Royal Marines Do Not Leave Their Brethren Behind

Ad: This forum contains affiliate links to products on Amazon and eBay. More information in Terms and rules

Matt308

Glock Perfection
18,961
91
Apr 12, 2005
Washington State
Sky News: World News, Global News and International breaking News.

'A Leap Into The Unkown'
Updated: 09:17, Wednesday January 17, 2007

Royal Marines have carried out one of the most daring rescue missions ever staged to retrieve the body of a fallen comrade in Afghanistan.

It followed a ferocious battle in which 200 British troops backed by artillery, helicopters and aircraft raided a fort believed to be a major headquarters for Taliban militants.

Officials say that as the troops advanced they were engaged from several insurgent positions.

On retreat they discovered one Marine was missing and four men volunteered to go on a daring rescue mission.

Apache attack helicopters were used to mount the raid.

They have no room for passengers inside, so incredibly the Marines strapped themselves to the aircrafts' small side wings.

They then flew into the battle zone to locate Lance corporal Mathew Ford, the pilots also leaving the helicopters to give covering fire.

L Cpl Ford had died in the original attack but his body was recovered.

UK Task Force spokesman Lieutenant Colonel Rory Bruce, speaking on Sky News, said the heroic action was a "leap into the unknown".

"This is believed to be the first time UK forces have ever tried this type of rescue mission," he said.

"It was an extraordinary tale of heroism and bravery of our airmen, soldiers and marines who were all prepared to put themselves back into the line of fire to rescue a fallen comrade."

:salute:
 

Attachments

  • 200711743857_apache%20with%20passengers.jpg
    200711743857_apache%20with%20passengers.jpg
    7.3 KB · Views: 163
We actually got to go out and do that one time with the CAV squad. They have special points that you can be attached to for extractions.

While I was in Iraq there were 2 Apaches flying a mission. One got shot down, the other Apache landed and picked up the crew. The one that was hurt the most they put in the front seat of the Apache and the other 2 were strapped to the sides of the Apache and they flew to the nearest base.

Was pretty amazing.
 
We actually got to go out and do that one time with the CAV squad. They have special points that you can be attached to for extractions.

While I was in Iraq there were 2 Apaches flying a mission. One got shot down, the other Apache landed and picked up the crew. The one that was hurt the most they put in the front seat of the Apache and the other 2 were strapped to the sides of the Apache and they flew to the nearest base.

Was pretty amazing.

Would never have guessed attachment points on an Apache. Where are they located? Do you need a special harness? Is that normally carried by the Apache or special gear?
 
I dont know if they are carried by the crew or not. I never actually got carried, as I had Staff Duty that day, but my unit and friends did it. I will have to ask them to get more info for you on the subject.
 
They had a demo of a marine strapping onto a Apache on the news.

I am no expert when it comes to helicopters, but he crouched on the ledge by the canopy looped his arm round a handrail and clipped a strap to the handrail (Looked very primitive but effective). Apart from the harness I couldn't see any modifications to the Apache.

Appreciate if some one would tell me the overall situation in Afghanistan? As the news here is crap. From my ill informed point of view it would appear we are over commited and ill supplied with are polticians cocking it up.

Anyone heard of Blairs failed incentive of promising cash if the Afghans destroyed their poppy fields?
 
I am no expert when it comes to helicopters, but he crouched on the ledge by the canopy looped his arm round a handrail and clipped a strap to the handrail (Looked very primitive but effective). Apart from the harness I couldn't see any modifications to the Apache.

There are no modifactions to it. It is just a matter of being clipped of strapped in. I used to be a Blackhawk crewmember and the other BN in our unit was an Apache Unit. We would train with them quite often and had the oppurtunity to go out and get strapped in. My Flight Company went but I had staff duty that day so I did not get to go and fly on the outside of an Apache.

I will call my friend tomorrow though who did go and see what he has to say about how it actually went down.

bigZ said:
Appreciate if some one would tell me the overall situation in Afghanistan? As the news here is crap. From my ill informed point of view it would appear we are over commited and ill supplied with are polticians cocking it up.

I could help you out with Iraq only because I spent over a year there but Afghanistan I only know what comes on the news.
 
it's just, well, dogey as hell :lol: saying we're not sure about something over hear means, in this context, we think it's dogey... British saying only i guess........
 
Royal Marines not leaving a fallen comrade behind. Why are you amazed at this. Tradition in the services in the Commonwealth dictates you never leave a mate behind. Its tradition in the Royal Navy Royal Australian and New Zealand Navies etc. Its tradition in the Army or Air Force and its an old Tradition in the Royal Marines. NEVER LEAVE A MATE BEHIND. Lanc Gallipoli Crete Greece Dunkirk and Dieppe remember those now Afghanistan
 
The "never leave a comrade behind" is not the amazing part. It was the effort and means by which they did it. Clipping yourself to the outside of an AH-64 and flying into a hot zone is somewhat beyond the ordinary don't you think?
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Back