South American Air Forces

Discussion in 'Aircraft Pictures' started by gekho, Dec 24, 2010.

  1. gekho

    gekho Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,816
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Lawyer
    Location:
    Spain
    This is a subjet I wanted to deal with for long time, but sadly it is being very difficult to find pictures and information about the planes that flew under the latin colours in america. That means I havent enough information for a single thread for each Air Force, so I have no chance but to put all them on the same post. Perhaps with the Argentinian and the Uruguayan Air Forces I could make an exception, but I have finally decided that for an homogeneous and deep treatment of these Air Forces it would be better to study them at the same time.

    I hope you enjoy the thread
     
  2. gekho

    gekho Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,816
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Lawyer
    Location:
    Spain
    On May 20, 1929, the aviation divisions of the Peruvian Army and Navy were merged into the Cuerpo de Aviación del Perú (Peruvian Aviation Corps, abbreviated CAP). During the Colombia-Peru War of 1933, its Vought O2U Corsair and Curtiss F11C Hawk planes fought in the Amazon region. The CAP lost three aircraft to the Colombian Air Force . The corps was renamed Cuerpo Aeronáutico del Perú (Peruvian Aeronautical Corps, also abbreviated CAP) on March 12, 1936. In 1941, the CAP participated in the Peruvian-Ecuadorian War. At that time, the CAP were equipped with Caproni Ca.114 and North American NA.50 Torito fighters, Douglas DB-8A-3P attack aircraft, and Caproni Ca.135 Tipo Peru and Caproni Ca.310 Libeccio bombers, among others.

    During the presidency of Manuel A. Odría the corps was reorganized again and on July 18, 1950 it became the Fuerza Aérea del Perú (Air Force of Peru, abbreviated FAP). In the 1950s the FAP was modernized to the jet age with the arrival of the English Electric Canberra bombers and the Hawker Hunter, Lockheed F-80 Shooting Star and North American F-86 Sabre fighters. The service underwent a period of considerable expansion through out the 1970s and early 1980s which included the acquisition of French-made Dassault Mirage 5P and 5DP, U.S. made Cessna A-37B Dragonfly attack aircraft, Lockheed C-130 and L-100-20 Hercules transport aircraft, and the introduction of an important number of Soviet-made aircraft, including Sukhoi Su-22 bombers and Antonov An-26 and An-32 transport aircraft, as well as Mil Mi-8, Mi-17 and Mi-25 helicopters. In 1982, during the Falklands War, the Peruvian Air Force transferred ten of their Mirage 5P to the Argentine Air Force as a measure of solidarity. The economic crisis of the later 1980s forced reductions in the fleet size as well as cuts in training and general readiness.

    Under those conditions the FAP fought the Cenepa War against Ecuador in 1995 and lost five planes and helicopters. After the war, in 1996 the FAP acquired MiG-29 fighters and in 1998 Su-25 attack fighters arrived, which along with Mirage 2000 fighters acquired in the late 1980s, are currently the main combat elements of the FAP.
     

    Attached Files:

  3. gekho

    gekho Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,816
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Lawyer
    Location:
    Spain
    In 1932 the El Arma de Aviación del Ejército Nacional was formed as part of the Dominican Army. Until 1942 only about a dozen aircraft were purchased. The service was renamed Compañia de Aviación del Ejército Nacional on October 26, 1942. Whilst granting base facilities to the United States during World War II the Dominican Republic received limited quantities of Lend-Lease military equipment. In 1947 a group of Dominican Republic exiles from Cuba tried to invade the country. The government wanted to receive large quantities of bombers and fighters aircraft from the United States, but the government blocked these sales and prevented sales of the Canadian government to President Trujillo. But agents of the president managed to buy some Beaufighter and Mosquito aircraft from the United Kingdom. After signing the Rio Treaty 1947 the Dominican Republic received large quantities of aircraft, for example 25 P-47D fighter-bomber and 30 AT-6 trainers from the United States. With this influx of aircraft the Compañia de Aviación expanded and became an independent service on January 15, 1948, and was renamed Cuerpo de Aviación Militar Dominicana. It moved its headquarters to Base Aérea Presidente Trujillo, in the capital's suburb of San Isidro.

