Future projects...

Discussion in 'Questions on Kits, Decals, Tools and Pilots' started by Lucky13, Nov 11, 2012.

  1. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    Being one who's always looking some interesting builds, 13's or not, I found this one....

    B-17F-20-BO "Fighting Swede" Serial Number 41-24520

    USAAF
    5th AF
    43rd BG
    63rd BS


    Pilot: Major Robert N. Keatts, O-381156 (MIA / KIA) ID
    Co-Pilot: 1st Lt William E. Ward, O-725386 (MIA / KIA) CA
    Navigator: 2nd Lt John P. Murnane, O-790983 (MIA / KIA) NY
    Bombardier: M/Sgt Richard G. Tennant, 15012411 (MIA / KIA) WV
    Engineer: T/Sgt Charles Kachigian, 6718892 (MIA / KIA) PA
    Asst Engineer: Sgt Dilman J. Beerwert, 15059026 (MIA / KIA) IN
    Radio: Cpl John T. Mannion, 12021941 (MIA / KIA) NY
    Asst Radio: S/Sgt Bernard E. Parker, 17030208 (MIA / KIA) KS
    Tail Gunner: Sgt William S. Bates, 12031947 (MIA / KIA) NY
    Photographer: Pfc Frank D. Goodwin, Jr., 14063639 (MIA / KIA) TN
    MIA: May 8, 1943 at 9:13am
    MACR: 13689 (15689)

    Aircraft History
    Built by Boeing at Seattle. Delivered to the US Army on July 24, 1942, and assigned to the 43rd Bombardment Group, 403rd Bombardment Squadron. Next, assigned to the 63rd Bombardment Squadron. Nicknamed "Flying Swede" in honor of the pilot, Lt. Folmer J. Sogaard, who was Swedish.

    This B-17 flew its first combat mission on September 14, 1942. On April 20 1943 flew a mission against Wewak, piloted by Sugared skip bombing a tanker which was "burning fiercely" and "definitely sunk", then bombed the airfield. Only other shipping damage claimed on that mission was Lt William O'Brien in B-17F "Talisman" claiming two "very near misses" on another ship.

    Mission History
    Took off from 7-Mile Drome near Port Moresby at 0640am on a armed reconnaissance mission to Madang and Saidor on the northern coast. Its last reported position was 50 miles north of Madang, when it reported Japanese shipping, at 0900 hours, then never reported again. Subsequent searches both at the time and after the war yielded no signs of the crew and plane.

    Some members of the 63rd BS heard that Radio Tokyo reported an incident on the 8th of May in which a Japanese fighter pilot had rammed a B-17. This led to speculation that this was the cause of Keats otherwise unexplained loss.

    It is reported that a US Army Lieutenant was also aboard this plane. He is not listed above, nor is there any mention of his presence in the MACR. It is unclear if there was an extra crew member aboard.

    Japanese Side
    In fact, at 9:13am this B-17 was intentionally rammed by an attacking Ki-43 Oscar, claiming his life.

    "Wewak - The Early Days" by Richard Dunn adds:
    "...nine Type 1 fighters of the 11th FR under Capt. Takashi Ninomiyo, commander of the 1st chutai. These encountered the B-17 while en route to cover the ships. Three Type 1 fighters under Lt. Junji Kobayashi broke off and attacked the B-17 initiating their first pass from slightly above and then completing additional head on passes. Though damaged, the B-17 headed for some of the clouds and rain squalls in the area. Unwilling to let the B-17 escape, Sgt. Tadao Oda commenced a head on pass that ended in a collision. Both the B-17 and the fighter fell into the sea in flames. There were no survivors. The Americans had no idea what happened to the B-17 flown by Lt. Robert Keats and his crew. Oda was lionized in the Japanese press for deliberately ramming and destroying the big bomber. He was promoted to Lieutenant posthumously."

    Army Bomber: Boeing B-17F Stateside Flight

    B-17F 41-24520 over Port Moresby

    Crew Members of B-17F "Fighting Swede" 41-24520
     
  2. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    F-4-1-LO Lightning Serial Number 41-2098 Tail 98

    USAAF
    5th AF
    6th PRG
    8th PRS


    Pilot: Andrew W. Peterson, O-438657 (MIA / KIA) ND
    MIA: September 14, 1942

    Aircraft History
    Constructors Number 222-5316. Shipped overseas to Australia. Assembled by CAC at Melbourne on September 2, 1942. Assigned to the 6th Photographic Reconnaissance Group, 8th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron.

    On September 4, 1942 pilot Thomas ferried F4 41-2156 and Fred Hargesheimer piloted this aircraft from Melbourne to Stock Route Airfield near Townsville.

    Wartime History
    Took off at 6:00am from 14 Mile Drome (Schwimmer) a reconnaissance mission against north-east New Guinea and the Buna area.

    8th Photo Squadron Diary Harlan H. Olsen, Monday - September 14, 1942
    "Tragedy is certainly dogging our boys. Lt. Peterson departed at 0600 in 2098 for dawn patrol of northeast New Guinea, and nothing more was heard from him. After checking the airdromes, Major Polifka took off in search of him, but a general overcast at 5,000 feet made observation impossible. Pete is a swell person, one of the regular guys, and he will be sorely missed. These first missions are exceedingly difficult. The weather is always bad, and with no experience over the terrain, navigation is mostly by guess and by God. Best of luck Pete, we shall pray that you walk out.”

    This aircraft was officially condemned October 31, 1944. SOC Jan 9, 1945.

    Question: Is the F-4 version of the P-38, basically an E, with a reconnaissance nose?
     
  3. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    Any interesting projects in the pipeline lads?
     
  4. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Yep.
    Twenty 1/48th scale models for my BoB 'Hardest Day' collection, another eight for my '56 Squadron Collection', a few 'trainers' revolving around a 4 FTS theme, a couple of 'D-Day and beyond' small dioramas, the still not started 'JG26, 1944' diorama, a couple of un-finished commissions, some more RAF jets, additions to the 'Bare Metal' collection, to include the Fennec currently underway, a Mirage IIIC and a F-100 and MiG 19 to join the F-86, F-84 and MiG21, a RAF Mitchell III diorama, USAAF 8th AF B-24 diorama, a SOE Lysander diorama, Swiss F-5E diorama ....... need I go on?
    Let's see now - at an average of six models per year, but allowing for further degeneration of my hands, so maybe three per year, that's ..... ah, b*ll*cks, I'll be pushing up daffodils before I reach the end of the planned projects !!!
     
  5. silence

    silence Active Member

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    I used to have a collection of 109s in the colors of various aces. I think there were like 8 or 10, including several you don't normally hear about, like Schroer and Luetzow.

    Sadly they've been in a box since I moved in '09. I'm kinda scared to dig them out and having to see the damage done.
     
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