Did any WWII pilots/units paint their aircraft red (or any other conspicuous color)?

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by gjs238, May 15, 2015.

  1. gjs238

    gjs238 Well-Known Member

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    Did any WWII pilots/units paint their aircraft red (or any other conspicuous color)?
     
  2. Greyman

    Greyman Active Member

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    The British painted some aircraft in a highly reflective red for radar tests.
     
  3. fubar57

    fubar57 Well-Known Member

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    Though I'm not sure if this aircraft saw combat, I believe he flew a few sorties in it...

    Untitled.jpg

    Geo
     
  4. cherry blossom

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  5. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

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    The 325th used the checkertail pattern throughout the war.

    The 348th FG painted the tail assembly white.
     
  6. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    If you mean all red like several WWI German air service aircraft, there were a few in WWII.

    There were some examples in the Red Airforce, YaK-3, La-7 and I believe a YaK-9. There was also a lend-lease Spitfire Mk.IX based out of Leningrad (27 Guards Air Defense), but that was just for the victory day celebration directly after the war...the others I mentioned were used in combat. The Red Airforce also had quite a few examples that employed large areas of red, like on the nose, wing surfaces and portions of the fuselage and tail.

    Another aircraft that used a great deal of red in it's paint scheme, was the Fw190D used by JV44 as airfield defense during the unit's Me262 landing and take-offs. The entire underside of the aircraft was painted red with white stripes running lengthwise. This was to help identify the aircraft to AA gunners to avoid friendly fire.
     
  7. fubar57

    fubar57 Well-Known Member

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    #7 fubar57, May 15, 2015
    Last edited: May 15, 2015
    I was referring to the over-all black. I've since read that it was painted after being taken off operations and was used to hassle high-altitude German reconnaissance aircraft and for flying from base to base.

    Geo
     
  8. Capt. Vick

    Capt. Vick Well-Known Member

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    It is rumored that Spate flew the first Me 163 intercept in an all red Komet, the ground crew likening him to the red baron. He was not amused. Also a Ta 152 was painted an all over orange IIRC for a delivery flight late in the war.
     
  9. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    One Ta 152 was painted overall red/orange for its return flight to Rechlin. Obslt. Fritz Auffhammer had been assessing the aircraft with the unit he commanded, JG 301, and was worried about the potential for 'friendly' fire from the notoriously light fingered German flak units on the return flight. The story has been cast into doubt from time to time but both Auffhammer and Hptm. Roderich Cescotti, who flew escort in his Fw 190 D-9, gave a signed statement to Jerry Crandall, in 2001, to confirm that the flight took place on 22nd March 1945. Neither were the sort of man who would have done such a thing lightly.
    Cheers
    Steve
     
  10. Glider

    Glider Well-Known Member

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    It obviously wasn't paint but a good chunk of the USAAF were all silver which is pretty conspicious
     
  11. Koopernic

    Koopernic Active Member

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    #11 Koopernic, May 16, 2015
    Last edited: May 16, 2015
    Squadrons assigned to protect Me 262 during their landing were painted in lurid red and other colours. They were called papagei (parrot) squadrons. The purpose of this was to clearly identify themselves to own FLAK. JG44 or Galland circus was the one. Mainly Fw 190D with the latest boost technology and fuel.
     
  12. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    There were also the PRU Spitfires that were painted pink overall
     
  13. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    Only the undersides and then red (RLM 23) with white stripes. The aircraft comprised JV 44's 'platzschutzstaffel' or airfield protection squadron (as also noted by Graugeist). One of them was a D-11.The idea for this sort of squadron had its origins in the works protection flights assigned to some factories and facilities. Many thought the stripes to be black and white until one, not very good, colour photograph emerged.

    Cheers

    Steve
     
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