    The Air Force underwent several name changes during the 1950s, being known as the Dominican Military Aviation during 1952-55 and 1957–62 and as the Dominican Air Force during 1955-57. In 1962 it again became known as the Dominican Air Force, the name is still in use today.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. gekho

    gekho Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,816
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Lawyer
    Location:
    Spain
    In 1952, 25 Vampires and 32 North American P-51D were bought from Sweden but similar purchases from Canada and Japan were again blocked by the United States. By 1956 the Fuerza Aérea Dominicana had about 240 aircraft. During the next years most of the post-war equipment was at the end of its useful life. After the assassination of President Trujillo in 1961 funds for the Air Force decreased and in 1963 the Air Force had only 110 aircraft.

    During the next 15 years the number of aircraft in the Air Force declined again and only second-line material, such as training aircraft or helicopters, were acquired. In the early 1980s the Fuerza Aérea Dominicana had about 80 aircraft in five operational squadrons with most of the aircraft and helicopters operating out of San Isidro Air Base in Santo Domingo.

    On the 22nd of September 1998 Hurricane George striked San Isidro the main FAD base and destroyed one hangar and severely damaged another, destroying the aircraft in both hangars. The natural disaster saw the FAD new aircraft enter service such as eight ENAER T-35 Pilláns that were delivered in two batches, the first in November 1999 and the second in January 2000. During the same period two CASA 212-400 transport planes were ordered.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. ccheese

    ccheese Member In Perpetuity
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    12,669
    Likes Received:
    96
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Occupation:
    R E T I R E D !!
    Location:
    Virginia Beach, Va.
    Good pic's, thanks for sharing...

    Charles
     
  6. Gnomey

    Gnomey World Travelling Doctor
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Messages:
    41,800
    Likes Received:
    519
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Doctor
    Location:
    Portsmouth / Royal Deeside, UK
    Home Page:
    Nice shots!
     
  7. gekho

    gekho Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,816
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Lawyer
    Location:
    Spain
    On December 31, 1919 the government of Colombia released funding for the formation of the Escuela Militar de Aviacion (military aviation school), marking the birth of Colombian military aviation. The school initially operated under the control of the Colombian army, and based at Flandes, it operated eleven aircraft supplied by France: three Caudron G3s, for Caudron G4s and four Nieuport 17s. Unfortunately the school closed within two years due to financial difficulties.

    In 1925 the school made a restart at Madrid, near Bogotà, with three Wild WT-3s supplied by Switzerland. Full expansion came in 1932 after a Peruvian attempt to capture Colombia's southernmost town of Leticia, and in 1934 the military operated as many as 150 aircraft. The assistance of the Colombian-German airline of SCADTA was instrumental in these years, and could be traced back to several subtypes of Junkers and Dorniers, operated by the military. Later on, American aircraft, like Curtiss Hawk II biplanes, were obtained, and the school moved on to its current base at Calì. With the assistance of SCADTA a new base was developed at Palanquero near Puerto Salgar, on the banks of the Rio Magdalena, about 60 miles northwest of Bogotà. The Aviacion Militar received new American equipment when the USA became involved in World War Two in 1941, and the country benefited from various lend-lease deliveries of North American T-6 Texans and Boeing PT-17 Stearmans for pilot training. Soon after World War Two, the Fuerza Aérea Colombiana became an independent part of the armed forces.

