A King Kong Fled

Discussion in 'OFF-Topic / Misc.' started by Shinpachi, Apr 15, 2016.

  1. Shinpachi

    Shinpachi Well-Known Member

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    A male chimpanzee, Chacha 24, wanted to enjoy the gorgeous cherry blossoms outside his zoo. He jumped over the 4 meters wide moat and 2 meters high wall. He was successful but -



    He is fine with his family in the zoo now.
     
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  2. Marcel

    Marcel Well-Known Member

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    And he didn't hold a pretty lady in his hand this time :)

    That was a risky manoeuvre catching him. First they fled just in time for his anger and then they just not quite missed him when he fell.

    Glad no harm was done.
     
  3. Shinpachi

    Shinpachi Well-Known Member

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    Earthquake is not unusual but this was :)
     
  4. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

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    Glad all worked out well...
     
  5. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

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    Awesome little guy, glad he is ok.
     
  6. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    Glad he is back safe, now!

    Speaking of safe, I hope you and your family remains safe during these terrible aftershocks, Shinpachi!
     
  7. Gnomey

    Gnomey World Travelling Doctor
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    Seems like he enjoyed his little adventure. Glad he was returned safely.
     
  8. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

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    Yea I'm with Dave, I hope everybody is safe and sound.
     
  9. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Turned out well in the end, and he's a handsome specimen. Thanks for posting.
    Just been reading about the earthquakes on the BBC Internet News - hope you and your family are safe.
     
  10. Shinpachi

    Shinpachi Well-Known Member

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    #10 Shinpachi, Apr 16, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2016
    Thank you very much for your kind comments everyone ! :)

    As we Japanese live on the volcano islands, we understand the earthquake is unavoidable natural phenomenon and the disaster is avoidable human error. Our government's reaction for the rescue mission this time is surprisingly quick and effective. They seem learned a lot from the Fukushima Dai-ichi in 2011.
     
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  11. bobbysocks

    bobbysocks Well-Known Member

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    he sure wasn't too pleased with getting shot with that dart. good thing those men were just far enough away...a little closer and the monkey might have shown his displeasure. also, lucky for him the wires were insulated. had he been on the pole in front of my house and grabbed two wires...he would be an ex-monkey.
     
  12. mikewint

    mikewint Well-Known Member

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    Actually the wires need not be insulated. Current can only flow into a ground so unless and until the he touches something connected to the ground- no current. That's why birdies can perch on the wires and not get fried. Your house breaker box is grounded to a 4ft long copper rod driven into the earth. The center connector bar is connected to that copper rod.
     
  13. Shinpachi

    Shinpachi Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for your kind comments, bobby and mike :thumbright:

    The zoo is located in the mountain area of Tohoku and there are still many wild bears.
    They are happy to climb the poles to get the electric shock.

    Tohoku_Electric_Power_Co.JPG
     
  14. bobbysocks

    bobbysocks Well-Known Member

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    yes i understand that....but birds always stay on the same wire. they never straddle 2 or more. the opposite polarity is also strung on that pole. at several points in his adventure he holds and/or stands on 2 or more wires...and i am sure that is not just a 110v...but higher voltage and high amperage. you grab both the hot and negative wires life cold get interesting. we used to cook hot dogs that way....no ground just the black wire and the white wire...

    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lo_jLssjOYE
     
  15. Marcel

    Marcel Well-Known Member

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    Birds also have a small body, which can not hold much voltage. A human or an ape has a larger body, being able to hold much more voltage. This means that the body could discharge through the air to the ground, killing it instandly.

    Glad you are okay Simpachi. Stay safe.
     
  16. Shinpachi

    Shinpachi Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Marcel for your kind care !

    The voltage on the pole in the residence area is said 6,600V which is transformed to 100V (or 200V if requested) for the home use.
     
