B-26 Question.

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by B-17engineer, Oct 9, 2009.

  1. B-17engineer

    B-17engineer Active Member

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    I was watching a documentary on the Ju-88 and it talked about how the allies were trying to bring in bombers to match the Luftwaffe bombing capabilities. It first talked about the B-25 and then said," the B-26 was not as versatile and at times hard to handle

    What was hard to handle about it? I'm not questioning it, just curious.
     
  2. vanir

    vanir Banned

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    I've read this before, if I remember right it was a high wing loading for poor low speed handling, and the fact Langley was the first to get them in 1940 and replaced the B-18 with them, which was quite a change (double the landing speed).
    The wing was later modified during production, someone more knowledgeable should have details. The B-26 was initially ordered directly off the drawing board and no prototypes were built, though the first production batch was used for testing and training.
    At first, due to an initial spate of landing accidents and a poor reputation among 22nd BG pilots for heavy handling, the B-26 got a bit of a reputation as a widowmaker, but later versions are described as excellent and it is often said the reputation was largely undeserving. RAF orders also had the early short wing, so Marauder MkI's had the same early series problems and lack of popularity.
     
  3. beaupower32

    beaupower32 Well-Known Member

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    #3 beaupower32, Oct 9, 2009
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2009

    Quoted from Wikipedia. Hope this helps.
     
  4. MikeGazdik

    MikeGazdik Member

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    What was posted was I most remember reading about the Marauder. I really think it was a leap in performance. From seat of pants flying to flying by the numbers. The performance of the plane was great, but the early planes were very unforgiving of improper handling at the slower speeds during landing and take-off. This was primarily due to the short span of the wings.

    Later planes, I forget which mark, had increased span and I think the angle of incidence of the wing to help its low speed regime.
     
  5. B-17engineer

    B-17engineer Active Member

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    Many thanks for the responses guys!
     
  6. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    The B-26 had a very high wing loading and landed very fast when compared to some of the other twin engine aircraft of the day. As I've mentioned repeatedly on this forum, it seem the USAAF did not have an effective twin training program until after the war started. Twin engine aircraft can kill you very quickly, especially during an engine failure during take off.
     
  7. B-17engineer

    B-17engineer Active Member

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    Oh, I see. On take off if the engine failed, what would the aircraft do? So on take off if the engine failed it was a problem, but in the air, like Jimmy Doolittle tested, the aircraft could fly on one engine?
     
  8. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    When a pilot has an engine failure on takeoff in a twin engine aircraft he or she must act quickly to counter the effects of "dead" engine. If nothing is quickly done, the aircraft tends to yaw and roll into the dead engine and can eventually roll upside down. Many people have died in WW2 and even in later years because they weren't properly trained or they did not maintain proficiency in practicing engine out emergencies.


    Generally here are the steps involved in countering a lost engine on take off.

    1. identify failure
    2. Counter yaw with rudder
    3. Bank toward dead engine
    4. Raise landing gear
    5. Lower the nose to ensure airspeed
    6. Positively identify the engine and feather the prop. After that shut fuel off to the engine if fire is suspect.

    When twin engine aircraft are being developed there are 2 things always determined.

    1. Minimum Airborne Control speed - this is the minimum airspeed at which directional control can be maintained under the following conditions: maximum gross weight, center of gravity [C of G] at the maximum aft position, sea level, flaps set to the takeoff position, landing gear retracted, operating engine developing maximum power, critical engine failed and windmilling, a maximum of 5 degrees of bank towards the good engine.

    2. Best single rate of climb on one engine - Best rate of climb speed with a single operating engine in a twin-engine aircraft – the speed that provides the most altitude gain per unit of time following an engine failure.


    So all this must be considered when loosing an engine on take off when flying a twin engine aircraft.

    NOW - as for the B-26. At altitude, can it fly on a single engine? I believe so.

    BTW - on the P-38, you had to also REDUCE power on the good engine to ensure proper control if you lost an engine during take off.
     
  9. B-17engineer

    B-17engineer Active Member

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    Many thanks for the explanation! Clears a lot up! :D
     
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