    After a period of relative peace, internal political struggle broke out in 1948 with La Violencia, the most destructive of Colombia's civil wars, which lasted almost ten years. Not surprisingly, the equipment obtained by the military at that time was optimised for counterinsurgency tasks, resulting in the acquisition of many B-26C Invaders. During these years, the FAC acquired its first jet aircraft in 1954 in the form of the legendary T-bird and a limited air defence force was built up with six Canadian Sabre 6s operated from Palanquero. Sixteen F-80 Shooting Stars were also delivered. Meanwhile, several types of training helicopters were taken on strength.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. gekho

    gekho Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,816
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Lawyer
    Location:
    Spain
    Around 1960 the military transport element expanded, with vast numbers of the legendary Dakota being delivered, and the military airline of SATENA being formed at El Dorado, in order to service remote locations all over the country, displaying the social function of the air force in Colombia. More modern types like the C-130 Hercules, UH-1 Huey, T-37 Tweety Bird and T-41 Mescalero were obtained during the sixties. In 1972 Colombia joined the Mirage-family with the introduction of the Mirage 5 at Palanquero, eighteen of these entered service in three different versions.

    Further expansion took place in the eighties with considerable deliveries of the OA-37B Dragonfly, which earned fame over Vietnam. At the end of the decade a batch of Kfir C2 fighters was delivered from Israel and subsequently upgraded to Kfir C7 by the Comando Aéreo de Mantenimiento (CAMAN) in Madrid in the nineties. The Mirages were upgraded to the same standard by CAMAN, with the installation of canards and improved fuel systems. Both types are also equipped for air-to-air refuelling from the FAC's sole Boeing 707 tanker and transport aircraft. The nineties saw the delivery of specialised COIN-aircraft like the OV-10A Bronco and Embraer Tucano trainers, some of the latter are able to carry bombs and unguided rockets. These aircraft operate mainly over the east of the country, where the Los Llanos region has a high level of guerrilla activity. They regularly deploy to Puerto Carreño under the commando of the Grupo Aéreo del Oriente formed in 2000. To deal with continuing guerrilla activity Escuadrones Aerotácticos (tactical squadrons) were formed at the main FAC bases in the late nineties, consisting of several types of helicopters and AC-47 gunships supplied by their respective Grupos.

    The 1999 'Plan Colombia' emphasizes on technology, rather than on large numbers of new aircraft being procured, although several new Black Hawk-helicopters (dubbed Arpía in Colombian service) entered FAC service in recent years. Other recently acquired types include Schweizer SA2-37A Condors and Cessna 560 Citations equipped with cameras and sensors to monitor guerrilla and narcotic related activities. Technology upgrades are scheduled for the Bronco fleet, the venerable AC-47 gunships and Huey-helicopters.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. evangilder

    evangilder "Shooter"
    Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2004
    Messages:
    19,419
    Likes Received:
    137
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    Network Engineer/Photographer
    Location:
    Moorpark, CA
    Home Page:
    The flying C-47 looks like a Basler conversion. Very cool stuff.
     
  10. Gnomey

    Gnomey World Travelling Doctor
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Messages:
    41,800
    Likes Received:
    519
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Doctor
    Location:
    Portsmouth / Royal Deeside, UK
    Home Page:
    Certainly they aren't original engines.

    Nice shots!
     
  11. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    Messages:
    51,215
    Likes Received:
    849
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Adelaide Sth. Aust.
  12. gekho

    gekho Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,816
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Lawyer
    Location:
    Spain
    #12 gekho, Dec 26, 2010
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2011
    The first step towards the current FACh was taken by Teniente Coronel Pedro Pablo Dartnell, when he founded the Servicio de Aviación Militar de Chile (Military Aviation Service of Chile) on December 20, 1910, being trained as a pilot in France. Although a school was included, the first officers were sent to France for their training as well. One of them, Captain Manuel Ávalos Prado, took command over the Chilean military aviation school that was officially instated 11 February 1913, and remained in command until 1915. The Escuela de Aviación Militar (Military Aviation School) was named in honor of him in 1944, and still carries that name today.

