Breda in Spain and USSR

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by Jan den Das, Apr 3, 2015.

  1. Jan den Das

    Jan den Das Member

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    Hai

    During my inquiry I found the information:
    1 Breda Ba.64 to Spain
    2.Breda Ba.64 and Ba.65 to USSR

    Who can give any information concerning there history and further pictures/colors would be interresting?

    Thanks
    Jan
     
  2. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

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    From Wiki:

    Production aircraft were sent to 5° and 50° Stormos but pilots considered them ill-equipped to undertake missions as a bomber or fighter. The faults including being underpowered, heavy handling characteristics and a tendency to enter high-speed stalls that led to a number of fatal crashes. After limited use in front-line service, the Ba.64s were relegated to second-line duties although a small number survived until March 1943.

    Two Ba.64s were exported by the Soviet Union in 1938 while a single example saw brief service in June 1937 during the Spanish Civil War with Nationalist forces in the Aviazione Legionaria.

    Breda_64_monoplano.jpg
     
  3. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

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    The Soviets never had a Ba.65. This was originally reported via Wiki but it was actually one of the ones from Chile.

    In regards to Russian Ba.64 I cannot find this in any of my books, only the internet. During this time the Soviets were buying a number of aircraft from foreign nations to evaluate so it is possible.
     
  4. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

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    According to Aircraft of the Spanish Civil War by Gerald Howson, the USSR purchased two Breda 64s in 1938, but nothing more is added. One Ba 64 arrived in Spain in 1937 with the Aviazione Legionara from Italy in June 1937 and it received the military serial 8-1, but no more is said about that either - similar info to what Greg has already posted. There is quite a bit of information on the Breda 65 in Spain, a total of 23 were sent and 12 were lost, the Republicans might have shot down either three or six of them - records are conflicting; the 11 survivors entered Ejercito del Aire service after the war ended.
     
  5. Capt. Vick

    Capt. Vick Well-Known Member

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    Here is a Ba 65 in Nationalist markings...

    Ba_65.PNG
     
  6. Koopernic

    Koopernic Active Member

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    The cockpit is extraordinarily far forward, towards the engine, compared to most WW2 designs and even WW1 designs. I imagine it assisted visibility to some degree. What designe factors drove this?
     
  7. Capt. Vick

    Capt. Vick Well-Known Member

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    Weight balance (c/g) to balance out bombs and rear gunner on 65?
     
  8. tyrodtom

    tyrodtom Well-Known Member

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    it wouldn't be smart to use a non-removable weight ( pilot) to counterbalance removable weight ( bombs).

    Bombs are usually carried as close to the c/g as possible, so you don't have a large c/g change when they're dropped.
     
  9. Capt. Vick

    Capt. Vick Well-Known Member

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    True...but the Italians were so passionate about their bombs they hardly liked to drop them! :lol:
     
  10. Elmas

    Elmas Active Member

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    Bombs are expensive, they can be used only in the grandest occasion.....
     
  11. Capt. Vick

    Capt. Vick Well-Known Member

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    Exactly! Ciao!
     
  12. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

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    Probably visibility, as you mentioned, Koopernic. It had a rather stalky undercarriage, which might have necessitated the close proximity of the cockpit to the nose. Note that it is roughly in line with the wing leading edge. The 65 had space for a second cockpit aft of the pilot's. The Ba 64 had a similar forward cockpit layout, and it was designed as a fighter/light bomber/attack aircraft. Nice and warm for the pilot flying in a Mediterranean environment.
     
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