Japanese Maples

Discussion in 'Personal Gallery' started by ccheese, Mar 12, 2008.

  1. ccheese

    ccheese Member In Perpetuity
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    Hi All:

    Going to start a Personal Gallery of my Japanese Maples. The first part will
    be devoted to my grafts. Grafting is the only way to propagate the species.
    Taking a cutting (called a scion) of a known Japanese maple (called a cultivar), and attaching it to a young seed grown generic maple by means
    of a slice on the rootstock and inserting the scion, then wrapping with a
    budding rubber. After that the entire scion is enclosed in a small plastic
    bag, and tied with a twist tie. It must be kept in a lighted area inside.
    You'll know in about 10 -14 days if the grafts has taken.

    The following grafts were done in February and July of 2007.

    Enjoy....

    Charles
     

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  2. ccheese

    ccheese Member In Perpetuity
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    Here are a few more. The last Tsuma Gaki was kinda iffy. I thought the
    graft had taken, but it didn't bud out til today. I clipped the top of the
    rootstock just today. This was grafted in July of 2007.

    Charles
     

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  3. Thorlifter

    Thorlifter Well-Known Member

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    Awesome work Charles. Do you have any pics of big trees you have done or is this a new hobby?
     
  4. evangilder

    evangilder "Shooter"
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  5. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

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    Hey, that's neat Charles, good stuff!
     
  6. Erich

    Erich the old Sage
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    Charles you already have new bud wood and immature leaves I see. My mature J. Maples are still asleep, of course we are still getting frost and probably will through the month of April from time to time

    have you ever seen a specimen of the Koto NO Ito ? very unusual I must say

    your grafts look like they have taken well but am wondering what your success rate has been .......over 65 % in the past ?
     
  7. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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  8. ccheese

    ccheese Member In Perpetuity
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    Erich: My Koto No Ito is about five years old and maybe 3 feet high.
    I have two grafts of Koto, below is the older of the two.

    I've been grafting for about three years. My success rate for the first
    two was a big zero. Last year I had 14 take out of 36 attempts. Not
    a good average.

    I also have a Koto Ito Komache and an Abigail Rose, both rather rare.
    Counting my grafts I have about fifty cultivars, and perhaps 400 or
    so generic JM's, that I use for root stock or sell to landscapers.

    After I get the pic's of my grafts up, and the buds open on the cultivars,
    I'll put some of them up.

    My mentor is a PhD type from Auburn Univ. He's been quite good talking
    to me via email, or telephone. He recently send me 20 scions from four
    different JM's that I didn't have, which came from the grounds of Auburn
    Univ. They're in the garage, sitting on a heated sandbox.

    Charles
     

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  9. Erich

    Erich the old Sage
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    3 ' in 5 years is outstanding growth Charles, good for you, yes would like to see them when the buds have opened and slightly hardened off with the leaves. spring here is actually ahead of me, I have been pruning trees like it's out of style and am extremely worn out.....I need a long break to get back into my book project(s). Sad to see I have an old Beni Shidare Dissectum on the west side of my house which is begging to be cleaned out of dead twiggy wood .......... yeah what time.

    back to J. maples, Charles you have the outstanding work by a guy to my north Dr. J.D. Vertrees, His Jap maple book has been th3e standard on the cultivars of the time for many a year. Obviously there are at least 25 plus that have been introduced since the last printing..........and he may have passed on as well. We visited him back in the late 1970's, wow what a yard of trees and Rhody/Azaalea and Dogwoods
     
  10. ccheese

    ccheese Member In Perpetuity
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    Erich: I have the book Japanese Maples, By J.D. Vertrees, 3rd edition,
    revised by Peter Gregory. Vertrees died in 1993, and the heir to the throne
    is Gregory. There is a new book on JM's out, written by two Japanese guys.
    The book is big bucks, and I thought I'd wait awhile.

    As for my JM's I have four in the ground; Bloodgood, Crimson Queen,
    Sango Kaku (aka Coral Bark), and a Sharp's Pygmy. The Crimson Q.
    is about eight or so years old. It was in front of the dealership, and
    a P/U truck backed over it. I dug it up and brought it home and stuck
    it in the front yard. One side will take years to recover, but it's alive and
    well.

    If you'd like to try planting some seeds, lemme know. You can't just stick
    them in dirt, there's a trick to it.

    Charles
     
  11. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

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    Do you have a local nursery you buy them at?
     
  12. ccheese

    ccheese Member In Perpetuity
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    TL: I don't have anything you'd call big. My Crimson Queen is maybe
    four foot high. This type of tree does not get tall. After about four or five
    feet it boughs over and the longer branches head downward. I'll get a pic
    of it this weekend, but it hasn't budded out yet. I've been collecting JM's
    for about 6 years or so. Grafting is rather new for me.