    In those early years many aviation milestones were achieved; conquering the height of The Andes was one of the main targets as well as long distance flights. Typical aircraft of that era were Avro 504, Bleriot XI, Bristol M.1C, DH.9, and SE5a. In the following decade, the (Airmail Line of Chile) Línea Aeropostal de Chile was created on 5 March 1929 as a branch of the military aviation. This postal airline later developed into the airline Línea Aérea Nacional (National Airline) that is still the leading airline in Chile today. Shortly afterwards, on 21 March 1930, the existing aviation elements of the army and navy were amalgamated into a dedicated department: the Subsecretaria de Aviación (Department of the Air Force) effectively creating the current independent Air Force. It was initially named Fuerza Aérea Nacional(National Air Force). The international airport of Chile carries the name of Lan's founding father and first commander of the air force, Arturo Merino Benítez.

    The first outlines of the organization of the current air force were visible in 1945 with the inception of Grupo de Transporte No.1 (First Transport Group), later renumbered Grupo 10, with two C-45s and a single T-6 Texan at Los Cerrillos. Two years later the first Fuerza Aérea flight to Antarctica was performed. The fifties meant entry into the jet age for the FACh, and Grupo 7 was the first unit to receive them in 1954. Chile got its aircraft from both the United States and Europe. The American supply consisted of Lockheed F-80, Lockheed T-33, Beech T-34 Mentor, Cessna T-37, Cessna A-37 Dragonfly and Northrop F-5E/F for example, whereas the British supplied Hawker Hunters and the French delivered various helicopters and Dassault Mirage 50 aircraft. The Chilean air force hosted the joint exercise Salitre with other friendly nations.
     

    Attached Files:

  13. CharlesBronson

    CharlesBronson Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2005
    Messages:
    3,822
    Likes Received:
    66
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Metalurgic Technician
    Location:
    Cordoba - Argentina
  14. gekho

    gekho Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,816
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Lawyer
    Location:
    Spain
    This Central-American country is widely known for the traces of the Mayan culture that can still be found. Therefore, it is no surprise that tourism is the most important source of income for Guatemala followed by agriculture. Its population numbering about 9,8 million can be roughly divided in Mayan and Spanish (arriving in 1524) roots, about 50% each. Physically, Mexico and Belize in the North and Honduras and El Salvador in the South border Guatemala.

    It has a long pacific coastline on the West and a tiny one to the Caribbean in the Southeast of the country. In the post War period, the republic saw its far share of internal turmoil. The October revolution in 1944 brought an end to a long history of dictatorship but the influence of the United Fruit Company was not subdued. Many reforms including a democratic constitution were made. This by no means meant a quiet political scene: the first president survived 20 military coups in his five-year incumbency! The government and United Fruit went head to head for some years and the United States backed a military coup because the government was alleged to be infiltrated by communists and the interests of US companies - like United Fruit -needed to be protected (or so it seemed). Shortly after the take over, in June 1954, a law suite was filed against United Fruit and its influence was broken.

    The military rule lasted for three decades and this period saw guerrilla activities, suppression of left-wing sympathisers, war-atrocities and withdrawal of US support for a period of time. The civil war finally ended in 1984 and elections were held in 1985. Dialogue was started with the guerrillas. The early nineties went by against a backdrop of civil unrest and failing government policies. Finally, on December 29,1996 a peace treaty was signed.
     

    Attached Files:

  15. gekho

    gekho Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,816
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Lawyer
    Location:
    Spain
    In November 1942, the Guatemalan government was interested in acquiring seven of the nine remaining P-26s. By the time there was a U.S. congressional prohibition on selling "lethal" armament to the Latin American Countries (except Brazil and Mexico), but the U.S. Army was very interested in getting rid of the obsolete planes, and reported them as Fairchild PT-26 "Trainers" on the sale documents. In the early 1943, finally, four P-26s were delivered to FAG, and two more in May. The planes were officially handed over by the end of that month. One last plane was delivered crated, for spares, but the FAG mechanics quickly made it airworthy.

