Fatal Army Air Forces Aviation Accidents in the United States

Discussion in 'Basic' started by TonyM, May 18, 2008.

  1. TonyM

    TonyM New Member

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    I have been asked to post an excerpt from my three volume reference work titled:

    FATAL ARMY AIR FORCES AVIATION ACCIDENTS
    IN THE UNITED STATES 1941-1945


    The following summary, based on the official AAF Form No. 14 Aircraft Accident Report, appears in Volume II on page 447:

    7-24-43. Ephrata, Washington. At 0054 PWT, a Boeing B-17F collided with a hill 10 miles north of Ephrata Army Air Base, Ephrata, Washingon, killing thirteen fliers. The B-17F was returning from a bombing training mission and was circling the area in an attempt to enter the traffic pattern for the base when the accident occurred seven miles north of the pattern area. Investigation revealed that the airplane was in a left bank that exactly matched the the slope of a hill that the airplane was flying over. It is probable that the pilots could not see the surface because of darkness and were unaware of their proximity to the ground. The B-17 was configured for landing with flaps partially down and the landing gear extended. The B-17 contacted the surface of the hill in a left bank with the main wheels and rolled about 200 yards before striking a horse that weighed an estimated 1,500 pounds. The horse was severly slashed in two places by the number-two propeller, which was knocked off by the collision. The collision with the horse knocked off the port landing gear. As the B-17 bounded back into the air for about 100 feet, the port landing gear and the port main wheel hurtled backward into the port horizontal stabilizer and elevator, knocking them off. Other than the tracks made by the two main wheels, there was no other marks on the ground that appeared to be made by the wings or the tail wheel, indicating that the airplane had been rolling on the hill on both main wheels when it collided with the horse. After colliding with the horse and losing the port landing gear, the airplane continued across a gulley and collided with another hill, smashing up the side for aobut 400 yards, breaking up and bursting into flames. The main wreckage came to rest about one-half mile from the point of first contact with the terrain. Killed in the crash were: 2Lt. James P. Ticksman, pilot; 2Lt. John W. O'Chesky, co-pilot; 2Lt. Jay D. Underwood, co-pilot; 2Lt. Julian M. Crapp, co-pilot; F/O Owen E. Longest, bombardier; Sgt. George L. Dobson, engineer; Sgt. Bobby P. Cone, engineer; Sgt. Edwin Johnstone, engineer; Sgt. Arthur D. Grant, engineer; Sgt. Werner F. Haukop, engineer; Sgt. George O. Cartwright, radio operator; Sgt. Willim W. Aulwes, gunner; Sgt. Anneslely E. Hodson III, gunner.


    ABOUT THE WORK

    The work consists of three volumes and covers the time from 1 January 1941 to 31 December 1945. There are over 6,350 fatal AAF aircraft accident summaries based on official accident reports; the work includes the names of over 15,500 AAF airmen killed in AAF airplane accidents in the US during WWII; the work includes an index of over 7,100 AAF aircraft involved in fatal accidents in the US during WWII (including serial numbers); the work includes a listing of over 6,350 fatal AAF aircrash locations in the continental US during WWII. There are over 32,000 individual index entries; Includes Author notes, Bibliography and Statistics. The three-volume set was published by McFarland Co. Inc. Publishers, Jefferson, NC, in 2006. The work is still in print. See amazon for reviews. Noted aviation author and historian Nick Veronico: Tony's work "is an important addition to the historical record." Aviation News of the UK stated: "This is a superlative work for aviation enthusasts and historians and a staggering piece of research into previously unexplored avenues of aviation history."

    TonyM.


    Anthony J. Mireles
     
  2. wilbur1

    wilbur1 Active Member

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    Wow thats great! thanks for the post. I will try to find it and get it :D
     
  3. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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    Great stuff Tony. Maybe the Mods can put it in the Stories section where more members might see it.
     
  4. freebird

    freebird Active Member

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    :salute: Thats quite alot of fatalities....
     
  5. ccheese

    ccheese Member In Perpetuity
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    WoW.. sure is !

    Charles
     
  6. DOUGRD

    DOUGRD Member

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    I would suspect that the average civilian back in the 40's, as well as today, had no idea how many service personnel died in training accidents on a daily basis. Not to mention vehicle accidents, previously unknown medical conditions etc. These people too gave their lives in the service of their country but are unknown but to their own friends and families. What a shame.:salute:
     
  7. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for sharing Tony!
     
  8. freebird

    freebird Active Member

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    I guess that makes sense why they had so many training posters in the museum....
     

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  9. v2

    v2 Well-Known Member

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  10. TonyM

    TonyM New Member

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    Here are some more statistics concerning fatal AAF airplane crashes on the home front during WWII:

    Between June 1942 and June 1945, there were over 500 fatal B-24 accidents.

    Thirty-eight WASPs died in fatal aircraft accidents during the war

    There are at least 77 Army Air Forces airplanes and 331 AAF airmen and one female WASP pilot missing in the continental United States and its waters from the WWII years.

    There were 231 fatal AAF accidents during the month of January 1944

    During August 1943, 598 people were killed in AAF airplane crashes, making it the most deadly month of the war

    There were 18 fatal AAF accidents on 23 September 1943, the most accidents in one day

    The deadliest single day was 24 January 1943 when 51 people were killed in AAF aircraft accidents


    1941: 234 fatal AAF accidents

    1942: 1110 fatal AAF accidents

    1943: 2271 fatal AAF accidents

    1944: 1949 fatal AAF accidents

    1945: 798 fatal AAF accidents




    TonyM
    Home
     
  11. trackend

    trackend Active Member

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    Intresting posting TM thanks. My old man said that the losses suffered amoungst their troops when they started amphibious training for D-day soared. Unfortunately its the need for speed in turning out trained men that seemed to cause this sad loss of life.
     
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