What is your favorite Science Fiction/Fantasy author?

Discussion in 'Fiction' started by freebird, Mar 4, 2008.

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Who is your favorite Science Fiction/Fantasy author?

  1. H.G. Wells

    22.5%
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien

    35.0%
  3. Ray Bradbury

    7.5%
  4. Jules Verne

    17.5%
  5. Edgar Rice Burroughs

    2.5%
  6. Robert Heinlein

    12.5%
  7. Robert Howard

    5.0%
  8. C.S. Lewis

    7.5%
  9. Isaac Asimov

    17.5%
  10. Arthur C. Clarke

    15.0%
  11. H.P. Lovecraft

    7.5%
  12. Roger Zelazny

    7.5%
  13. Michael Moorcock

    7.5%
  14. Larry Niven

    12.5%
  15. Frederick Pohl

    2.5%
  16. Ursula Le Guin

    5.0%
  17. George Orwell

    7.5%
  18. Poul Anderson

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  19. L. Ron Hubbard

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  20. Douglas Adams

    10.0%
  21. Fred Saberhagen

    2.5%
  22. Piers Anthony

    2.5%
  23. Frank Herbert

    2.5%
  24. Gene Roddenberry

    2.5%
  25. other {specify}

    30.0%
  1. freebird

    freebird Active Member

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    Speaking of Gary Gygax SF authors, I was wondering what people's favorite SF/Fantasy authors are?

    Multiple Choice Poll - choose more than 1 if you want.

     
  2. magnocain

    magnocain Member

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    Robert Jordan

    Too bad he died before he could finish his 12 book series!
     
  3. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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    THX Freebird! :) Mine, of course, is Ray Bradbury. Best description is he paints with words.

    For fantasy (if its such) is the master before all the hype - John Ronald Ruel Tolkien.
     
  4. freebird

    freebird Active Member

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    Sorry it took me some time to do all the poll options Njaco. I listed 24 authors, many more that were left out...
     
  5. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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    No need for apologises Freebird. After all this time here it never occured to me anyone else would like SF. I tend to the older type of writers - Tolkien, Lovecraft, Welles.

    Ought to add Lord Dunsany to that list. Talk about ahead of his time. He influenced Lovecraft and if you read him you can see why.
     
  6. HoHun

    HoHun Active Member

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    Hi Freebird,

    >Speaking of Gary Gygax SF authors, I was wondering what people's favorite SF/Fantasy authors are?

    Science Fiction I'd have to think long and hard ... Fantasy is spontaneous: George RR Martin.

    George R. R. Martin's Official Website

    Regards,

    Henning (HoHun)
     
  7. Marcel

    Marcel Well-Known Member

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    Fantasie: Robin Hobb. She writes books that I never can put down, but I'm also a Tolkien fan.
    I don't read that much SF, but I like Arthur C Clarke and I'm a fan of Startrek, so Roddenberry is also a favorite
     
  8. Konigstiger205

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    I gotta go with Jules Verne, that man probably foresaw the future with its books.I read them all and I read them again and again if they where mine.
     
  9. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

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    J.R.R Tolkien, and Terry Pratchett. Colin Wilson also wrote a good book called 'The space Vampires' - title sounds corny, but it's an interesting read into human nature.
     
  10. Heinz

    Heinz Active Member

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    Im currently doing a journalism course, non fiction is my thing. However I am enjoying George Orwell and also Matthew Reiley.
     
  11. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    Riiiiight....as Tolkien is the only one that I've heard about, what kinda sience fiction/fantasy do the others write??
     
  12. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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    I've always had a tendancy to serperate alot of the Authors. To me, Bradbury, Asimov, Verne and Welles were sci-fi. Tolkien, CS Lewis and those with dragons and such are Fantasy and Lovercraft and Dunsany are horror (though Lovecraft did have a great sci-fi story "In the Walls of Eryx" - how do you get out of a maze when the walls are transparent and moving?)

    Of course, this is just IMHO.
     
  13. Parmigiano

    Parmigiano Member

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    Don't have a number one, but Verne, Orwell, Asimov, Lovecraft and Douglas Adams above the others
     
  14. HoHun

    HoHun Active Member

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    Hi Lucky,

    >Riiiiight....as Tolkien is the only one that I've heard about, what kinda sience fiction/fantasy do the others write??

