1/48 scale?

Discussion in 'Modeling' started by Lucky13, Mar 28, 2013.

  1. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    My question is, why is there so few RAF light, medium or heavy bombers represented in 1/48, we're proper kits here and not short run? I mean, we have, even if old molds but still, B-17F/G, B-24 D/J, B-29, B-26 Marauder, A/B-26 Invader, A-20 Havoc, B-25 Mitchell, Junkers Ju 88's, He 111's, Do 217's, there's probably more...
    So, why no Hampdens, Halifaxes, Stirlings, Blenheims or some Russian and Japanese?
    With the popularity rising for the 1/32, how much would it have cost (just saying here) Revell, to a Halifax B.III or Stirling Mk.I/III in 1/48, or maybe to be more realistic, a Hampden or Blenheim? I'm glad to see their 1/32 scale Arado 96(?), Ju 88A-1, He 111P and He 219, don't get me wrong, but wouldn't some 1/48 RAF bombers been a good choice as well? Personally, I think (most likely wrong here but...), it can't be that much of a difference in cost making that 1/32 He 219 compared to a (daydreaming here...) B.III Halifax in 1/48, or? One thing is for sure, the Halifax served longer and even in a smaller scale, she would be massive and wouldn't a state of the art 1/48 Halifax outsell a 1/32 He 219?

    So, why is that we see so few of some aircraft (RAF bombers in this case), aircraft that did do a sterling service in WWII compared to others, never mind those safe 'bankers', it would be bl**dy nice to see something different for a change!
     
  2. Matt308

    Matt308 Glock Perfection
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    Because 1/72nd RRRRUUUULLLLLES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Bwaaahaaaahaaaahahaha

    [Sorry. Should've waited until someone gave some otherwise meaningless explanation of highly questionable merit. Carry on.]
     
  3. N4521U

    N4521U Well-Known Member

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    Cuz, 48 is too bloody big for them things. I have started doing 48th for all my single engine kits, and 72nd for all multi, and the B-24 is big. For the next GB I'm going to be doing a 1/72nd Lancaster. My 32nd Mustang is the same size as a 72nd Lanc. I saw the Box for a 1/48th Phantom, holey sh!te.

    Sorry, don't know why some kits aren't made in 48th......
     
  4. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    #4 Airframes, Mar 28, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2013
    With the relatively recent release of kits of 'large' aircraft in 1/32nd scale, and the apparent acceptance of these, judging by sales/popularity, I think that such aircraft as the Halifax might well appear in mainstream 1/48th scale - eventually.
    It should be remembered that, roughly thirty years ago, you could almost count the total number of 1/48th scale kits on the fingers of two hands. OK, maybe more than ten types, but not that many more, in full-time, general production.
    In the late 1970s, not including the then new Revell/Monogram releases of the B-26 etc, and the 'old' Monogram 'Quarter Scale' kits from the early 1960s, there were only three or four mainstream manufacturers producing a very small number1/48th scale kits, apart from ESCIs large range, and then with Airfix coming into play with a whole new range of what was then advanced, state of the art kits of the Spit, '109. Ju87, Mosquito etc, which surely influenced others to follow, but with the main kit market (for aircraft) still firmly and overwhelmingly dominated by 1/72nd scale.
    Unfortunately, regardless of manufacturer, the kits released generally have to appeal to a mass 'amateur' market, those who aren't 'modellers' as such, and can be anything from youngster to retired chap with a passing interest - hence more plastic Bf109s produced than the real thing!
    But, more and more manufacturers are taking the 'gamble', and releasing more kits of 'less popular' subjects (for want of a better term), although higher prices reflect, to an extent, their 'insurance', in order to get a good return, on the very costly investment, from the 'enthusiast' modeller.
    Bill may be partly correct, in that sheer size, in 1/48th scale, might be a factor - after all, the 'enthusiast' is more likely to have a fair collection of models in this scale, and perhaps might baulk at buying, for example, a Halifax, or even an available B-24, purely because of space requirements within that collection, whereas those who buy, say, a 1/32nd scale He-111 might do so as a 'one off', perhaps as a centre-piece, or perhaps as the only model, where it might be displayed in glorious isolation.
    I agree though, it can be irritating to see yet another Bf109, or FW 190 or P-51, when there are still many 'achievable' (and saleable) subjects which could be covered in 1/48th scale, especially since this scale is certainly growing rapidly in popularity, year by year. I can think of quite a number of WW2 types, available in 1/72nd scale, still not yet given enough exposure in the larger scale, and when it comes to civilian types - those which would fall off the shelves faster than they go on the shelves - then the list is even longer!
     
