China rewrites history of Korean War

Discussion in 'Post-War' started by Colin1, Jun 26, 2010.

  1. Colin1

    Colin1 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2009
    Messages:
    3,541
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    Engineer and overgrown schoolboy
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    #1 Colin1, Jun 26, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2010
    The Daily Telegraph Saturday 26 June 2010

    Beijing marks 60th anniversary of conflict by pointing the finger at its Communist ally

    By Malcolm Moore
    in Shanghai


    China has used the 60th anniversary of the Korean War to finally admit the conflict was started by North Korea. Until now, Beijing has staunchly supported the version of events put forward by its ally, alongside which China fought.

    It previously insisted that the war was waged to fight off American aggression. The official title of the conflict has been 'The War to Resist America and Aid Korea'. Mao Tse Tung, the former Communist leader, once stated that China and North Korea were "as close as lips and teeth".

    Chinese history text books state that the Korean War began when "the United States assembled a United Nations army of 15 countries and defiantly marched across the border and invaded North Korea, spreading the flames of war to our Yalu river".

    But yesterday, the official Chinese media stated for the first time that it was North Korea that dealt the first blow.

    A special report by Xinhua, the Chinese government's official news agency, in the International Affairs journal, said, "On June 25th 1950, the North Korean army marched over the 38th Parallel and started the attack. Three days later, Seoul fell".

    In Asia, however, the memory of the war is still felt strongly and has sustained a continuing alliance between Beijing and Pyongyang. While many Chinese historians privately accept the view that North Korea was the aggressor in the war, driven by Kim Il Sung's desire to unite the Korean peninsula under a Communist banner, the matter remains highly sensitive.

    Zhang Liangui, a leading professor of Korean Studies at the Communist Central Party School in Beijing, refused to comment. "It is not convenient for me to comment on this matter" he said "I was not aware of this timeline [in the Xinhua article]. As far as I am aware there has been no change to the official view on the war".

    Meanwhile, the Global Times, a government-run newspaper, said it was "high time to renew and strengthen efforts by Chinese scholars to discover the truth about the Korean War".

    In Seoul, South Korea held an official ceremony to remember the war and Lee Myung-bak, the president, paid tribute to the dead. "Sixty years ago, North Korea's communists opened fire on a weekend's dawn when all people were sleeping peacefully" he said.

    Across the border, North Korea put across its own view of the conflict. Under the headline "US, Provoker of Korean War" the country's state news agency accused Washington of starting the war with a surprise attack. "All the historical facts show that it is the US imperialists who unleashed the war in Korea and that the United States can never escape from the responsibility" the Korean Central News Agency said.

    Below: Americans are held by Chinese Communists. The conflict was called 'The War to Resist America and Aid Korea'
     

    Attached Files:

  2. evangilder

    evangilder "Shooter"
    Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2004
    Messages:
    19,419
    Likes Received:
    137
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    Network Engineer/Photographer
    Location:
    Moorpark, CA
    Home Page:
    Interesting change on the stance by China. The timing of this is equally interesting. Could Beijing be preparing to distance itself from Pyonyang?
     
  3. BombTaxi

    BombTaxi Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2004
    Messages:
    1,907
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Location:
    Barnsley, S. Yorks, UK
    I think Beijing may be starting to see good relations with the West as being more important than good relations with NK...
     
  4. ppopsie

    ppopsie Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2006
    Messages:
    461
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Occupation:
    to read and receive
    Location:
    East end
  5. Ferdinand Foch

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2008
    Messages:
    816
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Occupation:
    College Student, sometimes a stock clerk
    Location:
    Stafford Springs, Connecticut
    Well, that would be nice if China distanced itself from North Korea. That Kim Jong Il fellow's a bloody whackjob. Him and all of his little cronies.
     
  6. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2009
    Messages:
    24,072
    Likes Received:
    655
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Korporate Kontrolleur
    Location:
    South Carolina
    I did not see this one coming, but it's a welcomed change.
     
  7. ppopsie

    ppopsie Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2006
    Messages:
    461
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Occupation:
    to read and receive
    Location:
    East end
    #7 ppopsie, Jun 27, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2010
    I love the Mig-15bis flown by flight leader Wan Hai PLAAF #2249 and Soviet's #15325 BBC "Airplane Soldier."
    But I love the F-86 Sabres too (that is, I love the either jet fighter).
    Recommended reading; Sabre Jets over Korea by D.K. Evans http://www.librarything.com/work/9337232
    This book was so exciting that I nearly collided with another car while I was driving my Subaru at the same time was daydreaming over the book about a scene of the sky full of Sabres and Migs dogfighting.
     
  8. Colin1

    Colin1 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2009
    Messages:
    3,541
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    Engineer and overgrown schoolboy
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    a bit random... :)
     
  9. ppopsie

    ppopsie Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2006
    Messages:
    461
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Occupation:
    to read and receive
    Location:
    East end
    One thing I learned from "Red Wings over the Yalu" is that communist China lost opportunities to liberate Taiwan in early 50's.
     
  10. Gnomey

    Gnomey World Travelling Doctor
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Messages:
    41,750
    Likes Received:
    518
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Doctor
    Location:
    Portsmouth / Royal Deeside, UK
    Home Page:
    Yep.
     
