint :) to "weather is marginal at landing? Put on another 20k pounds of fuel, we'll find somewhere to land."
Sure was cold in the back when up high though. Kadena to MaClellen, 1967.
 
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Tomcat No. 3, with Grumman's Chief Test Pilot, Chuck Sewell, at the controls. During aircraft testing, several flights were flown with the right wing locked in the forward position of 20 degrees, and the left wing at 35, 50, 60 and 68 degrees of sweep in flight. Amazingly, it was discovered that in the event of an operational in-flight malfunction, the Tomcat would remain controllable enough for carrier landing in this configuration.

source Jet & Prop by FalkeEins
 
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Tomcat No. 3, with Grumman's Chief Test Pilot, Chuck Sewell, at the controls. During aircraft testing, several flights were flown with the right wing locked in the forward position of 20 degrees, and the left wing at 35, 50, 60 and 68 degrees of sweep in flight. Amazingly, it was discovered that in the event of an operational in-flight malfunction, the Tomcat would remain controllable enough for carrier landing in this configuration.

source Jet & Prop by FalkeEins
I remember when Chuck was killed in the crash of another Grumman product...an Avenger of all things. RIP
 
The Vig doesn't look that much bigger than the F4 in that picture, they look much bigger sitting side by side on the deck or below in the hangar!
 
I have always liked the Vigilante. It is hard to believe it was first designed and flown in the 1950s. If you had rolled it out in the mid 1980s/1990s it wouldn't have looked out of place.
 
To be honest in the FAA we used to wonder :-

a) which idiot thought that a plane that size had any role on a carrier
b) which idiot agreed to it

Which shows just how much we knew about it.

To be fair though, we only had the old Ark Royal and a handful of Vigilantes would have filled her up. So from our perspective, there was some logic to our thinking.
 

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