Lego engines

cammerjeff

Senior Airman
378
730
Dec 26, 2006
I know they made 11 Cylinder Aircraft Rotary engines, and I have seen large 11 cylinder industrial Radial engines. But I have never heard of a 13 cylinder single row radial engine. Happy to learn if there was such an engine built.
 

Dash119

Senior Airman
522
388
Aug 9, 2019
Granada Hills, CA
I would think the crowding together of 13 cylinders in a single row would be problematic. At some point there just isn't enough room between the cylinders. Unless you use really long connecting rods and increase the overall diameter of the engine.
 

Shortround6

Major General
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Jun 29, 2009
Central Florida Highlands
Wright tried making a 22 cylinder two row.
wright-r-4090-front.jpg


See Wright Aeronautical R-4090 Cyclone 22 Aircraft Engine
 

swampyankee

Chief Master Sergeant
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2,856
Jun 25, 2013
Nordberg made 11 and 12 cylinder, two-stoke radial diesels. These were liquid cooled.

I suspect that 13-cylinder radials weren't tried because it was considered easier to just make a two row radial with fourteen cylinders.
 

Admiral Beez

1st Lieutenant
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Oct 21, 2019
Toronto, Canada
Whoops, I miscounted. Looks like there’s 12 cylinders on the radial. As I understand it that’s nearly impossible, except for two-strokes and diesels.
 
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SaparotRob

Unter Gemeine Geschwader Murmeltier XIII
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Mar 12, 2020
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I was thinking that myself. It reminded me of the diagrams of steam engines showing the way steam moves through both sides of a cylinder to operate. I went through a brief railfan period.
 

Admiral Beez

1st Lieutenant
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Oct 21, 2019
Toronto, Canada
The air powered lego engine is like a double acting steam engine. Each stroke is a power stroke so an even number of cylinders works just fine. It isn't even a two stroke, it is really a one stroke...
I often think these air powered "engines" are nothing of the sort. If it's an engine it should be generating power, not consuming it.
 

Dash119

Senior Airman
522
388
Aug 9, 2019
Granada Hills, CA
A conventional engine converts one form of energy into another, so does the Lego engine. If you attached a propellor to the Lego engine, it would be generating thrust. I'm not seeing much difference...
 

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