    The planes gained the serial numbers 42 to 49, and an unusual paint scheme was applied to all of them, including a badge on the fuselage showing a Mayan cacique. Shortly after the final delivery, one of the planes ( FAG 42 ) was damaged beyond repair while taxiing prior to take off. The P-26 stumbled into a small rut on the taxiway and the right landing gear collapsed. It was being piloted by Lt. Rene Sarmiento, who was one of the few qualified FAG pilots to fly the Peashooters.

    The Peashooters became the FAG's "Pride and joy" and the classic line ups on La Aurora main ramp were usual upon arriving dignitaries. Although, the lack of qualified pilots increased and the planes were seldom flown. By 1945, only three FAG pilots were P-26 certified. During the Castillo Armas liberation forces invasion on June 1954, none of the P-26 were used to repel the CIA's F-47 attacks, mainly due to the lack of IFR capabilities of the type and bad weather over the attacked areas. It is worth mentioning that the only IFR capable planes in FAG service at that time were the T-6, but the navigation instruments of this planes were out of order due to the lack of spares. On June 19 1954, two P-26s were destroyed on the ground during an attack to La Aurora Air Base, and the next day, another P-26 crashed near San Pedro Pinula while conducting a surveillance flight around the Guatemala city. The pilot, Maj. Pedro Granados, survived the crash.

    By July 1954, the surviving Peashooters went through another change in their painting schemes, and were re-serialled with a very strange numeration. (After the overthrown of the Arbenz government, all FAG aircraft were re-serialled, being used four digits on each serial number instead of two.) At this time, only five pilots were P-26 certified, but, somehow, they avoided to fly the planes, arguing that the P-26 was unsafe to fly, specially on landings. In the late 1956, only two P-26 remained airworthy, those being FAG 0672 and FAG 0816. Later one of them was acquired by the Planes of Fame museum of Chino, California, and the other by the Smithsonian Air Space museum. The one with the Planes of Fame Museum is flyable to this date.
     

    Attached Files:

  16. gekho

    gekho Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,816
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Lawyer
    Location:
    Spain
    You can see another Ar-95 landplane in my thread about the nationalist air force. And thank you for these sites; they are great!!
     
  17. gekho

    gekho Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,816
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Lawyer
    Location:
    Spain
    Military aviation in Nicaragua can be traced back as far as 1920 when four Curtiss JN-2s were acquired, although it was not until 1936 that the Cuerpo de Aviacion (aviation corps) of the National Guard was formed under Anastacio Tacho Somoza. Just two years later the name of the air corps was changed to Fuerza Aérea de la Guardia Nacional on 9 June 1938. By July 1942 lend-lease funds accounted for the delivery of more aircraft from the USA. After WW II more surplus US assets became available, enabling the air force to grow to maturity. After Nicaragua signed the Rio Treaty in 1947 it received its first combat aircraft, a batch of twelve P-47 Thunderbolts. By that time the force was known as Fuerza Aérea de Nicaragua (FAN). During the murky times which saw the CIA inspired invasion of Guatemala in 1954-1955 the FAN managed to obtain four more P-47N Thunderbolts. These were followed by 26 P-51D Mustangs and 15 T-6G Texans. In 1957, was broke out with Honduras over the Mesquita region. A cease-fire was reached and the Coco-river was recognized as the border between the two countries. The jet era started in 1962, when six T-33As were delivered, followed by one more in 1963.

    >From 1978, full scale civil war broke out when FSLN-revolutionaries tried to overthrow the hated Somozo dynasty. The rebels were assisted by a fleet of various transports bringing in weapons and ammunitions. In the seventies, the FAN main additions were transport aircraft, like DHC-3 Otters and CASA 212 Aviocars. When Somoza finally fled the country in July 1979, five T-33As, one B-26, six T-28s, six Cessna 337s, two CASA 212s, three C-47s, two IAI201 Aravas, one Huey, three S-58Ts, four OH-6As and various Cessnas and Pipers were left behind. On 18 September 1979 the new Sandinist government set up the Fuerza Aérea Sandinista and took over the inventory.