    H.G. Wells - Genre-defining Science Fiction like "The Time Machine".
    J.R.R. Tolkien - Linguistically sophisticated adoption of ancient myths into a greater whole.
    Ray Bradbury - Poetic rather than technology-driven Sci Fi.
    Jules Verne - Genre-defining stories on realistic future technology.
    Edgar Rice Burroughs - You might have heard of one character he invented ... "Tarzan"
    Robert Heinlein - "Starship Troopers" ... more a political manifest than a science fiction novel
    Robert Howard - "Conan the Barbarian"
    C.S. Lewis - "Chronicles of Narnia" ... slightly strange but very atmospheric
    Isaac Asimov - strictly scientific Sci Fi, robot stories, invented stricly logical laws of robotics and outlined the consequences of these laws to human society
    Arthur C. Clarke - WW2 radar nerd, scientifc Sci Fi, pointed out the usefulness of the geostationary orbit for communciation satellites.
    H.P. Lovecraft - old stuff, the attack of ancient and unconceivable forces on normal life
    Roger Zelazny - very rich and brilliantly written adventure/escapism fantasy
    Michael Moorcock - grim stuff, his "Elric of Melnibone" is sort of Conan backwards. He deliberately broke the mold of the old "sword and sorcery" stuff.
    Larry Niven - a master of technological visions that often make his stories pale in comparison. Often works with co-authors (unfortunately?)
    Frederick Pohl - I only know him as one of Niven's co-authors.
    Ursula Le Guin - I've only read a few short stories, but they were sort of a thoughful Fantasy/Sci Fi mix I like quite well.
    George Orwell - "1984" ... a great description of totalitarism and the capability of humans to deceive themselves despite seeing through their own deception
    Poul Anderson - Good old-fashioned Fantasy/Sci-Fi mix. I don't remember anything specifically, but most of it was quite good.
    L. Ron Hubbard - Founder of scientology. Supposedly his books echo their ideology.
    Douglas Adams - "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy". Brilliant, funny re-definition of Science Fiction in the 1980s.
    Fred Saberhagen - Hm, must have missed this guy.
    Piers Anthony - Best known for his "Xanth" Fantasy series which features a lot of unique characters and interesting stories despite not being too serious and actually relying on puns as one of the major story devices. Good stuff.
    Frank Herbert - "Dune" series. Great scenery, thousands of pages, little action.
    Gene Roddenberry - I didn't know he wrote books, too.

    Regards,

    Henning (HoHun)
     
  15. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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    Great synopsis Hohun!
     
  16. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    Cheers mate!
     
  17. freebird

    freebird Active Member

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    What kind of story is it? Who would you compare it to?

    True enough, but sometimes there are "crossover" authors. I particularly like Zelazny Moorcock. Moorcock is most famous for his "Elric" saga, which is Fantasy, except that some of the charachters are rather "dark", not easy "black white" like in Tolkien. He also wrote a rather {shocking} story about a researcher who goes back in time to find out what Jesus was like.... Totally unexpected. {condemned by the church of course!!} If you have heard the "Blue Oyster Cult" songs "Black Blade" or "Vetran of the Psychic Wars" they were both written about Moorcock's characters. {Black Blade is about the Demon Sword "Stormbringer"}

    Often this type of fiction explores "alternate realities" which is why there is some fantasy element


    I particularly like Larry Niven's "Ringworld" series, an facinating idea about an advanced race that "terraformed" their planet if you will, instead of a sphere, it is a thin "ring" that rotates around the sun at the same orbital distance as the planet did. {obviously using some pretty advanced compounds engineering!} The total mass would be the same as the planet, but the available usable surface area would be something like 1,000,000 times larger!

    Has anyone else besides Comiso read Larry Niven? One of the few authors that can write books that I cannot put down until I've finished it!
     

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  18. HoHun

    HoHun Active Member

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    Hi Freebird,

    >Has anyone else besides Comiso read Larry Niven? One of the few authors that can write books that I cannot put down until I've finished it!

    Sure :) I like the Ringworld universe best, too.

    Who was is who said "In Science Fiction, you are allowed to make one major deviation from reality at the beginning of the story, then everything else has to follow logically"?

    Poul Anderson perhaps? Anyway, Larry Niven is great at that stuff, drawing a mind-boggling scenery that is completely consistent and logical in itself.

    Regards,

    Henning (HoHun)
     
  19. Cota1992

    Cota1992 Member

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    Wow, I am surprised no one has mentioned David Drake. Not only is he my favorite SF writer but also his Hammers Slammers stories to me are also some the best military themed fiction I have read anywhere. I read David Drake even when I go through my total nonfiction stages.

    David Drake

    Art in DC
     
  20. freebird

    freebird Active Member

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    Lucky you probably know the movies, I think at least half of these authors have had movies made from their books.
     

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