Pondering over Paint?

Discussion in 'Building Questions, Tutorials and Guidebooks' started by Raven 12, May 5, 2009.

  1. Raven 12

    Raven 12 New Member

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    Hello. I am new to the site and already have a technical question. My question is about model paint. I am currently using Testors Enamel Model Paints for a build I am working on and was wondering if paint purchased from a building supply store would work just as well? The town I live in no longer has a good Hobby Supply store. Thanks.....
     
  2. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    In general, I'd say no. Most 'domestic' paints are made to a thicker formulation, with heavier pigment and oil content and, used straight from the tin, would be far too thick and heavy for modelling use. Even if thinned, this would still be true. To get the paint thin enough to use for modelling, where it wouldn't look like a layer of cake icing, would render it unusable, as it would be thinner than water! The 'domestic' paints are made this way for just that reason, to provide good, quick and easy coverage on walls, woodwork etc., whereas modelling paints are specifically formulated to hold the colour, and give good coverage and adhesion, without being so thick as to clog the detail.
    A good comparison of using 'domestic' paints on models would be like using coloured concrete to paint a door in your house!
     
  3. Maglar

    Maglar Active Member

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    Hey Raven, greetings from the fellow FL.. I once used Testors Enamel and I stopped, if you like it thats great. As for paint supply, most internet shops carry a nice selection of colors and several manufacturers and the paint is usually standard quality and everything so dont worry about it being "tainted". When I was young in modeling I used Krylon from walmart, It wasnt half bad at $3 but a simple finger stroke would make it flicker off more like it was a plastic chip then paint. As Airframes said, mostly walls and such. I stopped using testors because of its fast pigment settlement and "oil" base, I have found a home with acrylics. Hope this helps!

    Corey-
     
  4. Raven 12

    Raven 12 New Member

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    Thanks, I thought as much but I figured I would ask anyway. Which manufactures would you recommend for me to use? I am trying to gain better skills in modeling and the painting part is really setting me back.
     
  5. Matt308

    Matt308 Glock Perfection
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    I use Model Masters (Testors). Both acrylic and oil based enamels. Works for me.
     

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  6. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Still love the A7 Matt!
    The choice of manufacturer is purely an individual one; most people find one they like, and stick with it. I've used Humbrol enamels for around 47 years, but their formulation has recently changed, and I'm not really happy with them at present. I've tried some acrylics, and find Vallejo to be superior to the others I tried, although I still prefer enamels. Putting aside the 'smells' issue of enamels, I have never had any problems health-wise, due to fumes or perceived toxicity - lot of old wives tales can be heard in that area!
    As with anything else constructive or artistic, when it comes to model painting, practice makes perfect - eventually!
    The most important thing to remember when painting models, is that everything is scaled down - treat the job accordingly, by using the correct viscosity of paint, applying and laying it off properly, and you'll soon get the hang of it. The biggest problem area for beginners is brush marks, and 99% of the time, this is caused by too much paint being applied, and not laying it off - in other words, brushing-out the paint so that it covers evenly.
    Unfortunately, the written word and still pictures, can't really convey methods properly or clearly, and a 'live' demonstration is the only real way to show how it's done.
     
  7. Raven 12

    Raven 12 New Member

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    Thanks for all the information. Yes, I am a little frustrated with my painting. Also, the airbrush is throwing me for a loop. I guess practice is all I need. The models I see on this site done by members are AMAZING. Anyway, Thanks so much for the feed back.
     
  8. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    If you think it might help, some time ago I put togerher a (very!) rough guide to brush painting for one of the members, I can post this here if you wish. However, it might take some time, as I'm having Internet connection problems at the moment, and the work for the Group Builds must come first.
    Terry.
     
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