Were you ever in the Armed Forces

Discussion in 'The NAAFI & PX' started by DerAdlerIstGelandet, Jun 15, 2005.

  1. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
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    I dont know much about SAMs except for the Russian ones, only because I had to deal with them quite a bit. We have a Patriot unit directly right outside of our airfield.
     
  2. Clave

    Clave Well-Known Member

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    http://www.ww2aircraft.net/forum/album_pic.php?pic_id=7252

    OMG!

    I have climbed that fence!

    A group of us from West Raynham (another Bloodhound station not far away) acted as bad guys for an exercise. We parked just down the road at night and walked down the beach until we reached the perimeter, some of went under (easy enough in the sandy soil) and some went over using a ladder, then we caused some mayhem, heh, I even had a fake bomb which I planted on one of the launchers. We got captured in the end after a brief firefight, but it was good fun, a bit like cowboys and indians with real guns. Oh, and jumping from the top of a fence in the dark, while carrying a loaded SLR is NOT highly recommended....
     
  3. Nonskimmer

    Nonskimmer Active Member

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    I did that back in basic training during a "game", with a C1 (practically the same as the L1A1). It's an adventure alright, if your not used to it.
     
  4. plan_D

    plan_D Active Member

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    My dad used to complain about those exercises; he used to inform the officers that terrorists weren't stupid enough to try and climb into a RAF base and plant bombs, they were just going to park outside and mortar the place.

    Did they listern? Nooo...RAF Finningley didn't even have a perimeter fence, you could drive straight through it. :rolleyes:
     
  5. Clave

    Clave Well-Known Member

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    Hmm, that sounds like a justifiable complaint.

    My dad was in the RAF a long time, and had actual experience with terrorists blowing the landing gear off Lightnings by wrapping plastic explosive round them.... but of course the methods have changed now, and mortars are much more likely. There was a mortar attack on Downing Street in 1991:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/10_Downing_Street

    Of course their all time favourite terrorist weapon is the RPG....
     
  6. plan_D

    plan_D Active Member

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    What did your dad do in the RAF? Did he work on Lightnings? My dad was in 11 Sqn....
     
  7. Clave

    Clave Well-Known Member

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    Yep, he was on the 'line' in a few places - Cyprus, Gan, Egypt, but mostly he was in charge of Lightning Simulators at Coltishall and I don't know what he worked on at Wattisham... Javelins maybe, I was a very young kid back then. Oh, just remembered, he worked on Canberras in Germany too, my sister was born there (Laarbruch)
     
  8. plan_D

    plan_D Active Member

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    Ah, my dad was aircraft electrician with 11 Sqn. Lightning for a while, went to Cyprus a three or four times with the squadron. Then went to 33 Sqn. Pumas..before getting on ASF with Chinooks (he was in teh first load of RAF electricians trained on 'em)...then he was with 22 Sqn. SAR wing in Leuchars before being posted to Coningsby with records (which he hated)..then to Finningley with SAR HQ and served sometime on their lone Nimrod. Served in Northern Ireland, various aircraft there, Gulf and Falklands with the Chinooks.
     
  9. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
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    Damn he has worked on a bit of aircraft.
     
  10. plan_D

    plan_D Active Member

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    He has. Off memory aircraft he's actually worked on (seeing in doesn't count, 'cos that'd be a silly long list);

    Lightning, Puma, Wessex, Sea King, Nimrod, Chinook, Domonie, Whirlwind and Techano.
     
  11. Clave

    Clave Well-Known Member

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    I must check what my dad did too, I'm sure there were quite a few that I missed...
     
  12. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
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    Im qualified to work on many different aircraft in the Army inventory but I only work with Blackhawks.
     
  13. marconi

    marconi Member

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    I'm studying on a military faculity in my University(besides my original profession) .My military specialization will be hydro acoustics if that is what is discussed here
     
  14. lesofprimus

    lesofprimus Active Member

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    Are u planning on going into the Ukraine Military after ur training is done, or are u already in???
     
  15. marconi

    marconi Member

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    No, after the university I'll be automatically transferred to reserve and I'll get the rank lieutenant.
     
  16. lesofprimus

    lesofprimus Active Member

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    OK sorta like our ROTC training... Good for u dude.... Pretty soon we'll be calling u Sir...
     
  17. marconi

    marconi Member

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    The funny thing about my training that it is mostly orienited on working on the submarine, yet Ukraine now has only 1 submarine and as I've heard they're planning to sell it to Russia or something like that.

    BTW what does ROTC mean?
     
  18. lesofprimus

    lesofprimus Active Member

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    What exactly does ROTC stand for?
    ROTC stands for Reserve Officers' Training Corps

    Why is there ROTC?
    ROTC commissions the majority of the U.S. Army's officers. Students who commit to military service may receive scholarships, monthly subsistence stipends, and other incentives to help them in college. Cadets who earn a commission may serve on active duty or may choose to serve in the National Guard or Army Reserve.

    Is the training at ROTC like being in Basic Training?
    Absolutely not. At ROTC you are an Army cadet. The ROTC program and the very name itself, Reserve Officer's Training Corps, train motivated, academically and physically qualified college students into becoming Army officers. The training methodology is entirely different then traditional Basic Training.

    What is the ROTC training schedule?
    The standard ROTC training schedule consists of three weekly PT sessions, one monthly lab, a 'field training exercise', FTX, each semester, and two social functions. At the labs, cadets will learn and practice skills ranging from basic drill and ceremony to light infantry tactics. All of these skills play an important role at the semester's FTX. Finally, the social functions are a fun time to bond with peers and instructors in a formal, but relaxed, environment.
     
  19. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
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    I was in JROTC but not in ROTC, but that is not quite the same.
     
  20. Rafe35

    Rafe35 Member

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    About two month ago, I almost joined the Marine Corps, but turn out that I got rejected because I'm deaf (Well, not totally deaf, just Hearing Impaired while wearing one hearing aid and one cochlear implants) and I'm still disappointed that I didn't get to join to serve my country.
     
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