  11. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2005
    Messages:
    12,631
    Likes Received:
    309
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    Interesting.

    I agree that the PRC is seeing that good relations with the west (and its economic dependence on them) is far more profitable than having an out of control NK making troubles in the region.
     
  12. BombTaxi

    BombTaxi Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2004
    Messages:
    1,907
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Location:
    Barnsley, S. Yorks, UK
    NK is never going to but vast quantities of consumer goods from the PRC, after all. The Chinese have no choice to distance themselves if they want more contracts from big American companies like Apple etc.
     
  13. tango35

    tango35 Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2005
    Messages:
    208
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Occupation:
    Marketing
    Location:
    Hannover Region
    #13 tango35, Jul 4, 2010
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2010
    The Chinese are like the Russians, coldheart commies in sheep clothings and so i trust them as far as i can throw a stone - and i can´t throw far away; i would see a change in chinese politics when they rereat from Tibet and a change in their " relationship" to Taiwan
     
  14. renrich

    renrich Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2007
    Messages:
    4,542
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    real estate
    Location:
    Montrose, Colorado
    China and the West, particularely the US have a symbiotic relationship. China needs the US markets and the US needs Chinese financing. The US is transforming itself into more of a socialist country, like China and China is becoming more of a capitalist country. If it were my choice, I would trust China much more than Russia.
     
  15. Thorlifter

    Thorlifter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2004
    Messages:
    7,907
    Likes Received:
    189
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    IT Nerd
    Location:
    Dallas, Tx Jubail, Saudi Arabia
    As far as China is concerned, who would you prefer to have friendly relations with? The U.S. or NK? NK really doesn't have much to offer.

    @Renrich: I agree the U.S. is becoming more socialist, especially with that (self censored) president we have. Maybe that will change in a couple years.
     
  16. renrich

    renrich Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2007
    Messages:
    4,542
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    real estate
    Location:
    Montrose, Colorado
    Absolutely agree, Thorlifter, with both your statements. I don't believe the rulers of China today are nearly the idealogues that once ran things there.
     
  17. Zniperguy114

    Zniperguy114 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2010
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Location:
    Pennslyvannia
    Sure, you can call China Communist still, but not really be correct in saying that. China doesn't really have a dictator, but more or less a monarchy in its own sense. It is not the Iron Fisted Rule it was. If China was truly Communist, would they really have open relations with us?Because they realized along with us that only death and destruction can come from standing up against one another. A prime example of that is the "what if" The Cuban Missile Crisis lead to WWIII. I'm glad to welcome Change in China's early feelings on us. We depend on each other.
     
  18. Colin1

    Colin1 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2009
    Messages:
    3,541
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    Engineer and overgrown schoolboy
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    #18 Colin1, Jul 6, 2010
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2010
    Well
    we'll see; personally, I think China learned alot of lessons on how not to do Communism from it's next-door neighbour - isolationism badly damaged USSR agriculture, it was interesting to note in Gorbachev's autobiography that, on a visit to the USA and Canada, the Soviet farm collectives were suffering near-identical problems to their North American counterparts.

    Couple of your points I don't understand; you don't need a figure-head (dictator) to be a dictatorship and what's your analogy with a monarchy?

    As for iron-fisted rule, you'd need a short memory to rule Tiananmen Square out of any argument on that score. More recently, why can't the Chinese just google anything they want?

    The points of Tibet and Taiwan have already been made.

    My own personal feelings are that China is truly Communist but engaging the outside world in free trade; Capitalism on their terms. I don't think China has feelings for the West one way or the other, they just realise that their fate is inextricably linked with us commercially, with Chinese goods/commodities/hardware/enterprises competing with ours (more cheaply) they'll avoid what the USSR failed to see coming - stagnation driving public indifference to their political system.

    A well-fed, well-heeled population with lots of lifestyle toys that is plugged in to the outside world (to the approved extent) is far less likely to start a revolution.
     
  19. Matt308

    Matt308 Glock Perfection
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2005
    Messages:
    20,140
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Occupation:
    Engineer
    Location:
    Washington State
    Wow. I can't believe I just read that.
     
  20. BombTaxi

    BombTaxi Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2004
    Messages:
    1,907
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Location:
    Barnsley, S. Yorks, UK
    Without getting too political, China is certainly not a truly communist country, as it permits a significant level of free enterprise - as we have been discussing, this is necessary for the country's future prosperity, and the Party knows that only too well. It certainly isn't a monarchy, but I would peg it as an increasingly oligarchic autocratic state. In fact, in some respects it begins to resemble the West as it moved into the early stages of unrestricted capitalism.

    By the way, the idea that communist and capitalist countries cannot maintain relations is little more than a propagandist myth perpetrated by both sides during the Cold War. The USSR maintained diplomatic relations with capitalist nations before the Civil War was even over, and if you think about Leninist (and especially Trotskyite) dogma, this makes perfect sense. Communism (in the strictly dogmatic sense) arises from the dissatisfaction of workers in capitalist nations with unrestricted free markets, so it makes sense to maintain ties with those countries as a means of inserting or cultivating subversive elements to further the spread of the revolution, which was an end in itself in Trotsky's thinking.
     
Loading...

Share This Page