Development of camouflage....

Discussion in 'WW2 General' started by Lucky13, Mar 26, 2013.

  1. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    Who did most for the development of camouflage in WWII, uniforms etc., was it Germany, how much did get out there and how much did never leave the drawingboard?
     
  2. michaelmaltby

    michaelmaltby Well-Known Member

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    #2 michaelmaltby, Mar 26, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2013
  3. yulzari

    yulzari Active Member

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    One could point to tweed but much, much earlier.
     
  4. vinnye

    vinnye Member

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    Maybe you could point to the ghillie suits worn by British snipers in WW1 ?
     
  5. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    Or just plain simple Khaki ?

    Steve
     
  6. michaelmaltby

    michaelmaltby Well-Known Member

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    "... Khaki "

    An Urdu word from India, IIRC

    MM
     
  7. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    Certainly one of the Indian languages. I've seen it variously translated as dust or soil coloured which is pretty self explanatory in terms of camouflage.

    Not to be confused with Khazi (which may or may not have a Zulu derivation) which is something entirely different :)

    Steve
     
  8. yulzari

    yulzari Active Member

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    #8 yulzari, Mar 26, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2013
    Or with the Khasi of Khalabar which out to (but doesn't) lead into the old joke about the shoemakers who provided the Khasi with his shoes and, sadly, advertised themselves with the sign 'Cobblers to the Khasi'.

    But we digress.

    Treading on potentially delicate ground, were the excellent Portugese regiments who operated in support of Lord Wellesley in the Peninsula War not known as 'Cacadores' and dressed in brown uniforms? Highly thought of by their British colleagues as befits Britain's oldest allies.

    But still we digress from WW2.
     
  9. Civettone

    Civettone Active Member

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    The Germans copied it from the Italians. They were the first to mass produce camouflage fabric for clothing and tents and the likes. Called Telo Mimetico Mod. 29.


    Kris
     
  10. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    It could have been Robin Hood, with his 'cloth of Lincoln Green' ..................
     
  11. N4521U

    N4521U Well-Known Member

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    Khaki....................... dusty.

    When the British wore red coats in the desert and got dirty they were more difficult to see, and started making Khaki color uniforms. IIRC
     
  12. yulzari

    yulzari Active Member

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    #12 yulzari, Jun 12, 2013
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2013
    Just to confirm my pedantry qualifications: the Lincoln 'Green' was actually Lincoln 'Grain'. A red colour from Kermes insects imported possibly from Poland. The purpose in the legend was to infer the success of Robin Hood's men (that great Yorkshireman from the forest of Barnsely) by showing them dressed in the most expensive colour. This was the same reason as Cardinals wore red and the Virgin Mary's clothes were in red in the early days of european painting, until the Venetians began to import lapis lazuli blue from Afghanistan which was beautiful and even more expensive than red paint pigments.

    But perhaps I digress from WW2?

    Did I mention that I once had lunch with the Sheriff of Nottingham in his modest bungalow just off the ring road?
     
  13. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Well, well! So the cloth wasn't green at all! And all this time I thought old Robin had used his noggin, and outfitted his Combat Group .... er, band of merry men, with an early form of DPM! And they were 'merry', I suppose, due to all that mead! Merry? P*ssed as a parrot more like!
     
  14. nincomp

    nincomp Member

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    I understand that we Americans had bad luck with camouflage during WWII. If I remember correctly, some marines were issued forest camo in the pacific, but the pattern faded quickly and soon became more visible than khakis.

    The Germans wore camouflage. When some American troops were issued forest camos they kept coming under friendly fire. I guess that it is better to be seen by the enemy than being killed by friends.
     
  15. pattle

    pattle Member

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    For me the Italians were the gods of camouflage when I see the way they painted their aircraft.
     
  16. nincomp

    nincomp Member

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    What aircraft? Oh, wait a minute. That explains why I never see anything when members post photos of Italian aircraft.:p
     
  17. pattle

    pattle Member

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    #17 pattle, Jun 14, 2013
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2013
    Are you are having a tin bath? you must have seen pictures of camouflaged Italian aircraft before? What aircraft? Just do a google image search for sm79, mc2000, Fiat CR42 or just about any other WW2 pre-armistice Italian Aircraft and you will see that they are mostly painted in three colour camouflage schemes.
     
  18. Civettone

    Civettone Active Member

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    Pattle, it was a joke ...


    (not seeing aircraft because they were camouflaged)
    Kris
     
  19. nincomp

    nincomp Member

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    What he said.
    I merely intended to take your valid comment about the excellent camouflage and blow it up to a humorously absurd level - invisible aircraft. I guess it was not as humorous as I thought.:(

    Sometimes my jokes are much funnier to me than to anyone else. Sorry, I meant no disrespect.
     
  20. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    One of the earliest accounts of camouflage was Julius Caesar's scout ships, used during the Gallic Wars (about 54 b.c.), when they were painted "Venetian Blue" for scouting the British coast. The crews aboard (sailors and marines) were uniformed in the same blue-green color.
     
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