  17. mikewint

    mikewint Well-Known Member

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    Time to define terms. VOLTAGE is the FORCE pushing the electrons through the wire. AMPERAGE is the AMOUNT of electrical current in the wire. Think of a water pipe. You apply pressure to push the water through the pipe. As a result a volume of water flows through the pipe. Force is required to push the water because of friction between the water and pipe walls. In a similar manner friction prevents electrons from freely flowing through a conductor thus they, like the water, have to be pushed. Electrical resistance is measured in OHMS. Conductors, like copper, steel, aluminum, etc. have very low amounts of friction to electron movement while non-conductors (a misnomer, actually insulators) offer a very high amount of friction to electron movement. Dry air, e.g., is an excellent insulator requiring 76,200 volts to ionize the air enough to carry a 1 inch (2.54cm) spark.
    The standard utility pole in the United States is about 40 ft (12 m) long and is buried about 6 ft (2 m) in the ground.
    So a “body” be it bird or bear cannot hold/contain voltage and discharging through the air to the ground impossible (unless you have 31,000,000 volts)
    Ok so far so good, now the wires on the poles. Once again let’s define terms:
    Distribution lines carry power from local substations to customers. They generally carry voltages from 4.6 to 33 kilovolts (kV) for distances up to thirty miles, and include transformers to step the voltage down from the primary voltage of the lines to the lower secondary voltage used by the customer. A service drop carries this lower voltage to the customer's premises.
    Subtransmission lines carry higher voltage power from regional substations to local substations. They usually carry 46 kV, 69 kV, or 115 kV for distances up to 60 miles.
    On poles carrying both, the electric power distribution lines and associated equipment are mounted at the top of the pole above the communication cables, for safety. The wires themselves are uninsulated, and are supported by insulators, usually porcelain,(although wood is a non-conductor WET wood can conduct thus the insulators), commonly mounted on a horizontal crossarm. Power is transmitted using the three-phase system, with three wires, or phases, labeled "A", "B", and "C".
    At the power station, an electrical generator converts mechanical power into a set of three AC electric currents, one from each coil (or winding) of the generator. The windings are arranged such that the currents vary sinusoidally at the same frequency but with the peaks and troughs of their wave forms offset to provide three complementary currents with a phase separation of one-third cycle (120°). The generator frequency is typically 50 or 60 Hz, varying by country.
    At the power station, transformers change the voltage from generators to a level suitable for transmission.
    After further voltage conversions in the transmission network, the voltage is finally transformed to the standard utilization before power is supplied to customers.
    Most automotive alternators generate three phase AC and rectify it to DC with a diode bridge.
    Now, Subtransmission lines comprise only these 3 wires, plus sometimes an overhead ground wire (OGW), also called a "static line" or a "neutral", suspended above them. The OGW acts like a lightning rod, providing a low resistance path to ground, thus protecting the phase conductors from atmospheric static discharges.
    The pole itself may also be grounded with a heavy bare copper or copper-clad steel wire running down the pole, attached to the metal pin supporting each insulator, and at the bottom connected to a metal rod driven into the ground. Some countries ground every pole while others only ground every fifth pole and any pole with a transformer on it. This provides a path for leakage currents across the surface of the insulators to get to ground, preventing the current from flowing through the wooden pole which could cause a fire or shock hazard. It provides similar protection in case of flashovers and lightning strikes.

    OK, at last anything, bird, chimp, or bear touching any of these transmission lines is totally safe UNLESS a ground wire is also touched at the same time. If our poor bear touched the subtansmission line PLUS the OGW above it or any other wire plus the poles grounding wire at the same time, he’s gonna fry.
     
  18. mikewint

    mikewint Well-Known Member

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    Time to define terms. VOLTAGE is the FORCE pushing the electrons through the wire. AMPERAGE is the AMOUNT of electrical current in the wire. Think of a water pipe. You apply pressure to push the water through the pipe. As a result a volume of water flows through the pipe. Force is required to push the water because of friction between the water and pipe walls. In a similar manner friction prevents electrons from freely flowing through a conductor thus they, like the water, have to be pushed. Electrical resistance is measured in OHMS. Conductors, like copper, steel, aluminum, etc. have very low amounts of friction to electron movement while non-conductors (a misnomer, actually insulators) offer a very high amount of friction to electron movement. Dry air, e.g., is an excellent insulator requiring 76,200 volts to ionize the air enough to carry a 1 inch (2.54cm) spark.
    The standard utility pole in the United States is about 40 ft (12 m) long and is buried about 6 ft (2 m) in the ground.
    So a “body” be it bird or bear cannot hold/contain voltage and discharging through the air to the ground impossible (unless you have 31,000,000 volts)
    Ok so far so good, now the wires on the poles. Once again let’s define terms:
    Distribution lines carry power from local substations to customers. They generally carry voltages from 4.6 to 33 kilovolts (kV) for distances up to thirty miles, and include transformers to step the voltage down from the primary voltage of the lines to the lower secondary voltage used by the customer. A service drop carries this lower voltage to the customer's premises.
    Subtransmission lines carry higher voltage power from regional substations to local substations. They usually carry 46 kV, 69 kV, or 115 kV for distances up to 60 miles.
    On poles carrying both, the electric power distribution lines and associated equipment are mounted at the top of the pole above the communication cables, for safety. The wires themselves are uninsulated, and are supported by insulators, usually porcelain,(although wood is a non-conductor WET wood can conduct thus the insulators), commonly mounted on a horizontal crossarm. Power is transmitted using the three-phase system, with three wires, or phases, labeled "A", "B", and "C".
    At the power station, an electrical generator converts mechanical power into a set of three AC electric currents, one from each coil (or winding) of the generator. The windings are arranged such that the currents vary sinusoidally at the same frequency but with the peaks and troughs of their wave forms offset to provide three complementary currents with a phase separation of one-third cycle (120°). The generator frequency is typically 50 or 60 Hz, varying by country.
    At the power station, transformers change the voltage from generators to a level suitable for transmission.
    After further voltage conversions in the transmission network, the voltage is finally transformed to the standard utilization before power is supplied to customers.
    Most automotive alternators generate three phase AC and rectify it to DC with a diode bridge.
    Now, Subtransmission lines comprise only these 3 wires, plus sometimes an overhead ground wire (OGW), also called a "static line" or a "neutral", suspended above them. The OGW acts like a lightning rod, providing a low resistance path to ground, thus protecting the phase conductors from atmospheric static discharges.
    The pole itself may also be grounded with a heavy bare copper or copper-clad steel wire running down the pole, attached to the metal pin supporting each insulator, and at the bottom connected to a metal rod driven into the ground. Some countries ground every pole while others only ground every fifth pole and any pole with a transformer on it. This provides a path for leakage currents across the surface of the insulators to get to ground, preventing the current from flowing through the wooden pole which could cause a fire or shock hazard. It provides similar protection in case of flashovers and lightning strikes.

