What is this? (Luftwaffe im Focus 31)

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GrauGeist

Generalfeldmarschall zur Luftschiff Abteilung
Yeah, look at the one photo showing the four zoomed in.
They have an annular opening up front with no discernable blockages.

That's why my first impression was to allow airflow.
I have seen photos of the cable bobbins on the fins of their missiles, and they look similar.
 

Snautzer01

Honourably banned
30,893
34,458
Mar 26, 2007
That would not explain the shaping nor layout. One large weight would do just as well and would be simpler and have less drag. And we still have those openings on the front to explain.
perhaps but this is the luftwaffe. Have you have experience with project luftwaffe in detail? in genuine planes ? I have.
 

OldGeezer

Airman 1st Class
172
322
Dec 11, 2020
JATO units? Not like the ones usually seen on Luftwaffe machines, obviously. But I can't help thinking of B-47s using many small units instead of a few large ones.
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MiTasol

Chief Master Sergeant
4,474
6,156
Sep 19, 2012
Landing lights were invented long before ww2 and in the USAAF many aircraft that were not suitable for night flight, like P-39 and P-40 were fitted with them "just in case". The Hawk 75 had retractable landing lights as an option
Civil aircraft with landing lights in the US go back at least to the 1933 Boeing 247 and DC-1 and both British and French aircraft had Landing lights around the same time.

Germany was not a backward country so I am sure that there was no shortage of German aircraft pre-ww2 that had landing lights and my less than perfect memory is the prewar Messerschmidt Taifun had one in a fairing under the left wing.
 
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J_P_C

Senior Airman
618
1,456
Feb 21, 2010
Warsaw
well, i think coukd be i know what is this (result of morning commuting in public transportation 😄) - it is air sampling device, i know that germans have tried to make some intelligence conclusions from measuring pollution over English cities - its explaining recce unit designation on the airplane and openings at the front of the device
 

ww2restorer

Airman 1st Class
238
101
May 28, 2011
We know what landing lights are. In my statement I said MAYBE it is and experimental landing light setup and also that Stauffenberg was doing research on "low visibility" landing lights. Why low vis landing lights - because allied fighters would hang around air bases and as soon as and aircraft put on his lights for landing or taxi, the were i sitting target. We can see that the forward part appears solid, however the annular area behind is open, there could be a light. The German engineers were very intelligent.
 

Airframes

Benevolens Magister
61,318
9,556
Aug 24, 2008
Cheshire, UK
I'm wondering if these could possibly be para-illuminating flares ?
It's known that Luftwaffe aircraft sometimes dropped para-flares above a night bomber stream, to aid night-fighters, so maybe ??
 

special ed

Chief Master Sergeant
3,976
9,129
May 13, 2018
I found my tinfoil hat. It has been revealed to me the use of the devices in question. After reading other posts from a certain poster with an unusually shaped head, I received from the UFOs orbiting our planet, the information. These are air sampling devices used by recon units to detect radiation after nuke detonations. This is the only aircraft to survive flying through the cloud. I shall now neatly fold my tinfoil hat until the UFOs have another message.
 
19
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Sep 9, 2021
We know what landing lights are. In my statement I said MAYBE it is and experimental landing light setup and also that Stauffenberg was doing research on "low visibility" landing lights. Why low vis landing lights - because allied fighters would hang around air bases and as soon as and aircraft put on his lights for landing or taxi, the were i sitting target. We can see that the forward part appears solid, however the annular area behind is open, there could be a light. The German engineers were very intelligent.
Actually, were they aware of corner reflectors by the end of the war? I guess they must have been because I recall they used them to produce radar reflectors to confuse the H2S images over Berlin...

In this case the lights could be intended for use with corner reflectors along the runways. The British used these to land agents in europe. They would drop the reflectors to resistance forces who would find a nice area somewhere and lay down a line of them. The pilot would then wear - I kid you not - a flashlight on their head. The reflectors bounced the light directly back to them. It was practically invisible to anyone on the ground, but easily visible to the pilot. No one could see it from another plane because the light was going directly to and from the cubes - only someone exactly on the line between them would see it.

If these are lamps, and they are low visibility tests, then it might be for something similar - I highly directional low power lamp.

But... that doesn't explain their being four of them, nor the shape, nor why they just wouldn't put one on the cockpit so it's more inline.
 

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