AT-6 Texan as "emergency fighter"

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by Jerry W. Loper, Jul 10, 2014.

  1. Jerry W. Loper

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2007
    Messages:
    123
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    The RAF had "emergency fighters" like the Miles M.20 in the wings, in case 1st line fighters like the Spitfire and Hurricane weren't enough. Could the USAAF have modified the North American AT-6 trainer into an "emergency fighter" by, say, increasing its speed by more than 100 mph by installing a new powerplant, making it a single-seater, and boosting its armament?
     
  2. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2005
    Messages:
    23,208
    Likes Received:
    791
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Aircraft Maintenance Manager/ Flight Instructor
    Location:
    Colorado, USA
  3. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2003
    Messages:
    5,906
    Likes Received:
    853
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Electrical Engineer, Aircraft Restoration
    Location:
    Rancho Cucamonga, California, U.S.A.
    When I was in Arizona, one of the fellows there converted a T-6 into a P-64, but I don't recall the wingroot going as far as faring into the engine cowling. So, the real P-64 shown in Joe's pic above must be shorter than the T-6 by about a cockpit length.

    Basically the conversion was to add the turtledeck and fare in the canopy, add the big engine and prop, and clip the wings.

    The real P-64 looks like a shorter airframe maybe with the wings moved forward a bit.
     
  4. Bernhart

    Bernhart <b>2012 Forum Fantasy Football Champion</ b>

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Occupation:
    mental health nurse
    Location:
    Canada
    I beleieve Belgium used them in the congo as ground attack aircraft
     
  5. Shortround6

    Shortround6 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2009
    Messages:
    9,780
    Likes Received:
    802
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    retired Firefighter
    Location:
    Central Florida Highlands
    #5 Shortround6, Jul 10, 2014
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2014
    Australians built the Boomerang Fighter

    boomerang_01.jpg

    Which may meet your criteria, speed just over 300mph.

    But the US had a lot more factories building fighters by 1941/42 which rather reduces the need for such things.
     
  6. Jerry W. Loper

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2007
    Messages:
    123
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Thanks, guys!

     
  7. Wildcat

    Wildcat Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Messages:
    8,857
    Likes Received:
    376
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Workin' for the man....
    Location:
    South East Queensland
    Being pedantic I know, but the Boomerang was derived from (but many differences) the Wirraway. The Wirraway was inturn developed from the NA-16, not the T-6 as many seem to think.
     
  8. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2003
    Messages:
    5,906
    Likes Received:
    853
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Electrical Engineer, Aircraft Restoration
    Location:
    Rancho Cucamonga, California, U.S.A.
    Take an NA-16, add retractible landing gear, larger engine prop, provision for armament, and a straight rudder outline and you have a T-6.

    You are technically correct, but the airframe is the SAME with the exceptions above. The main differences are the LG, engine and straight rudder outline. The engine is major, but you wouldn't notice it from a casual glance. The dead giveaway is the straight or curved rudder ... and whether or not the gear was up.
     
  9. evangilder

    evangilder "Shooter"
    Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2004
    Messages:
    19,419
    Likes Received:
    137
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    Network Engineer/Photographer
    Location:
    Moorpark, CA
    Home Page:
    The P-64 was developed from the NA-50, seen here.
    DSC_4717.jpg
     
  10. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2011
    Messages:
    3,743
    Likes Received:
    439
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Aircraft Engineer
    Location:
    Nelson
    They are similar, but different. The NA-16 also had a fabric covered fuselage and rounded wing tips, as did the Wirraway. The Wirraway and the NA-16-2K that went to Australia as the basis of the Wirraway also differed from the AT-6/Harvard in having a three bladed propeller.

    The NA-16 was equivalent to the US military's BT-9, with fixed undercarriage and fabric covered fuselage, the BT-14 or Yale to the Brits had the fixed gear but semi monocoque fuse and the BC-1 had fabric fuselage and retractable gear - this was the British Harvard Mk.I. The AT-6 obviously differed to these in having the monocoque fuse and retractable gear, whereas the Wirraway had the fabric covered fuse and retractable gear. Although derived from the NA-16, the Wirraway had more in common with the BC-1.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2003
    Messages:
    5,906
    Likes Received:
    853
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Electrical Engineer, Aircraft Restoration
    Location:
    Rancho Cucamonga, California, U.S.A.
    #11 GregP, Jul 11, 2014
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2014
    Hey EvanGilder,

    That's the guy's plane who was a jeweler who converted the T-6 into a P-64, Carl Smeeter, and that's the T-6 he converted.

    I was there. He borrowed a battery from my friend with a T-6 and tried to replace it with a dud. My good friend, Curtis Earl , never ever gave him another spare part. Carl died before 2009 (like 1993 - 4 or so), so I'm not sure who is in the cockpit in the picture. Carl's P-64 was identical at least. You can SEE it's longer and the wing doesn't get into the cowling area, so it is Carl's conversion ... or another T-6 so converted in the same manner and the same color.
     
  12. evangilder

    evangilder "Shooter"
    Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2004
    Messages:
    19,419
    Likes Received:
    137
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    Network Engineer/Photographer
    Location:
    Moorpark, CA
    Home Page:
    Yeah it's an NA-50 replica, buikt from a T-6. If I remember correctly, it was based in Arizona when I took that shot. It was a few years ago, and I didn't get a chance to talk to the guy about it.
     
  13. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2003
    Messages:
    5,906
    Likes Received:
    853
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Electrical Engineer, Aircraft Restoration
    Location:
    Rancho Cucamonga, California, U.S.A.
    Don't know which airport this pic is on, but the conversion was done at Deer Valley airport on the north side of the Phoenix metro area.
     
  14. wuzak

    wuzak Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2011
    Messages:
    4,185
    Likes Received:
    167
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Hobart Tasmania
    So, what is the pilot thinking?

    "They say if I survive the month they will order me a Spitfire!"
     
Loading...

Share This Page