OK, Time To Buy a 1/32nd F4U Corsair....

Discussion in 'Questions on Kits, Decals, Tools and Pilots' started by lesofprimus, Feb 11, 2009.

  1. lesofprimus

    lesofprimus Active Member

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    Alright fellas, I know we talked alittle about which kit this and that, but this is where I listen to my more experienced colleauges' opinions....

    Which kit is the best kit fellas??? Price wants to be under $75.00 delivered...
     
  2. lesofprimus

    lesofprimus Active Member

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    Looks like 3 choices on EBay...

    REVELL 1/32 CORSAIR F4U-1 1970
    Trumpeter 1/32 Vought F4U-4
    Hobbycraft 1/32 F4U-1D Corsair

    I really want to do the -1 version to recreate a VMF-214 kite, flown in Sept, 1943....
     
  3. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Not really my field Dan, but I'd guess the Hasegawa kit would be a good option. It should be around that sort of price in the USA, as it's about £30 here in England I believe.
    Probably Cory or Wayne would know more I should think.
    EDIT: Posts crossed. The Revell kit, although old and a little basic by today's standards, can be made into a very good model. I've seen some first hand that looked superb, and recently saw a build, I think on either Hyper Scale or Cyber Model, that pointed out the shortcomings. I know there's a lot of room for scratch-built detailing work.
     
  4. lesofprimus

    lesofprimus Active Member

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    Didnt see a 1/32 Hasegawa Corsair anywhere Terry....
     
  5. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Ah! Maybe discontinued again. I'll have a look on some UK sited for you Dan, and let you know.
     
  6. Catch22

    Catch22 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, the Hasegawa kit is no longer in production, it would be nice if they came out with a re-tooled kit.

    I'll echo what Terry said about the Revell kit, it IS basic, and has raised panel lines, but we have 3 built up in the house, and it does look good once completed.

    The Hobbycraft is apparently a reboxing of the new Trumpeter Corsair kit, which I have sitting downstairs and will be doing for the GB. Now, it's a nice kit, but not cheap, though it should sneak under your price limit Dan as it was $75 CND. There are some things wrong with it, such as the front landing gear doors are COMPLETELY wrong, so you'll have to scratch-build them. You may want to fix the shape of the holes in the wing where those close up into, but that's going to be much more difficult. I think the overall shape of it is good otherwise though. The other main problem are the ejector pin marks that seem to be everywhere. The cockpit also has a floor, but I'd just paint it black and it will disappear. If you get it in the Hobbycraft boxing, send me the Sheppard decals. :lol:

    I'll stay away from the -4 as I really have no experience with it, but I would imagine many of the same things are wrong with it as the -1, but it's still nice.

    I personally would go with the Trumpeter (Hobbycraft in your case) kit, as you'll be astonished when you open it and see the engine, which, while fragile, is VERY, VERY, VERY detailed.
     
  7. Catch22

    Catch22 Well-Known Member

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    Also, sorry for the double post, the 21st Century Toys one, while basic, is still quite good. That's if you can find one.
     
  8. lesofprimus

    lesofprimus Active Member

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    Cant find one yet Cory... Thanks for replying....
     
  9. Catch22

    Catch22 Well-Known Member

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    No problem.
     
  10. evangilder

    evangilder "Shooter"
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    I would imagine with that new airbrush, it will be real nice.
     
  11. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

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    Can't help on this one Dan not a Corsair expert...but the Trumpeter one reviewed by Brett Green looks the goods...
     
  12. lesofprimus

    lesofprimus Active Member

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    Thanks guys....
     
  13. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    I've checked everywhere here Dan. There IS one Hasegawa kit available, through one of those places that deals in out-of-production/rare kits etc, but he's asking £50 for it, plus shipping! That'd be around $100 to $120 delivered!
    I don't think so!
     
  14. lesofprimus

    lesofprimus Active Member

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    Ugh Terry.....

    Found 4 -1A's that Grandpa could have flown, theres a couple more out there, including the couple polular ones Boyington flew....

    Bu no.
    17679
    17844
    56016
    55879

    Question:
    Is this kit able to convert to a -1A???? Are the parts supplied in the kit???
    TRUMPETER 1/32 VOUGHT F4U-1D CORSAIR MODEL KIT FIGHTER
    [​IMG]
     
  15. Catch22

    Catch22 Well-Known Member

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    Dan, there's noting to be supplied. The only differences really were ADDED to the -1D, so just don't put the drop tank or rocket pylons on and you're good to go.

    Reading week is almost here, so I'll get the -1 completely done in my guide very soon.
     
  16. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    F4U-1 (Corsair Mk I Fleet Air Arm): The first production version of the Corsair with the original cockpit seat height and "bird cage" canopy. The differences over the XF4U-1 were as follows:

    Six .50 cal Browning AN/M2 machine guns were fitted in the outer wing panels, displacing fuel tanks.
    An enlarged 237 U.S. gallon (897 liter) fuel tank was fitted ahead of the cockpit, in place of the fuselage armament. The cockpit was moved back by 32 inches.
    The fuselage was lengthened from 31 ft 11 in (9.7 m) to 33 ft 4 in (10.1 m).
    The more powerful R-2800-8 Double Wasp was fitted.
    150 lbs of armor plate was fitted to the cockpit and a 1.5 inch bullet-resistant glass screen was fitted behind the curved windscreen.
    IFF transponder equipment was fitted.
    Curved transparent panels were incorporated into the fuselage behind the pilot's headrest.
    The flaps were changed from deflector type to NACA slotted.
    The span of the ailerons was increased while that of the flaps was decreased.
    A land-based version for the USMC, without the folding wing capability, was built by Goodyear under the designation FG-1. In Fleet Air Arm service the F4U-1 was given the name Corsair Mk I. Vought also built a single -1 two-seat trainer; the Navy showed no interest.

