WW1 Bombers.

jrk

Airman 1st Class
264
1
Jul 26, 2005
staffordshire
i think the dh4 was the best bomber of ww1.quick enough to get to the target and depending on crew able to fight its way out of trouble.also the fastest bomber of ww1.
 

Sour_kraut

Recruit
1
0
Jul 26, 2005
Devonshire
correct me if I'm wrong,but i beleive the dh.4 was the RFC bomber with the engine in the back and the gunner in the nose...It may have been fast but the german fighters were faster,and i know (from experience on flight simulators) that a quick burst in the rear where the engine is can put that machine out of order.
 

Glider

Captain
8,091
2,980
Apr 23, 2005
Lincolnshire
Sour. The DH4 was a traditional layout with the engine in front and the gunner at the back. With a top speed of 140 (with the Eagle engine) it was a lot faster than most fighters who normally had a top speed of 120. Not all I admit, but most
 

Smokey

Senior Airman
532
4
Dec 17, 2004
Eres a vid of a Zeppelin Staacken XIV

f041a.jpg


http://www.aeiou.at/aeiou.film.f/f041a <----Clicky

zest_r.jpg

Zeppelin Staacken
http://aircraft.lintec.ru/src/mod/zest_r.htm

linke00.jpg

Linke-Hoffman R.I
http://www.raravia.com/lhri.htm


vol01_4.jpg

Linke-Hoffman R.II
http://www.overthefront.com/issues/01_4.html

The Riesenflugzeug (Giant aircraft) Linke-Hoffman R.II 55/17 seen under construction at the Linke- Hoffman Werke in Breslau. This aircraft is purportedly the largest single airscrewed aircraft ever built. (The wheels were 5ft. in diameter!) Four 260 h.p. Mercedes D.IVa engines were mounted in the nose section of the fuselage in tandem, and drove a massive propeller at 545 rpm. The design philosopy was based on the successful C type aircraft design and enlarged upon. The aircraft was finished after the Armistice but flew and fulfilled it's design expectations. (photo via the W.R. Puglisi collection.)

Nice site about alleged paper projects and actual aircraft
http://www.bravenewworld.demon.co.uk/lists/germangiants/

image3.jpg

Siemens-Schuckert R VIII

This six-engined giant was intended to carry a wire-guided missile. It's a pity that it so narrowly missed its chance to get into the air. It had undertaken a series of taxiing trials, SSW R VIIIand was preparing for its first flight when a propeller came apart, causing great damage on the left hand side. This was now 1919 and despite thoughts of conversion into a civil transport, it wasn't repaired and the second machine was never finished. With a wingspan of 48m/157ft it was the largest aeroplane built by anyone during the war, and the biggest biplane ever built. What's more, I've seen a current Siemens booklet, Milestones, which asserts that the R VIII did indeed fly. Doubtful, but I'd love to believe it.


http://boards.historychannel.com/thread.jspa?forumID=88&threadID=300026369

The raid on London on January 28, 1918, was carried out by three Gothas and one Giant. The Gotha twin-motor pusher biplane is well known, but the 'Giant', built by various firms, including Zeppelin and Siemens, was almost twice as big as the Gotha and could carry a bomb load six times larger over a much greater range. Depending on the manufacturer, it had anywhere from three to six motors. It was the Giant that caused the damage.
On the January 28th raid the Giant carried 1200 kg of bombs, two of them of the 300 kg type. One of these was dropped, not upon, but next to Messrs. Odhams Printing Works in Long Acre. The resulting explosion was thus directed at the basement, which, since the building had 9" concrete floors, had been used as a shelter. An outbreak of fire caused the death of those imprisoned in the debris.
On the return trip, the Giant ran into barrage balloon cables and actually carried away two of them but managed to land safely.

The aircraft was a Staaken R.VI, serial R.39, commanded by Hptm. von Bentivegni.

DSC09085.jpg

Caproni Ca.36 Bomber
 

Smokey

Senior Airman
532
4
Dec 17, 2004
Insane WW1 story

leach27a.jpg


http://leachintl.com/heritage/heritage-6-2000.html

KAZAKOV AND HIS KATZE

The startled Germans couldn’t believe their eyes. Behind them, trailing a five-pronged anchor and an iron ball, was a Russian pilot in a Morone scout. Before they could get away, the Russian struck from above and behind, swinging the anchor on its steel cable. As he turned, it hooked into the left wing of their two-seater Albatros DVa. For a moment, the two planes were locked in combat, then the cable tore loose and the iron ball completely shattered the wing. The Albatros collapsed and fell.

Staff-Captain Alexander A. Kazalov, using a weapon unique in the history of aerial fighting, had scored another victory on the Russian front. It was June 1915.

The anchor of “katze” was part of an experiment that had interested Kazakov during his days at the Sevastopol Flying School, founded by the Grand Duke Alexander to train pilots for the Imperial Russian Air Service. To the katze, an old form of German battering ram, Kazakov added a medium-sized iron ball weighing about 20 pounds, which acted like a sinker above a fishhook. It was Kazakov’s last experiment with an untried weapon, but it was not his last aerial adventure. Before his career ended, Kazakov had scored 32 kills. He held every known Russian decoration for gallantry, received the French Croix de Guerre and served as a major in the British army, which awarded him the Distinguished Service Order.

