The Last US Casualty of WW2

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by syscom3, Aug 18, 2010.

  1. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2005
    Messages:
    12,631
    Likes Received:
    309
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    Here's a great write up of the aerial encounter over Tokyo in which the last US casualty of WW2 happened.

    Its several pages long, so click on the link.

    The Last to Die | Military Aviation | Air Space Magazine

    Just after 2 p.m. on August 18, 1945, U.S. Army Sergeant Anthony J. Marchione bled to death in the clear, bright sky above Tokyo. A month shy of his 20th birthday, Marchione died like so many before him had in the Second World War—quietly, cradled in the arms of a buddy. What sets his death apart from that of other Allied airmen is that the young man from Pottstown, Pennsylvania, died after the Japanese had accepted the Allied terms of surrender. He was the last American killed in air combat in World War II.
     
  2. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2009
    Messages:
    24,064
    Likes Received:
    655
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Korporate Kontrolleur
    Location:
    South Carolina
    Hell of an honor, interesting post sys!
     
  3. Shinpachi

    Shinpachi Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Messages:
    6,782
    Likes Received:
    997
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    CGI Creator
    Location:
    Osaka
    It sounds as tragic as the last Kamikaze which was carried out after the Emperor's statement for surrender.
     
  4. michaelmaltby

    michaelmaltby Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2009
    Messages:
    3,873
    Likes Received:
    575
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Toronto
    Great read. Thanks for this. :)

    MM
     
  5. diddyriddick

    diddyriddick Active Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2009
    Messages:
    1,388
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Location:
    Hamlet, NC, US
    +1
     
  6. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2005
    Messages:
    12,631
    Likes Received:
    309
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Orange County, CA

    Admiral Ugaki?
     
  7. Capt. Vick

    Capt. Vick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Messages:
    7,871
    Likes Received:
    637
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Long Island, New York
    I guess the B-32's only claim to fame...
     
  8. Shinpachi

    Shinpachi Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Messages:
    6,782
    Likes Received:
    997
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    CGI Creator
    Location:
    Osaka
    #8 Shinpachi, Aug 18, 2010
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2010
    Yes, Ugaki the moron.
     
  9. Shinpachi

    Shinpachi Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Messages:
    6,782
    Likes Received:
    997
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    CGI Creator
    Location:
    Osaka
    #9 Shinpachi, Aug 18, 2010
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2010
    Ugaki was moron because -

    he was in the position to teach his men, all young pilots of around twenty, to survive for themselves and the future of their nation as the war was over.
    If he thought he had to die to take his responsibility for the Kamikaze tactics, he had other fair ways, like harakiri, to do so by himself.

    To the worse, in case of 2nd Lt. Shoichi Ohta who invented and suggested the suicide attack by infamous 'Ohka' - a human flying bomb, he flew a trainer without permission three days later the war was over. He kept flying aimlessly on the Pacific. He would have been going to die and was regarded as MIA finally. Pension was paid to his family.

    However, a researcher found him who was almost dying of cancer at a hospital in Kyoto fifty years later.
    He had been rescued by a fisherman and survived the rest of his life with a false name.
     
  10. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Messages:
    41,767
    Likes Received:
    684
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    A&P - Aircraft Technician
    Location:
    USA/Germany
    Sergeant Anthony J. Marchione

    :salute:
     
  11. KevinK.

    KevinK. Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2010
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Location:
    Belleville, IL
    Very touching story, but raises the question. Of why didn't US Army Command send up fighter cover? Or would fighters have violated terms of the Cease Fire?
     
  12. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2005
    Messages:
    12,631
    Likes Received:
    309
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    At that point in the war, Japanese fighter interception was rare. Who would have thought that after they announced the surrender, they would have an armed attack?
     
  13. parsifal

    parsifal Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2008
    Messages:
    10,676
    Likes Received:
    676
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Urban Design/Strategic Studies Tutor
    Location:
    Orange NSW
    any idea who shot him?
     
Loading...

Share This Page