Help on RAF paints

Discussion in 'Painting Questions, Tutorials and Guidebooks' started by Rustybugs, Dec 26, 2012.

  1. Rustybugs

    Rustybugs Banned

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    #1 Rustybugs, Dec 26, 2012
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2012
    Hi guys, after going thru 3 hundred posts to find out what I am looking for and trying the search function, I came up empty. So I am here to ask...

    As some of you may know, I am building a bunch of Spits and a Hurricane for 1/72 dioramas. Of all the different aircraft I have built and painted, this is the first time doing
    WWII RAF colors, I know which colors of paint to use, but my question is this: Since I am working in 1/72, would it be easier to paint the aircraft top one of the two
    colors completely, then do the fine line differentiating with the other color? If so, will the second color change that much being painted over the other color? If it will change darker,
    is there a way to compensate by perhaps lightening the second color? and visa/versa if it's lighter when over sprayed.

    Also, would it be better to make a mask for the camo, since the pattern on the Spits are almost identical with just a slight variation. The Airfix kits have very well done painting and camo references in the directions, some are in color!! Before, I could use my airbrush because the camo line differential was slightly fuzzy, not crisp like on the Spits.

    One more thing, since I have just now changed over to Humbrol enamel paints for these and future models... should I only use Humbrol brand for the clear coats or is there another brand that can be used that is better and won't bother the paint.

    Thanks
     
  2. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    It's down to personal preference the way you paint them Rusty. I sometimes paint the lighter colour first, with the darker colour (Dark Green) over the top, and sometimes paint them separately. In this scale, it's probably easier to paint the lighter top colour first, overall, then mask and paint the green. Obviously, paint and mask the underside first. The patterns on the Spit and Hurri were the same, to two versions, known as 'A' and 'B' Schemes, one being a mirror image of the other. Regardless of edge definition, in this scale a hard demarcation will be required.
    Virtually any clear coat can be used over Humbrol enamels - I've used this paint for 50 years, and it used to be the best in the World, but since the demise of Humbrol as a company and the loss of the factory, quality has declined substantially.
    Many of us here use 'Future' as a gloss coat, and I use this, mixed with Tamiya Flat Base, as a finish coat, when the proportion of Flat base can provide anything from a full matt, to a semi-gloss finish. Only small amounts of FB are needed, and this should be mixed thoroughly before use, and then tested on some painted scrap to determine the finish.
    Hope this helps.
     
  3. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    #3 stona, Dec 26, 2012
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2012
    There is some fairly strong (though not conclusive) evidence that the originals were masked,rather than sprayed freehand,which explains the second half of your sentence :)

    The demarcation was both tight and tightly regulated.

    I would second everything Airframes posted above. I would add that the use of the A and B schemes was abandoned quite early (Jan 1941)) as a means of speeding production. Spitfires and Hurricanes henceforth wore the A pattern.

    Generally,but by no means always,Spitfires with even serial numbers wore the A pattern,odd serials the B. For Hurricanes this was reversed.

    I'm an enamel painter too! I use Future/Klear and Vallejo varnishes over Humbrol and White Ensign enamels with no problems at all.

    Cheers

    Steve
     
  4. Rustybugs

    Rustybugs Banned

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    Great info guys and thanks a bunch. I have used future before but not over Humbrol, so was a little unsure. Nothing like spending hours on a hard paint job just to watch it crinkle when clear painting. Had that happen once but figured out what I had done wrong. It was a junk kit to practice on so it was worth the learning experience.
     
  5. Crimea_River

    Crimea_River Well-Known Member

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    There was one question you had that I'm not sure got answered and that is whether spray painting over another colour will change its appearance. The answer is yes and no, depending on the thickness of the coat you apply. If you apply just a few passes of thinly applied paint, the base paint will show through the paint you are applying, which is the basis behind the principle of "preshading". The more you apply, the less will show through and ultimately you should get an opaque finish with minimal if any evidence of the paint underneath. The key is to apply thin passes and not spend too much time in one spot.

    I agree with everything Terry and Steve said and will add that, in my opinion, regardless of soft vs hard demarcation, at 1/72 scale it is best to mask the camo as it's pretty tough getting a realistic soft edge in that scale using a free hand technique. It's tough enough in 1/48.
     
  6. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Although you won't need it for your Spits and Hurris, there is a way of obtaining an effective and convincing soft edge in 1/72nd scale, although it takes a little time and patience. Prepare a 50/50 mix of the two colours, and, using a fine lining brush (000 for example) paint in the demarcation, following the edges of the pattern. This gives the illusion of a sprayed, soft edge, and looks very convincing, even close up. OK, maybe not under a magnifying glass, but certainly to the naked eye and average model photograph.
     
  7. Crimea_River

    Crimea_River Well-Known Member

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    Yes. Another method I've seen, but that I have not had personal success with, is to use blue tack rolled into long worms of uniform diameter and laying these along the demarcation lines. Spraying perpendicular to the surface results in a soft edge, at least in theory. The larger the diameter, the softer the edge.
     
  8. Rustybugs

    Rustybugs Banned

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    Great tips guys, thank you! Will be trying out stuff this week and will post some pic of the results, maybe by the week end.
     
  9. Crimea_River

    Crimea_River Well-Known Member

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    Looking forward to it.
     
  10. destrozas

    destrozas Well-Known Member

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    well I I mention the paint scheme with airbrushing and without masks. defined or blurred edge with the airbrush can be done without chewing anything, everything is related to the pressure of the air travel of the needle and the viscosity of the paint, I always paint freehand without mask just to throw colors general (usually the bottom), the rest is freehand, and you're doing the edge "cut" (here I say knife) or dithering is more or less close to the model and more or less rapid movement, I usually work between 0.8 bar to normal and to 0.2 bars to define a line, is a matter of practice with your airbrush airbrush is difernte as each other.
    if you use masks for the camo it is best to not give a general color and then another as you notice a step between both painted first and then clear the dark is easier that way.
     
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