  5. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

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    #5 A4K, Apr 1, 2013
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2013
    Yep, in addition to Terry's, I reckon 1) Matt's right :D

    2) The European and NZ/Aussie markets used to be dominated by 1:72, while the US always loved it's 'quarter scale'. This could be a price thing I don't know; one article I read suggested it stemmed from the units of measurement used.

    What is sure is that before internet came along, markets were not nearly so open as they are now. Manufacturers (very generally speaking) concentrated on local markets, thus US produced kits were mostly US/German types, European kits of much wider scope.
    The first time I saw a British bomber in 1:48 personally was around '87: the Tamiya Lancaster kits.
     
  6. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    As it seems both the 1/48 and 1/32 are growing in popularity, it would be nice to some new, outside the box thinking, when it comes to new kits and not just as short run ones!
     
  7. herman1rg

    herman1rg Well-Known Member

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    What about more in 1/24 scale?
     
  8. Catch22

    Catch22 Well-Known Member

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    Trumpeter did a bunch fairly recently, but I don't think the quality was great, and the prices are very high. That may be a limiting factor.
     
  9. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Yep, similar reasons as to those given in my original reply. Also, in 1/24th scale, although it's possible today to mould larger components, sheer size - and therefore available display space - will dictate, to an extent, sales volumes. Three or four 'fighter-size' 1/24th scale models need the room of twice that many 1/48th scale models of the same subject, so, the average modeller may have one or two 1/24th scale as 'special' or 'center-piece' exhibits, but is unlikely to have a large collection.
    As an example, I have around 15 or so 1/32nd scale 'fighter-size' models, which fill one cabinet, and around forty 1/48th scale single and twin-engined models which fill the same sized cabinet, and a couple of shelves. I would like to add some large aircraft, such as a Lancaster, but would need a custom-made cabinet in which to fit it, or other similar models.
    I have only one model in 1/24th scale - and don't know where to put it!
    Working in this larger scale can only be realistically confined to 'fighter-sized' aircraft, unless one has a very large house, with large, custom-made display cabinets, or for museum display.
    Those wishing to have a reasonable to large collection, of varied types and sizes of aircraft, tend to stay with the more manageable 1/72 nd scale, which is why it is still the most popular, and dominant, scale for aircraft models.
     
  10. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

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    Agree completely. Size, price and range of subjects are the key factors in my collection.
    Due to the number and variety of types in my 2 main modelling themes (NZPAF/ RNZAF and Luftwaffe 1939-45), about 90% of my kits are 1:72. I do have some 1:48, 1:32, 1:35 and 1:24 kits of favourite subjects,but very rarely do I buy in these scales.
     
  11. Andremil

    Andremil New Member

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    The fact that a 1/32 B-17G is coming out just now, after hugely successful B-25s, He-111s and Ju-88s, pretty much blows to bits the notion that multi-engine types in 1/48th are too big... I think there is a snob factor associated with 1/32 in that it is an expert scale by definition: Modellers today want a huge number of parts and don't want anything that is remotely entry scale or easily accessible in appearance... To be more precise, because 1/32 is the largest "practical" scale, with the newer range of widespread kit releases, it is seen as the premium scale... 1/32 used to be bigger but worse in detail quality than 1/48th (in the 70s), but now the attitude has completely reversed and 1/48th is a scale of newcommer manufacturers, abandoned by all the more prestigious brands: Hasegawa hasn't made a WWII type in 4 years, so is completely out, and Tamiya's overpriced Il-2 was their first in nearly four years as well... Only Airfix, Italeri and Zvezda are still taking 1/48th seriously without being complete newcommers like Meng or GW... A.
     
  12. Andremil

    Andremil New Member

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    The fact that a 1/32 B-17G is coming out just now, after hugely successful B-25s, He-111s and Ju-88s, pretty much blows to bits the notion that multi-engine types in 1/48th are too big... I think there is a snob factor associated with 1/32 in that it is an expert scale by definition: Modellers today want a huge number of parts and don't want anything that is remotely entry scale or easily accessible in appearance... To be more precise, because 1/32 is the largest "practical" scale, with the newer range of widespread kit releases, it is seen as the premium scale... 1/32 used to be bigger but worse in detail quality than 1/48th (in the 70s), but now the attitude has completely reversed and 1/48th is a scale of newcomer manufacturers, abandoned by all the more prestigious brands: Hasegawa hasn't made a WWII type in 4 years, so is completely out, and Tamiya's overpriced Il-2 was their first in nearly four years as well... Only Airfix, Italeri and Zvezda are still taking 1/48th seriously without being complete newcomers like Meng or GW... Revell is very occasional and is the only one that "specializes" in multi-engine, once in a blue moon... A.
     