    OK, at last anything, bird, chimp, or bear touching any of these transmission lines is totally safe UNLESS a ground wire is also touched at the same time. If our poor bear touched the subtansmission line PLUS the OGW above it or any other wire plus the poles grounding wire at the same time, he’s gonna fry.
    548px-3_phase_AC_waveform.svg.png
     
  19. Marcel

    Marcel Well-Known Member

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    #19 Marcel, Apr 18, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2016
    Nice physics lesson Mike, but:
    There is always moisture in there air ( except in the Sahara) making an aerial discharge much more likely when a big body like the bear's is charged like a battery by the line. Another problem might be that if the current in the wire is of the changing type (don't know the English word, sorry) then the body will keep on charging and discharging all the time which is not a problem in a small body like a bird, but in a bear or an ape, will make a current that might be too high to survive.
     
  20. mikewint

    mikewint Well-Known Member

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    #20 mikewint, Apr 18, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2016
    Transmitted electrical energy is via AC or Alternating Current in French Courant Alternatif. Think in terms of PUSH and then PULL. Electrons in the wire are first pushed forward and then pulled backwards creating an oscillation in the position of the electrons over time. This has several advantages from an engineering standpont. Since the electrons move only very slightly friction (resistance) is reduced. Going back to the water pipe, the fluid analogy would be a pump that consists of a piston moving left and right which creates an oscillation in the movement of water molecules. In a copper wire the velocity of electrons is about 300 microns/second. In a half cycle at 60 Hz this translates to just 2.5 microns. So one can say the electrons vibrate about a mean position about 2.5 microns in 60Hz AC circuits.
    Like all energy, electricity seeks equilibrium, or balance. That means electricity will flow from high-energy areas to areas of less energy, always using the path of least resistance. So if the bird has one foot on our original wire, and the other foot on, for example, the ground or on a different wire with less voltage, the bird would be electrocuted. The electricity would pass through the bird on its way from the high-voltage line to the lower-voltage line or the ground.
    But as long as both of the bird’s feet are on the same wire (or wires of the same voltage), the bird is safe. The current doesn’t have anywhere else to go, so the electricity won’t pass through the bird–it stays on the path of least resistance, the wire. So electrons (current) NEVER enters the bird’s/chimp’s/bear’s body.
    Now, in wires, electrical energy is transmitted through the movement of electrons BUT in air/birds/chimps/bears/humans free electrons are absent. Electrical energy is transmitted through the movement of IONS, i.e., atoms that have an electrical charge because they have lost/gained one or more electrons. Air, a mixture of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water are ALL covalently bonded molecules, i.e. NO free electrons. Breaking those molecular bonds and creating ions is a matter of force, i.e. enough voltage. Dry air has a resistivity of 1.3 X 10^16 (Ohm-m) and humid air 3.3 X 10^16 (Ohm-m). Humid air with a higher content of water molecules has more resistance than dry due to the increased number of water molecules that must be ionized.

    The lowest current required to kill a human is only 0.07 amps going through the chest or head. The electric chair that was once used for many electrocutions produces only 2000 volts. Given the resistance of 500,000 ohms for the average human, this would be only 0.004 amps! So how could the electric chair be lethal? The reason that it works is because they dip the electrodes used for electrocutions in salt-water, which is very conductive to electricity. A large part of the human body's resistance to electricity comes from the skin. When the skin is wet, it is much less resistive and the total resistance drops from 500,000 ohms to only about 5,000 ohms, meaning that the current is increased to 0.4 amps, which is more than enough to kill a person
    183_birdonwire.jpg
     
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