    F4U-1A (Corsair Mk II): The designation F4U-1A does not appear in lists of Corsair Bureau Numbers and was not in official use, being applied post-war to differentiate mid to late production F4U-1s from the early production variant.[93][22]. Mid to late production Corsairs incorporated a new, taller and wider clear-view canopy with only two frames, along with a simplified clear view windscreen. The cockpit seat was raised seven inches which, with the wider canopy top section, allowed the pilot better visibility over the long nose. The Plexiglas rear-view windows as well as the one under the cockpit were omitted. The tailwheel strut was lengthened, which also aided the pilot's forward view. These Corsairs were the first "carrier capable" variant and introduced a six inch long stall strip just outboard of the gun ports on the starboard wing leading edge and improved undercarriage oleo struts which eliminated bouncing on landing. F4U-1s supplied to the USMC lacked arrester hooks and the tail wheels were changed to a smaller diameter solid rubber type.[94] Additionally, an experimental R-2800-8W engine with water injection was fitted on one of the late F4U-1As. After satisfactory results, many F4U-1As were fitted with the new powerplant. The aircraft carried 237 U.S. gallons (897 l) in the main fuel tank, located in front of the cockpit, as well as an unarmored, non-self-sealing 62 U.S. gallon (235 l) fuel tank in each wing. This version of the Corsair was the first to be able to carry a drop tank under the center-section. With drop tanks fitted, the fighter had a maximum ferry range of just over 1,500 mi. (2,425 km).

    A land-based version, without the folding wing capability, was built by Goodyear as the FG-1A. In British service, the aircraft type was modified with "clipped" wings (8 inches was cut off each wingtip) for use on British aircraft carriers, under the designation Corsair Mk II.

    F3A-1 (Corsair Mk. III):This was the designation for the Brewster built F4U-1. Just over 700 were built before Brewster was forced out of business. Poor production techniques and shabby quality control meant that these aircraft were red-lined for speed and prohibited from aerobatics after several lost their wings. This was later traced to poor quality wing fittings. None of the Brewster built Corsairs reached front-line units.

    F4U-1B: This was an unofficial post-war designation used to identify F4U-1s modified for FAA use.

    F4U-1C: The prototype F4U-1C, BuNo50277, appeared in August 1943 and was based on an F4U-1. 200 of this variant were built from July through to November 1944: all were based on the F4U-1D and were built in parallel with that variant. Intended for ground-attack as well as fighter missions, the F4U-1C was similar to the F4U-1D but its armament was replaced by four 20 mm (0.79") AN/M2 cannons, each containing 231 rounds[96] of ammunition. The F4U-1C was introduced to combat during 1945, most notably in the Okinawa campaign. Aviators preferred the standard armament of six .50 caliber machine guns since they were already more than powerful enough to destroy most Japanese aircraft, and had more ammunition and a higher rate of fire. The weight of the Hispano cannons and their ammunition affected the flight performance, especially its agility, but the aircraft was found to be especially potent in the ground attack role.


    F4U-1D (Corsair Mk IV): Built in parallel with the F4U-1C, but was introduced in April 1944. It had the new -8W water-injection engine. This change gave the aircraft up to 250 hp (187 kW) more power, which, in turn, increased performance. Speed, for example, was boosted from 417 mph (671 km/h) to 425 mph (684 km/h). Because of the U.S. Navy's need for fighter-bombers, it had a payload of rockets double the -1A's, as well as twin-rack plumbing for an additional belly drop tank. Such modifications necessitated the need for rocket tabs (attached to fully metal-plated underwing surfaces) and bomb pylons to be bolted on the fighter, however, causing extra drag. Additionally, the new job of fighter-bombing was a new task for the Corsair and the wing fuel cells proved too vulnerable and were removed.[citation needed] The extra fuel carried by the two drop tanks would still allow the aircraft to fly relatively long missions despite the heavy, un-aerodynamic load. The regular armament of six machine guns were implemented as well. The canopies of most -1Ds had their struts removed along with their metal caps, which were used — at one point — as a measure to prevent the canopies' glass from cracking as they moved along the fuselage spines of the fighters. Also, the clear-view style "Malcolm Hood" canopy used initially on Supermarine Spitfire and P-51C Mustang aircraft was adopted as standard equipment for the -1D model, and all later F4U production aircraft. Additional production was carried out by Goodyear (FG-1D) and Brewster (F3A-1D). In Fleet Air Arm service, the former was known as , the latter as Corsair III, and both had their wingtips clipped by 8" per wing to allow storage in the small confines of British carriers.

    PS. I've the Kagero Volume I about the Corsair Dan, in it there's a set of decals, 1/72, 1/48 and 1/32. 883 with Navy Serial 17883 is on that set. If you want I can cut that one off and send it to you...
     
  17. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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  18. lesofprimus

    lesofprimus Active Member

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    Sounds like the same decal set as the one I was thinking of buying Jan... Officially designated to Bob McClurg, it is said that Boyington also flew 883, in November 1943, which means everyone and their brother flew it if McClurg wasnt in it...

    I appreciate the offer Jan, but I would want to get the whole decal setup with the red bordered star and bars etc etc... Still hoping someone will come up with some sqaurdon info concerning the different assigned #'s for -214 in October....
     
  19. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    Anytime buddy!
     
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