  13. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    I disagree to an extent. The increase in 1/32nd scale is similar to the emergence of 1/48th scale - which started to increase in the late 1970s, then lapsed for awhile, before growing rapidly, and continuing to grow. The same has happened with 1/32nd scale, with more, and larger models emerging, and I don't believe it has anything to do with a 'premium' scale, or number of parts - a 'real' modeller will look at the shape and accuracy of the kit overall, with a view to making what is required if necessary, and if the kit has got lots of parts, that may, or may not, be a bonus. The proportions of sales would be interesting to see, with these spread among 'expert' modellers, casual modellers and total novices
    It's a case of preference and available storage or display space, and many of the larger scale models are actually aimed at 'non modellers', the thinking behind the marketing being that a large model of a large aircraft, with enough basic detail to satisfy the average viewer, will attract another market niche, and sales to enthusiast modellers will cap that.
    And as for Hasegawa not releasing anything new, with their vast range, they can re-release a 40 year old kit, with a new decal sheet, and demand an increase in price of up to 300%, and make a veru nice profit - without the huge investment in research, tooling, manufacture and marketing.
    And I don't believe anyone said that large aircraft types are too big for 1/32nd scale - there are many who would lobe a 1/32nd scale B-17 or Lancaster, and I'm one of them - but the reality is a bit different, wanting, and being able to display it are two different things !
    Yes, these kits will sell, of course they will, but there'll be few who can afford the space required to have even a medium-sized collection of, say, WW2 aircraft types all in this scale. Heck, even my 1/48th scale B-17 takes up three quarters of one display cabinet shelf!
     
  14. silence

    silence Active Member

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    I don't know if this counts as out-of-the-box, but Tamiya has a 1/48 Lanc that can be built carrying either a Grand Slam or a Dambuster. (I'm jonesing for this kit, personally)
     
  15. silence

    silence Active Member

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    I wonder how the 1/200 Bismarck kit is selling?....
     
  16. fubar57

    fubar57 Well-Known Member

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    From what I've read, it's inaccurate and over-priced.

    Geo
     
  17. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    If Airfix can do as good an Lancaster as they can do in 1/72, I'm sure that they can do a h*lluva good one in 1/48 and send Tamiya packing, the more I look at their new one, the more I like it!
    Heck, if I could afford it, had the money, I'd pay the work to get one done.... :D
     
  18. mikewint

    mikewint Well-Known Member

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    I'm with Terry on this one. ALL my WWII aircraft are 1/48. To my wy of looking at things, 1/72 is too small and lacks detail (sorry Matt). The bigger scales 1/32 have, of course, more detail but now require more display space. Again, to me, 1/48 splits the difference between detail and display space. But, as stated earlier, a 1/48 4-engine bomber is a big kit as I found out with my 1/48 B-29. None of my display cases would hold it so it is on a shelf in my library.
    Now, we all have favorite models and as such one or two in larger scale may be included but I, again personally, like to see comparisons and mixing scales distorts that ability to make 1:1 comparisons. Now with my tank collection I shifted to 1/35 or 1/32 to show the detail I wanted. However, the Tiger, a favorite is also in 1/24 as is my Abrams
     
  19. Matt308

    Matt308 Glock Perfection
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    No apologies necessary. 1/72nd is my scale for a very simple reason. It most closely matched my matchbox cars and HO scale train (1/87th if I recall) when I was a kid and wanted to play with them all together. Differences in toy scale bothered me and I would refuse to play with other kids who mixed and matched. Engineer from day one I guess. :toothy5: Besides to my young eyes 1/48 and especially 1/32 with all the additional details showed flaws or lack of realism to readily with young modelling skills.
     
  20. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    That's interesting Matt. I was exactly the same as a kid - all my models were 1/72nd scale, not that there was much choice back then, at the time when Moses was still a Corporal!
    Like you, I had a model railway layout (in 'OO' scale, or 1/76th approx.), so all the cars, buildings, and aircraft on the model airfield inside the tracks just had to match.
    I couldn't stand it, or understand it, when friends had different scales and sizes all mixed up, and no 'eye' for scale or proportion. Even then, as a seven year old, I was fascinated by things in miniature, and used to get down low, to view the models, the railway and buildings, at 'scale eye level', trying to arrange things as realistically as possible, with the materials and kits of the day.
     
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