MAKETAR PAINT MASKS

Discussion in 'Questions on Kits, Decals, Tools and Pilots' started by fubar57, Apr 18, 2016.

  1. fubar57

    fubar57 Well-Known Member

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  2. Crimea_River

    Crimea_River Well-Known Member

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    Not me. Maketar...Make Tar. Lousy name for a clear parts mask!
     
  3. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

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    like the nose cone masks....
     
  4. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    #4 stona, Apr 19, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2016
    I've used their masks.
    I used the set they produce for the Do 335 on this model.

    [​IMG]

    And a combination of their generic national markings and custom made lettering on this one.

    [​IMG]

    I already have some more Maketar masks in for my next build, which will be Revell's He 219, whenever I get time to start it.

    I found them very good indeed. The vinyl is often re-useable, particularly for the less complex ones for letters, simple balkenkreuz etc.

    Reservations? You don't get any useful instructions, so if you haven't used masks before you might get in a tangle. Also, there is no transfer material provided, I use a square of Frisket film on the front of the masks to keep them in one piece as I move them, but unless I missed it Maketar don't give any advice on how to handle the masks.

    I would have no interest in those canopy masks as I usually do my own, unless custom ones come with a kit, but the 'cone' ones look interesting.

    Cheers

    Steve

    I should add that I've always received the masks from the Czech Republic within a few days to a week or so of ordering, depending on the vagaries of international postage services.
     
  5. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    I tend to mask using tape, mainly due to the restrictions caused by the lack of dexterity in my hands these days. Using a pre-cut mask could be very difficult for me, as the positioning would be awkward compared to placing and cutting tape in situ.
    But those 'nose cone' masks could be very useful, given I could position them accurately.
     
  6. fubar57

    fubar57 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys. I was looking at the canopy masks as I have a problem when it comes to clear parts with small round corners. You were on the right track when it comes to lifting the masks. I watched a video and Maketar recommends using Tamiya tape. Once I get proficient with an airbrush, these may be an option.


    Geo
     
  7. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    George, something which might help when masking - lay the tape over the frame area to be masked, and then trace the outline of the frame, using a retractable - type pencil, with the 'lead' sharpened to a chisel point, by rubbing it on fine wet n' dry paper, or fine sandpaper. Press down as you trace, which will also helps to burnish the tape along the edges of the intended cut line.
    Use a new, pointed blade in your scalpel, and carefully and slowly cut along the penciled line(s), then lift the unwanted tape.
    For curved areas, I tend to do this using a magnifying glass, to ensure that the tape is in exactly the required place, and to be certain that the blade has cut right through the tape - Tamiya type tape can sometimes 'drift' on the surface, and although a clean cut may seem to have been achieved, quite often a couple of fibre strands remain which, when the tape is lifted, can also lift the tape intended as the mask.
     
  8. Crimea_River

    Crimea_River Well-Known Member

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    That method certainly works for some but I prefer keeping sharp objects away from my clear parts. I love the Eduard masks when included in their kits but, in the majority of cases, I start with very thin strips of Tamiya tape which I carefully align to the frame edges. Once properly framed and burnished, I fill the rest in with larger bits of tape, sometimes using old, previously used pieces if they are sticky enough.
     
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