    As soon as 1980, the Sandinist government sent seventy cadets to Bulgaria for pilots training. Russian and Cuban advisors and construction teams were flown in to expand the military infrastructure, resulting in the construction and improvement of many airbases. One large new airbase was constructed just north of Nicaragua near Punte Huete, in order to receive MiG-21s. Large numbers of Mi-8 and Mi-25 assault and combat helicopters were delivered between 1981 and 1990, although many were lost to Contra fire. In April 1983, Libyan cargo aircraft were intercepted in Brazil, intended to deliver L-39 Albatros light attack aircraft to Nicaragua. The Contras also built up a considerable air force, containing C-47s, C-123s, Cessna 337s, Pipers and various helicopters. In 1990, elections were held bringing an end to the Sandinist rule and more important, to war. The air force was renamed Fuerza Aérea Nicaraguënse soon after.

    In 1992, most surviving Mi-25 Hinds were sold to Peru, alongside about twelve Mi-8MT Hips. Only about fifteen Hips remain in service. The name of the air force changed again in 1995 to Fuerza Aérea - Ejército de Nicaragua, after it lost its independent status and became an integral branch of the Nicaraguan armed forces. The air force currently has only two operational squadrons, a fraction of its size in the eighties. No new aircraft were bought after the turnover of the Sandinistas. The Escuadrón de Transporte operates the remaining two An-26s, two An-2s and a single Cessna 404. The Escuadrón de Ala Rotativa is responsible for the operation of the Hips. Both squadrons are based at Managua's Cesar Sandino airport, although the Hips can also be found at Bluefields, Montelimar, Puerto Cabezas, Punta Huete, San Carlos, Juigalpa, Matagalpa and Siuna. Training is carried out with the Escuela de Aviacion, based at Los Brasiles.
     

    Attached Files:

  18. gekho

    gekho Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,816
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Lawyer
    Location:
    Spain
    #18 gekho, Dec 27, 2010
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2011
    Military aviation started in 1913 with the purchase of an Deperdussin T. In 1914 an Escuela de Aviación Militar (EAM) was formed and operated under the control of the Paraguay Army, with one Henri Farman and two Bleriot aircraft and Teniente Silvio Pettrossi as first dircetor. Pettrossi died on October 17, 1916, when he crashed with the Deperdussin T in Buenos Aires. After three years without flight activity the EAM was reactivated with the acquisition of one each Macchi-Lohner L-3 flying boat and Macchi M-7.

    At the beginning of 1922 there was no operational aircraft in Paraguay. From May 1922 army officers rebelled against the government of President Ayala. Both sides tried to buy aircraft and recrut pilots in Argentina. The first aircraft, which the government forces got, was an Armstrong Whitworth F.K.8, followed by a single SPAD S.XX, two Italian built S.A.M.L. A.3s, two Ansaldo SVA-5s and one SVA-10 operating out of Base Aérea Ñu-Guazú/ Asunción. The first operational mission to bomb rebel positions was flown on June 29, 1922. During August 1922 the rebel forces bought four Ansaldo aircraft in Argentina and started to fly combat operations. At the end the government forces were victorious.

    Tension with Bolivia grow from 1927 about the Chaco region and on January 13, 1929 Paraguay commenced mobilisation. After some skirmished in 1932 the congress of Paraguay called up reservists. On September 9, 1932 the first major aerial combat of the war occured, when two Bolivian aircraft met two Paraguay aircraft at Fortín Boquerón and managed to shot down one Potez 25A of the Pagarguay Air Force. During the next months there were many additional engagements between the two Air Forces. During 1933 the war became more static, as both sides fortified their defensive positions. There were no air engagements from June 1933 till June 1934. The last air combat took place on January 10, 1935, almost 6 month before the cease fire. Paraguay lost 11 aircraft during this conflict. From 1935 the air force was called Arma Aérea Paraguay, still under Army control.