The plane Kazakov used in his katze attack was a French-built Morone-Souinier scout, a wire-braced, mid-wing monoplane that first saw military service in 1914, principally with the French and British. It was powered by an 80-hp Le Rohne engine to a maximum speed of only 78 mph. Fitted with a 110-hp Le Rhone in 1916, the Morone reached a top speed of 102 mph.

The best known of Russian World War I aces, Kazakov was quiet and modest – a born pilot gifted with a combination of daring and discipline. He was a cavalry officer when Germany declared war on Russia in August 1914, but quickly transferred to the air service.

In the spring of 1916, Kazakov was named to command Russia’s 19th squadron, the famed “death of glory” squadron formed on the Central Front. The 19th, used as a shock unit, preceded von Richthofen’s “Flying Circus” by nearly a year.

With revolution rife in his country and an armistice signed between the Central Powers and Bolshevik Russia, Kazakov and several Russian war pilots joined the Slave-British aviation group in 1917 to fight against the Bolos.

When the Allied forces withdrew from Murmansk in the summer of 1919, Kazakov turned down a post in London to remain with his squadron. He and two comrades decided to join the White Russian army in Siberia, and, on August 1 took off from Bereznik Aerodrome. His Sopwith Camel collapsed in mid-air, and Russia’s leading ace was killed instantly.
 

plan_D

Lieutenant Colonel
11,643
20
Apr 1, 2004
I know, I've always thought the trailing bombers of a formation could trail steel cable out the back to cover the formation. Obviously they would be able to winch the cable in and out, it'd have been a great idea. Seeing all the interceptors getting tangled up and then blasted by the gunners.
 

Smokey

Senior Airman
532
4
Dec 17, 2004
Steel cables were no guarantee against the large planes of WW1......

http://boards.historychannel.com/thread.jspa?forumID=88&threadID=300026369

The raid on London on January 28, 1918, was carried out by three Gothas and one Giant. The Gotha twin-motor pusher biplane is well known, but the 'Giant', built by various firms, including Zeppelin and Siemens, was almost twice as big as the Gotha and could carry a bomb load six times larger over a much greater range. Depending on the manufacturer, it had anywhere from three to six motors. It was the Giant that caused the damage.
On the January 28th raid the Giant carried 1200 kg of bombs, two of them of the 300 kg type. One of these was dropped, not upon, but next to Messrs. Odhams Printing Works in Long Acre. The resulting explosion was thus directed at the basement, which, since the building had 9" concrete floors, had been used as a shelter. An outbreak of fire caused the death of those imprisoned in the debris.
On the return trip, the Giant ran into barrage balloon cables and actually carried away two of them but managed to land safely.

The aircraft was a Staaken R.VI, serial R.39, commanded by Hptm. von Bentivegni.

RD0055.jpg

Zeppelin Staaken R.VI

http://www.squadron.com/ItemDetails.asp?item=rd0055

http://www.darkmatterinc.tv/rmipms/ZepplinRVI.htm
 

cheddar cheese

Major General
20,265
18
Jan 9, 2004
WSM, England
FLYBOYJ said:
JCS said:
Sour_kraut said:
and i know (from experience on flight simulators)

:lol: I always find that funny when somebody says something like that....

I'm a flight instructor - how do you think I feel when I hear a student say that! :lol: :eeeeek: #-o

At ATC we get taught how to fly on FS2002...I suppose its useful for navigation techniques before they let us up in a real plane.
 

FLYBOYJ

"THE GREAT GAZOO"
Staff
Mod
27,892
8,387
Apr 9, 2005
Colorado, USA
cheddar cheese said:
FLYBOYJ said:
JCS said:
Sour_kraut said:
and i know (from experience on flight simulators)

:lol: I always find that funny when somebody says something like that....

I'm a flight instructor - how do you think I feel when I hear a student say that! :lol: :eeeeek: #-o

At ATC we get taught how to fly on FS2002...I suppose its useful for navigation techniques before they let us up in a real plane.

I have FS 2002 - I used it for intrument training - very good tool. Its good for navigation, instrument work and "flying by the numbers." After that that's it! I have found that students who think they know how to fly based on PC SIM experience flair high when landing, get spooked when doing stalls, and have a hard time doing steep bank turns (30 degree bank angle) because they have forces acting on their bodies while in flight.

CC - What's ATC?
 

cheddar cheese

Major General
20,265
18
Jan 9, 2004
WSM, England
Air Training Corps, actually ;)

Yeah I think so...Yeah we get flight training, then they let us up to fly in a Grob Tutor. When im 16, I can train to get my Glider wings! 8)
 

FLYBOYJ

"THE GREAT GAZOO"
Staff
Mod
27,892
8,387
Apr 9, 2005
Colorado, USA
cheddar cheese said:
Air Training Corps, actually ;)

Yeah I think so...Yeah we get flight training, then they let us up to fly in a Grob Tutor. When im 16, I can train to get my Glider wings! 8)

THAT'S GREAT CC! The Tutor is a fun little airplane. Learing to fly a sailplane makes you really proficent in other aircraft. Are you hoping to eventually enter the military?
 

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