Spinner Question

Discussion in 'Aircraft Requests' started by JCS, Dec 18, 2004.

  1. JCS

    JCS Member

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    Anybody know the purpose of those little fan blade-like things on the front of the spinner?
     

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  2. Nonskimmer

    Nonskimmer Active Member

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    No. :oops:
    Anyone else? :lol:
     
  3. cheddar cheese

    cheddar cheese Active Member

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    Pretty decorations :lol:
    Seriously I dont know either ;)
     
  4. wmaxt

    wmaxt Active Member

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    It was an airflow driven electrical generator for cocpit instruments.
     
  5. JCS

    JCS Member

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    Ah ok, that one has been bugging me for a while.
     
  6. the lancaster kicks ass

    the lancaster kicks ass Active Member

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    good pic..............
     
  7. cheddar cheese

    cheddar cheese Active Member

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    Yeah it is, Ive always like the 189 8)
     
  8. R Pope

    R Pope Member

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    That " fan-like thingie" is part of the variable-pitch mechanism for the propellers. It uses air resistance to control the RPM by changing the pitch of the blades.
     
  9. the lancaster kicks ass

    the lancaster kicks ass Active Member

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    ohhh two contrasting answers...............
     
  10. Nonskimmer

    Nonskimmer Active Member

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    Oh! Oh! Let's bet on 'em! I'll take R Pope's answer! :lol:
     
  11. cheddar cheese

    cheddar cheese Active Member

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    Ok, ill take wmaxt's :lol:
     
  12. evangilder

    evangilder "Shooter"
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    R pope is correct. It is a funky setup to control to pitch of the blades based on the air passing over the spinner.

    From another message board, "the little spinner in the picture above is mounted on a free-turning bearing and is of a known, fixed pitch. When the aircraft is stopped, the little prop on the front is not spinning, and the propeller is in fine pitch. As the airspeed rises, the little prop starts turning and the pitch begins to get more coarse by means of a cam. There is a design speed for the prop and, as long as you don't exceed design speed and power rating, the unit above results in a more-or-less constant speed propeller without the complexity of a pitch control knob in the cockpit."

    Kind of a dynamic pitch control mechanism.
     
  13. Nonskimmer

    Nonskimmer Active Member

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    Yay, I win! :p
     
  14. cheddar cheese

    cheddar cheese Active Member

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    You may have won the battle, but you will not win the war :mad:
     
  15. wmaxt

    wmaxt Active Member

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    That may be true - for some reason I was thinking about the one on the nose of the 163 rocket plane. :oops:
     
  16. R Pope

    R Pope Member

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    If you look close, you'll see that the hub blades have zero pitch. They drag back when the prop turns, activating the above-mentioned cam arrangement and coarsening the pitch of the prop. Many early constant-speed props used similar setups.
     
  17. cheddar cheese

    cheddar cheese Active Member

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    Isnt that a small propellor though? :lol:
     
  18. wmaxt

    wmaxt Active Member

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    Yup, many of the early pitch adjusters were just counter weights on the hub. The P-38 had Curtis electric prop controls, they were a problem early on (runaways and flat pitch when an engine was out - not good) until a second generator was installed.
     
  19. Archangel

    Archangel Member

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    one oter thing why he's right, why would anyone put the generator in such a "unsave" position (u know, where it depends on the wind and stuff) while you can connect it directly to the engine, so you can be shure its always turning.
    and the me 163 only has that generator in the nose, cuz i has no engine, at least none with turning parts ;)
     
  20. Karaya_1

    Karaya_1 Member

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    You are both right....on the FW 189 you see the drive of the variable-blade-pitch-mechanism and on the Me 163 you see the propeller of the electrical power generator !
     
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