    During World War Two Paraguay did not declare war on the Axis powers until February 1945. The Air Force did not receive large quantities of aircraft though the Lend-Lease Program, but only about 35 training and transport aircraft including BT-13A and PT-19A.

    After a failed coup in December 1946 a full-scale civil war broke out with both sides operating aircraft. The rebels formed an Arma Aérea Revolucionaria with eight aircraft from defected pilots of the government air force on March 8, 1947. Some days later they attacked government positions at Belén-Cué and Paso Né, near San Pedro. During the next months, there were several operations by both air forces to support their respective ground forces. The revolution ended on August 20, 1947 and all rebel aircraft fled to Brazil and Argentina. They were later returned to Paraguay.

    The Air Force entered the jet age, when they bought some EMB-326 Xavante in 1979. During the next years only small quantities of combat, liaison and transport aircraft were aquired. The Air Force became an independent service only on 26.7.1989 and renamed Fuerza Aérea Paraguay (FAP). Today the FAP is organised in the I Brigada Aérea, Brigada Aerotransportada "Silvio Pettirossi" and the Comando de Institutos Aeronauticos de Ensenanza, which were formed 1991.
     

    Attached Files:

  19. Gnomey

    Gnomey World Travelling Doctor
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Messages:
    41,800
    Likes Received:
    519
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Doctor
    Location:
    Portsmouth / Royal Deeside, UK
    Home Page:
    Good stuff, keep it coming.
     
  20. gekho

    gekho Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,816
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Lawyer
    Location:
    Spain
    Military aviation in Bolivia began in 1917, with the training of three Army officers at the El Palomar aviation school in Argentina, but the Cuerpo de Aviadores Militares Bolivianos (Bolivian Military Aviators Corps) was not officially formed until 1924, during the celebrations of Bolivia's first centenary of independence. In the year 1932 the Gran Chaco dispute between Bolivia and Paraguay had evolved into a shooting war and by this period they changed the name into Cuerpo de Aviación (Aviation Corps). It was actually the first in the Latin Americas with air combat. The war ended in 1935. Bolivia was defeated and economically exhausted, and it was clearly impossible to carry on the long-delayed re-organisation of the Cuerpo, at least without outside help.

    The Cuerpo de Aviación was further re-organised in 1944 along USAAF lines to become the Fuerza Aérea Boliviana (Bolivian Air Force), with most of its aircraft of US manufacture. The FAB was at first under partial Army control, but became totally independent in 1957. Bolivia signed the Rio Pact in 1947 and the usual Military Assistance Program deliveries followed - initially small numbers of North American AT-6 Texan armed trainers and B-25J Mithchell bombers, followed in mid-1956 by seven Boeing B-17G Fortress bomber/transports. Four years later the first real fighter aircraft arrived in the shape of Cavalier modified F-51D Mustangs and large numbers of aircraft from neighbour Brazil, including Brazilian built Fairchild PT-19 trainers and Fokker S-11 basic trainers. In 1973 the FAB entered the jet age with the first of fifteen Canadair T-33 Mk.3 Silver Stars. In December 1980 permission was granted for the acquisition of up to twenty-four fighters, the Mirage 5, Jaguar and Kfir C2 all being considered, but little seems to have come on this, and there were reports during late 1981 that ex Belgian Air Force Starfighters may be acquired, however in vain. In 1986 the FAB signed a US$52 miljon contract with FMA for the delivery of twelve IA.58 Pucará COIN aircraft, however the deal went off. The FAB saw in late 80's the delivery of a further eighteen former French Air Force Canadair built T-33SF to form a nother Grupo de Caza. The FAB is largely depending on US funds, and it is believed that in the coming years only a handful of modern aircraft will be bought. A possibility is that the FAB is to get some former Brazilian Air Force AT-26 Xavantes, now they become available after retirement. The only project today is the modernisation of eighteen T-33's by the Kelowna company in Canada, and most of the T-Birds have been returned to Bolivia.
     

    Attached Files:

Loading...

Share This Page