    Sys: I have bought a few of my trees from MacDonalds Garden Nursery,
    but most have come from west coast nurseries, in Northern CA or Oregon.
    All of my generic JM's I've grown from seed.

    Charles
     
  13. Erich

    Erich the old Sage
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    I'll try to add my specimen trees when I can get time to figure out my digi camera, my Beni Shidare is about 8 feet tall now over 15/20feet wide, pruned out open per see, in the fall it glows even at night like a orange pumpkin. My Suminigashi palmate is over 20 feet tall turns deep crimson in the fall, next to it is a smaller 4-5 foot tall Virdis dissectum

    and yes Charels my 3 J. maples out on the west side of my house drop a truck load of seeds I have to pull starts out every year and throw them away.

    There are 6 other varieties of Jap maple on the north and back of my house as well. 2 of them have been in pots for over 15 years

    fun stuff
     
  14. ccheese

    ccheese Member In Perpetuity
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    Next time you have a "truckload" of seeds, fill up a zip-loc bag and
    send them to me. I'd love to have them.

    There's a trick to growing seeds, called stratification. Perhaps you know of
    it.

    Charles
     
  15. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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    Charles, geat stuff!

    You guys have lost me on the types but I used to grow roses so I'm sure if I started with Chrysler Imperials or Lady Di's your head might spin! :)

    Can you give us a little background about JMs? I always thought they were just small sized red maple trees. But your showing me there is a lot more.
     
  16. ccheese

    ccheese Member In Perpetuity
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    Chris: Without going too deep into the JM's, they're not all red. There are
    green ones (Viridis, Hogyoku), laceleafs, very small leaves (Baby Lace),
    verigated (Abigail Rose), long skinny leaves (Koto No Ito Koto Ito Komache).
    If you look at the one pic of the Koto No Ito, you'll see what I mean about
    long and skinny.

    There are trees that get very tall (Bloodgood others) and trees that will
    stay small forever. I have a Murisake Kiyohime that is about 6 years old
    that's maybe 24-26 inches high. Others will get about four or five feet
    tall, then bough over and head down (Crimson Queen). They are pretty
    much disease and pest free, also. But... they do not like fertilizer.
    A dusting of 10-10-10 will burn them up.

    To put it mildly, there is a JM for every yard, deck, porch, patio or balcony.

    BTW, if any of the members would like to have a nice one or two year
    old generic Japanese maple, I will be glad to send you one or two. They
    have survived a trip to Mississippi in a box, so they'd make it to anywhere
    in the US. The generics will get about 10 - 12 feet high and just as wide.


    I like to watch them in the fall.... from green to red to orange to yellow.

    Charles
     
  17. Erich

    Erich the old Sage
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    interesting thoughts Charles, but I will tell you in the PCNW where we grow these gorgeous gems we have all sorts of problems with roots coming to the surface as the species is not deep rooted, some leaf spots but that is the norm in the wetter climes of Washington southern Canada, and they do get aphids sometimes very bad in the spring till they are a messy sticky glop.

    I ya know what they take all sorts of fertilization without problem as long as you apply before the leaves unfold, and granted during a wet spring or very late winter, we are just now applying fertilizer applications now in my area, though we have been rather dry for the last 3 weeks.

    ~ Photos indicate the standards in Japan growing well over 40-60 feet in height and as in the states we have multi-tooted or large leafed maples so in Japan the Japonicum and palmate leaf patterned trees are very common with the butt-trunks several feet through. I have seen large specimens of Lace-leaf or dissectums ranging some 15 feet in height, most probably 100 year old trees - outstanding I must admit !!

    Put me down for a Koto No Ito or is it the strap like leaved Koto Ito Komachi ? -- later this year maybe,Charles ? and Yes I will transport you many seeds this late August early fall from the Suminigashi, Beni Shidare, Osakazuki and
    Tsukushigata which I have in a large container.....probably too confined, but the leaves are spectacular in spring and fall - flame orange red with yellow veins, bright green Samaras (seeds)
     
  18. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

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    I have that rose growing in my front yard!

    I grow orchids and cacti.

    Plus various citrus tree's.
     
  19. Erich

    Erich the old Sage
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    ah Citrus something that would croak at first frost in October up here, remembered my Dad picking fresh grapefruits every morn off their small spot near Phoneix years ago, man those were so sweet

    sys your orchids are hot house grown ? ...what varieties ?
     
  20. drgondog

    drgondog Well-Known Member

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    We had a difficult time keeping our Jm's unmolested by the Wolfie puppies - particularly around our pond feature..

    Still have to watch them like a hawk - ditto the palmetto- have no idea what the romance for munching trees is.
     
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