That RAND report on bombing Soviet industries?

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by BraselC5048, Apr 10, 2016.

  1. BraselC5048

    BraselC5048 New Member

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    #1 BraselC5048, Apr 10, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2016
    Does anybody happen to know where to find the RAND report I've seen referred to as being on the subject of bombing soviet war industries? It'd be very useful to, after figuring out (sort of) the range of the He 177 to determine what the distance it needed to fly to get to the target actually was, and I haven't seen anywhere else a comprehensive list of locations of Soviet WWII industrial sites, even just the more important ones. Obviously, of course, this is the type of information that the Soviets wouldn't want to be published, (bomb me here!) so that would likely go a long way toward explaining why I haven't been able to actually find that information.

    PS: found the flight documents I needed, but I still greatly need that report, or really any information about what the centers of soviet war production were.
     
  2. tomo pauk

    tomo pauk Creator of Interesting Threads

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    The manual and some charts/tables are available on the internet, re. He 177. The aircraft was featured in several topics here, too.
     
  3. Reegor

    Reegor Member

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    BraselC5048, I'm not sure exactly what you mean by "composite cruise control chart," but I would be quite surprised if one exists, whatever it means! The Germans did not standardize their flying methods to that degree. In fact AFAIK only the Americans had "cruise control," i.e. standardized settings for engines under different conditions. And even the American pilots did not necessarily used them. When LeMay got to the Marianas in early 1945 he started a major program to train and enforce use of these charts. Until then, it was up to pilots.
     
  4. BraselC5048

    BraselC5048 New Member

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    And I found the flight planning documents I needed! and it only took a simple google search, surprisingly. Composite cruise control charts are mostly americans, and mostly for civil aviation with large, 4 engine piston airlines. (Connie's, for example.) Now I have definitive range data, but I still need distance to the target data. There's a RAND report about hypothetical bombing of the soviet union, that would give names of major production center, that I've heard referred to, right? Anybody know where to find it?
     
  5. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

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    So, where did you find your planning documents?
     
  6. c1951

    c1951 New Member

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    Rand is very difficult path to follow. There is the security archive which gives a break down of operations proposed against the Soviet Union in 1950 with the plans. There is a presentation in there by Le May. The main operational area was the UK. Back up was a place in Africa. Then a few operations, flown by B36, from Alaska. They were not expected to survive. RAF Bomber Command Boeing Washingtons were to be assigned to Strategic Air Command complete with their crews from March 1950, in the event of war. They were to carry atomic weapons supplied by the USA. The fissile material was to be flown in from the states. The background to this is in Sonic to Standoff, published January 2016.
    This might be it http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/reprints/2010/RAND_RP1412.pdf
     
  7. mikewint

    mikewint Well-Known Member

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    Initial Location

    Kharkiv

    Kharkiv

    Nizhny Tagil

    St Petersburg(Leningrad)

    St Petersburg(Leningrad)

    St Petersburg(Leningrad)

    Chelyabinsk

    Volgograd(Stalingrad)

    Nizhny Novgorod(Gorky)

    Yekaterinburg(Sverdlovsk)

    Pre-Soviet name

    Kharkiv Locomotive Factory(KhPZ), 1895

    Treasury iron foundry, 1801
    Putilov Factory, 1868

    Nizhny Novgorod Machine Factory, 1849

    Early Soviet name

    Kharkiv Diesel Factory

    Kharkiv Komintern Locomotive Factory, 1928

    Dzerzhinsky Ural Railroad Car Factory,Uralvagonzavod, (UVZ orVagonka), 1936

    Factory No. 185 (S.M. Kirov), 1935; originally a part ofBolshevik Factory No. 232

    Red Putilovite Plant, 1922
    renamedKirov Plant, 1934

    K.E. Voroshilov (Russian), 1932; originally a part ofBolshevik Factory No. 232

    Chelyabinsk Tractor Plant(ChTZ), 1933

    Dzerzhinsky Stalingrad Tractor Factory(STZ), 1930

    Krasnoye Sormovo(Andrei Zhdanov), 1920

    Ordzhonikidze Ural Heavy Machine Building Plant (UZTM), 1933

    Factory Number

    Factory No. 75

    Factory No. 183, 1936

    Factory No. 185

    Factory No. 100 until 1941

    Factory No. 174

    Factory No. 100, 1941

    Factory No. 112

    World War II

    Moved to Tankograd in Chelyabinsk, 1941

    KhPZ merged with Uralvagonzavodin Nizhny Tagil to form Ural Tank Factory No. 183 (I.V. Stalin), 1941;
    Became the world's largest tank factory.

    Partially moved to Tankograd in Chelyabinsk, 1941

    Partially[2]moved to Tankograd in Chelyabinsk, 1941

    Moved toChkalov, 1941;
    Moved again to Omsk, as Omsk Lenin Factory No. 174,1942

    Chelyabinsk Kirov Factory, unofficially known asTankograd

    Overran in the Battle of Stalingrad, 1942
     
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