Nazi Landmines Block Egypt's Access to Oil and Gas

Discussion in 'WW2 General' started by syscom3, Mar 15, 2008.

  1. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2005
    Messages:
    12,631
    Likes Received:
    309
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    SPIEGEL ONLINE
    03/12/2008 12:11 PM
    LANDMINES IN THE DESERT SAND
    Nazi Landmines Block Egypt's Access to Oil and Gas

    By Joachim Hoelzgen

    German "Desert Fox" Erwin Rommel and the British Eighth Army left behind hundreds of thousands of mines and unexploded shells in their North African battles of World War II. The explosive relics are hampering Egypt's access to untapped oil and gas reserves in the desert.

    Egypt is one of the most heavily mined countries in the world. The unexploded ordnance left lying in its desert from World War II battles ranks the country right up there with Afghanistan on this dubious list. Every year, Bedouins and farmers come across unexploded mines and shells, and it's not uncommon for undiscovered bombs to explode amid retrieved scrap metal.

    Some 22 million landmines and unexploded ordnance have lain hidden in the northwest of Egypt since World War II, Fathy El-Shazly, national project director for mine clearance and development at the Ministry of International Cooperation, told United Nations news service Irin.

    Many of the mines are near the battlefield of El-Alamein, where the British Eighth Army forced the Africa Corps of "Desert Fox" Erwin Rommel to retreat all the way back to Tunisia. That war and today's peace lie close together in the no-man's-land of the desert. Anti-tank mines, anti-personnel mines and unexploded artillery shells block today's transportation routes.

    Mines Blocking Access Natural Resources

    The former battleground is a treasure trove of raw materials such as oil, natural gas and ore. Egypt used to be seen as a minor oil player but experts now estimate that 4.8 billion barrels of oil lie under the sands of the north west -- enough for the country to draw level with OPEC member Angola in terms of oil production.

    One oil field near El Alamein has already been developed, and oil is being produced in the notorious Qattara Depression, avoided by the British and German forces during World War II because of its hazardous salt lakes, high cliffs and fine-powdered sand, all of which made the area impassable for military vehicles.

    Egypt also has 1.94 trillion cubic meters of natural gas, which amounts to around 1.1 percent of global reserves, and an additional 0.38 trillion is estimated to be located in the northwest and the desert inland from the coast. Gas pipelines already run from two gas fields there to Alexandria. But mines are obstructing the search for more oil and gas.

    So far, the military has only removed 2.9 million mines and unexploded shells from the core battle area, and the removal has ground to a halt due to a shortage of funds. "The northwest coast has great development potential; the area is one of the greatest promises for Egypt. But the mines deny access to a landmass of approximately 22 percent of the national territory," El-Shazly told Irin.

    Mines Were a Key Tactic of Desert Warfare

    Wherever the armies of the Axis powers and the Allies clashed in the deserts of North Africa, they tried to limit each other's mobility by laying minefields. Rommel ordered half a million mines to be laid at the coastal town of El Alamein, and the British reportedly laid even more. Most of them lie in the main site of the battle south of the coast and in the inland desert. Mines were also placed underneath debris and around coastal fortifications.

    The region could have a flourishing future in tourism if it weren't for this explosive legacy. Egyptian billionaire Ibrahim Kamel, head of the Kato Group conglomerate, has already built an international airport at El Alamein as an entry point for European tourists. Kamel wants to build large hotels along a bay in the Mediterranean, and says the area could one day rival Egypt's Red Sea resorts. Charter aircraft from Britain already land at his airport, bringing tourists to the beaches and attractions west of El Alamein, for example in the provincial capital of Marsa Matruh.

    The Egyptian government and the UN also have plans to boost tourism and farming in the region, especially for barley and vegetables . That would allow 1.5 million people to be moved to the northwest from the overcrowded Nile valley -- if only it weren't for the mines.

    Munitions expert El-Shazly is now appealing to the powers that fought World War II to return to the desert with special mine detecting equipment and clean up their mess. A new mine clearing program is due to be launched this year, and the government plans to improve care for victims of mine explosions. More than 8,000 people have been injured or killed by German, Italian and British ordnance since the end of World War II.
     
  2. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2006
    Messages:
    36,714
    Likes Received:
    1,053
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Nightshift picker
    Location:
    A Swede living in Glasgow, Scotland
    Home Page:
    Why do they ALWAYS refer to them as Nazis??? Why not "Old WWII German Mines"?
     
  3. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Messages:
    23,053
    Likes Received:
    993
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Animal Control Officer
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    Because Nazi mines really hurt. Its a sterotype - from the media.
     
  4. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2005
    Messages:
    12,631
    Likes Received:
    309
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    Because the Nazi's started the war.
     
  5. Konigstiger205

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2007
    Messages:
    915
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Occupation:
    student
    Location:
    Bucharest
    Its a common thing such as using the word soviet to describe everything that belongs to the former Soviet Union...
     
  6. Glider

    Glider Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2005
    Messages:
    6,160
    Likes Received:
    128
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Consellor
    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    I have to agree with the wish that the mines should be referred to as old WW2 mines as I am sure more than a few were British.

    I also admit to finding it a little unlikely that a sortage of funds to clear mines is stoping access to billions of barrels of oil. If that isn't worth the investment, then I don't know what is.
     
  7. peter ocker

    peter ocker New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2008
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    as usual, although it's written "German "Desert Fox" Erwin Rommel and the British Eighth Army ", we only talk on the German Mines.
    Dakar rally 2003 went from Marseille to Sharm El Sheik, and at the border Libya-Egypt, a racetruck assisting KTM motorcycles drove on a british mine, fortunately nobody was injured as it exploded under the rear axle.
    Nobody talks on that. And on the hundreds of people injured every week by mines spread in Afghanistan or throughout Afrika - definitely not Nazi mines, but produced by the former power nations.
    Regards, Peter
     
  8. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2006
    Messages:
    36,714
    Likes Received:
    1,053
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Nightshift picker
    Location:
    A Swede living in Glasgow, Scotland
    Home Page:
    War was started by Germany by attacking Poland September 1st 1939...yes. I still think that it's not fair to be honest....not all german soldiers were nazis during the war, Wermacht or SS....
    What a "few" do, makes the whole bunch take the flak...:lol: :lol:
    Anyhoo....must be quite a few landmines left out in the desert, Axis and Allied.
     
  9. Kiwikid

    Kiwikid Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2006
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Occupation:
    Airline catering
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    For my part I think it is better to refer to the Nazi regime rather than the German people. To refer to negative aspects of the war as German tars all German people with the objectives of the Nazi regime.

    I was wondering are there still any reasonably intact Panzer IV left on the battlefield there ?
     
  10. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2007
    Messages:
    12,162
    Likes Received:
    123
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    The back of beyond
    Well said mate.
     
  11. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2006
    Messages:
    36,714
    Likes Received:
    1,053
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Nightshift picker
    Location:
    A Swede living in Glasgow, Scotland
    Home Page:
    It's a thin line to walk on, isn't it? :lol:
     
  12. Soren

    Soren Banned

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2005
    Messages:
    6,624
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Probably under the sand somewhere.. IIRC there are still wrecks of Shermans standing in the open down there.
     
Loading...

Share This Page