you here what happended last night ?

Discussion in 'Old Threads' started by fly boy, Feb 21, 2008.

  1. fly boy

    fly boy Member

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    did you guys here about the spy thing that got destroyed?
     
  2. wilbur1

    wilbur1 Active Member

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    Nope not one thing about it
     
  3. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
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    Its not a secret. They blew up the Sat...
     
  4. Evil_Merlin

    Evil_Merlin Member

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  5. fly boy

    fly boy Member

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    yea i find it odd that they blow it up in one shot
     
  6. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
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  7. fly boy

    fly boy Member

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    well it was a heat seeking missle and that sat was cold
     
  8. Evil_Merlin

    Evil_Merlin Member

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    You do realize that the SM2 and especially the SM3 have incercepted much more complicated trajectory objects before?

    The first mission of this test series, Flight Mission Four (FM-4), was flown on 21 November 2002 resulting in a third consecutive successful intercept for the program. Flight Mission-4 (FM-4) involved the firing of a developmental Standard Missile 3 (SM-3) from the Aegis ballistic missile defense cruiser USS Lake Erie to engage a ballistic missile target launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) on the island of Kauai, Hawaii. FM-4 also provided a key verification of SM-3’s capability to accurately hit the target at a predefined point for lethality which, for this test, was forward of the target center. The KW impacted within centimeters of the aimpoint, completely destroying the target avionics section.

    FM-5 on 18 June 2003 failed in an attempt to intercept its target. A developmental Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) was launched from the U.S. Navy cruiser, USS Lake Erie (CG-70), in a Missile Defense Agency test near Kauai, Hawaii. The main mission of Aegis ballistic missile defense Flight Mission-5 (FM-5) was to evaluate the SM-3 kinetic warhead's guidance, navigation and control operation in space using an upgraded solid divert and attitude control system (SDACS). FM-5 was the second of a planned six flight test series within the missile defense Block 2004 time period to develop a sea based ballistic missile defense against short to intermediate range ballistic missiles. FM-5 is the second developmental flight test against more complex, stressing, and operationally realistic ballistic missile engagement scenarios.

    On 11 December 2003 Flight Mission-6 (FM-6) involved the detection and tracking of an Aries medium-range target missile launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Kauai, Hawaii at 8:10am HST (1:10pm EST). FM-6 was the third of planned six flight test series within the missile defense Block 2004 time period. Approximately two minutes after target launch, a developmental Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) was launched from the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense cruiser the USS LAKE ERIE (CG 70). Approximately two minutes later the SM-3 successfully intercepted the target missile with hit to kill technology, using only the force of the direct collision to destroy the target. This was the fourth successful intercept for Aegis BMD and SM-3. Between January 2002 and late 2004, the Aegis BMD system had successfully intercepted targets in space four times with SM-3. In all the flight tests, the SM-3 was launched from a US Navy cruiser under increasingly realistic, operational conditions.

    On 24 February 2005 the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) Weapon System and Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) destroyed a ballistic missile outside the earth's atmosphere during an Aegis BMD Program flight test over the Pacific Ocean. The Feb. 24 mission -- the fifth successful intercept for SM-3 -- was the first firing of the Aegis BMD "Emergency Deployment" capability using operational versions of the SM-3 Block I missile and Aegis BMD Weapon System. This was also the first test to exercise SM-3's third stage rocket motor (TSRM) single-pulse mode. The SM-3 was launched from the Aegis BMD cruiser USS Lake Erie (CG 70) and hit a target missile that had been launched from the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kauai, Hawaii. FM-7 was the fourth of a planned six flight test series within the missile defense Block 2004 time period, was scheduled for the 3rd quarter of FY2003 as of February 2002.

    On 17 November 2005 a test involved for the first time a "separating" target, meaning that the target warhead separated from its booster rocket requiring the interceptor to distinguish between the body of the missile and the actual warhead. The interceptor missile was launched from the Pearl Harbor-based Aegis cruiser USS Lake Erie (CG 70). The target was intercepted more than 100 miles in space above the Pacific Ocean and 375 miles northwest of Kauai. FM-8 the fifth of a planned six flight test series within the missile defense Block 2004 time period, scheduled for the 1st quarter of FY2004 as of February 2002. By February 2004 this test was scheduled for the 2nd quarter of FY2005.

    A Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) was launched on March 8, 2006 from the USS Lake Erie (CG 70) in a Missile Defense Agency and Japan Defense Agency joint test in the Pacific. The Joint Control Test Vehicle-1 (JCTV-1) cooperative test demonstrated the SM-3 with a Japan-designed advanced nosecone. The flight test, a milestone in a joint cooperative research project, is an example of the ongoing coordination between the U.S. and Japan on missile defense efforts. FM-9 was the sixth of a planned six flight test series within the missile defense Block 2004 time period, scheduled for the 2nd quarter of FY2004 as of February 2002. By February 2004 this test was scheduled for the 3rd quarter of FY2005.

    The 22 June 2006 test involved the launch of a Standard Missile 3 (SM-3 Block IA) from the USS Shiloh, an Aegis-class cruiser, modified to perform the ballistic missile defense mission, and a hit to kill intercept of a ”separating” target, meaning that the target warhead separated from its booster rocket. It was the seventh successful intercept test involving the sea-based component of the nation’s ballistic missile defense system in eight attempts. The missile successfully intercepted the target warhead outside the earth’s atmosphere more than 100 miles above the Pacific Ocean and 250 miles northwest of Kauai.

    FTM-11 Event 4 on 7 December 2006 was a no-test, resulting in a re-schedule. The planned sea-based missile intercept test scheduled for today by the Missile Defense Agency and the U.S. Navy was not completed due to an incorrect system setting aboard the Aegis-class cruiser USS Lake Erie which prevented the fire control system aboard the ship from launching the first of the two interceptor missiles. FTM-11 was completed 26 April 2007 by the Aegis BMD cruiser USS Lake Erie (CG 70). FTM-11 was the 4th Objective flight test to verify BMD 3.6 engagement capability with a near simultaneous multiple engagement and intercept of one low exo-atmospheric Group A (SRBM) target using an SM-3 Block IA missile, and a BQM-74 aerial target using an SM-2 Block IIIA missile. Conducted FTM-12 flight test to verify BMD 3.6 engagement capability with an intercept of a Group B (MRBM) target with an Integrated Reactive Lethality Payload (IRLP) using an SM-3 Block IA missile. The SM-3 intercept occurred approximately 100 miles above the Pacific Ocean and 250 miles northwest of Kauai.

    Flight Test Standard Missile -12 (FTM-12) on 22 June 2007 marked the ninth successful intercept in eleven flight tests for the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense Program. FM-12 was scheduled for the 2nd quarter of FY2005 as of February 2002. By February 2004 this test was scheduled for the 4th quarter of FY2006. The test involved a “separating” target, meaning that the target warhead separated from its booster rocket. The USS Decatur (DDG 73), using the operationally-certified Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense Weapon System (BMD 3.6) and the Standard Missile – 3 (SM-3) Block IA missile successfully intercepted the target during its midcourse phase of flight. The USS Decatur’s crew launched the SM-3, and two minutes later the missile successfully intercepted the target warhead outside the earth’s atmosphere more than 100 miles above the Pacific Ocean and 250 miles northwest of Kauai. FTM-12 flight test verified BMD 3.6 engagement capability with an intercept of a Group B target using an SM-3 Block IA missile.

    Flight Test Standard Missile-13 (FTM-13) on 06 November 2007 marked the tenth and eleventh successful intercepts, of thirteen targets in twelve scheduled flight tests for the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense Program. FM-13 was scheduled for the 3rd quarter of FY2005 as of February 2002. By February 2004 this test was scheduled for the 2nd quarter of FY2007. The mission was completed by the cruiser USS Lake Erie (CG 70), using the tactically certified 3.6 Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense shipboard weapon system and the Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) Block IA interceptor. At approximately 6:12 p.m. Hawaii Standard Time (11:12 p.m. EST), a target was launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Kauai, Hawaii. Moments later, a second, identical target was launched from the PMRF. The USS Lake Erie’s Aegis BMD Weapon System detected and tracked the targets and developed fire control solutions. Approximately two minutes later, the USS Lake Erie’s crew fired two SM-3 missiles, and two minutes later they successfully intercepted the targets outside the earth’s atmosphere more than 100 miles above the Pacific Ocean and 250 miles northwest of Kauai.

    The JFTM-1 test event on 18 December 2007 verified the new engagement capability of the Aegis BMD configuration of the recently upgraded Japanese destroyer, JS KONGO (DDG-173). At approximately 12:05 pm (HST), 7:05 am Tokyo time on Dec. 18, 2007, a ballistic missile target was launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Barking Sands, Kauai, Hawaii. JS KONGO crew members detected and tracked the target. The Aegis Weapon System then developed a fire control solution and at approximately 12:08 pm (HST), 7:08 am Tokyo time, a Standard Missile -3 (SM-3) Block IA was launched. Approximately 3 minutes later, the SM-3 successfully intercepted the target approximately 100 miles above the Pacific Ocean. The flight marked eleven intercepts in twelve attempts.
     
  9. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
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    Explain how the SAT is cold.
     
  10. ccheese

    ccheese Member In Perpetuity
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  11. wilbur1

    wilbur1 Active Member

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    No charles just um heh uh havin fun:lol:
     
  12. drgondog

    drgondog Well-Known Member

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    Nice summary EM!
     
  13. DBII

    DBII Active Member

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    I'm surprised that Green Peace did not Muck it Up with a lawyer.

    DBII
     
  14. Glider

    Glider Well-Known Member

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    My guess is that they beat then to the draw. There was a report here a few days ago and the clear message was that the shot would take place in the next 8-10 weeks when the US had a good opportunity. I was very surprised (and pleased) to hear that they shot it down so quickly.
     
  15. SoD Stitch

    SoD Stitch Banned

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    Yes, I would guess it was quite the opposite; compared to the cold of the space surrounding it, it would seem the satellite was a relatively "warm" target, comparatively speaking. Even a "dead" satellite would radiate more heat than the empty space surrounding it.

    Moving on, how many people here (besides me) suspect there was more to this than the government let on? According to several experts, the actual hazard the satellite posed to humanity with it's 100 lbs. or so of hydrazine on-board was extremely small; even assuming it came down in a relatively populated area (highly unlikely to begin with), it would not have posed a serious health risk to anybody, unless it hit them on the head. My guess is the US Gov't wanted to show the world (especially China) in a very public way that we have the means of taking out any satellite of our choosing.

    There is also talk that the US Gov't didn't want parts of their top-secret satellite showing up on eBay, where anybody (including the Chinese the Russians) could buy (supposedly) top-secret technology. IMHO, whatever pieces did make it to earth probably would've been burned beyong recognition, even assuming anything made it back to earth in one piece.
     
  16. evangilder

    evangilder "Shooter"
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    There is always a risk of something sensitive getting out, and I think that was one of the concerns. But there was about 100 gallons, not pounds, of hydrazine on board, and that would cause some damage.
    Now imagine that coming down into an area of a country that we are not on good terms with, or maybe we are. It could be speculated that the satellite was deliberately aimed there. Likely? No, but that wouldn't stop propagandists and conspiracy nuts from coming up with something.

    The are of contamination would be about 2 football fields. Landing in the middle of the desert somewhere would be no big deal, but what if it landed in the middle of say, downtown Los Angeles?
     
  17. Bernhart

    Bernhart <b>2012 Forum Fantasy Football Champion</ b>

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    agree with SOd stitch, figure it was agreat way to show that they can hit satellites while in space.
     
  18. Evil_Merlin

    Evil_Merlin Member

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    As was said before its not 100lbs of hydrazine, its half a TON of hydrazine.


    Anyways, people, stop believing the liberal media. Thats what they want you to think, in reality, both the Russians and the Chinese know that the US has had the ability to run ASAT missions since the introduction of the ASM-135 in 1984 (almost 15 years ago). In 1985 the ASM-135 was launched by an F-15 and competely destroyed the P78-1 Solwind sat, showing without a doubt that the US could easily take a sat out of its choosing a long time ago.
     
  19. SoD Stitch

    SoD Stitch Banned

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    I stand corrected on my facts (or lack thereof!). Obviously, I misheard (or mis-remembered; more likely at my advanced age!) the "100 gallons" as "100 lbs."; my mistake . . . . but I still think there's more behind it than simply "interest for the public's safety". As I said, the chances of it actually coming down in a populated area were extremely remote to begin with. I guess we'll never know the truth . . . .
     
  20. wilbur1

    wilbur1 Active Member

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    Merlin you think like i do it was 24 years ago you old fart!:D
     
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