Ta152-H1 uber-fighter?

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Yes it is a better replacement and was meant for all NATO countries.

The AIM-120 Advanced Medium-Range, Air-to-Air Missile, or AMRAAM (pronounced am-ram), commonly known to air crews as the 'Slammer,' is a new generation air-to-air missile, developed as the result of an agreement between the United States and other NATO countries (see below). Its eastern counterpart is the very similar Russian R-77 AA-12 Adder, commonly known in the west as "Amraamski".

The AMRAAM has an all-weather, beyond-visual-range capability. It improves the aerial combat capabilities of U.S. and allied aircraft to meet the future threat of enemy air-to-air weapons. AMRAAM serves as a follow-on to the AIM-7 Sparrow missile series. The new missile is faster, smaller, and lighter, and has improved capabilities against low-altitude targets. It also incorporates an active radar in conjunction with an inertial reference unit and micro-computer system, which makes the missile less dependent upon the fire-control system of the aircraft. Once the missile closes in on the target, its active radar guides it to intercept. This feature, called "fire and forget", frees the pilot from the need to continuously illuminate the missile's target with a radar lock, enabling the pilot to aim and fire several missiles simultaneously at multiple targets and perform evasive maneuvers while the missiles guide themselves to the targets.

The AIM-120 grew out of an agreement, no longer in effect, among the United States and several other NATO nations to develop air-to-air missiles and to share production technology. Under this agreement the U.S. was to develop the next generation medium range missile (AMRAAM) and Europe would develop the next generation short range missile (ASRAAM). The breakdown in this agreement lead to Europe developing the MBDA Meteor, a competitor to AMRAAM and the U.S. pursuing upgrades of the AIM-9 Sidewinder. After protracted development, deployment of AMRAAM (AIM-120A) began in September 1991.

There are currently three variants of AMRAAM, all in service with the USAF and USN. The AIM-120A is no longer in production and shares the enlarged wings and fins with the successor AIM-120B currently in production. The AIM-120C has smaller 'clipped' aerosurfaces to enable internal carriage on the USAF F/A-22 Raptor. AIM-120B deliveries began in 1994, and AIM-120C deliveries began in 1996.

The AIM-120C has been steadily upgraded since it was introduced. The AIM-120C-6 contained an improved fuze (Target Detection Device) compared to its predecessor. The AIM-120C-7 development begain in 1998 and included improvements in homing and greater range (actual amount of improvement unspecified). It was successfully tested in 2003 and is currently being introduced into active service (early 2005). It helps the U.S. Navy replace the F-14 Tomcats which are being retired and replaced with F/A-18E/F Super Hornets - the loss of the F-14's long-range AIM-54 Phoenix missiles can be partially offset with a longer-range AMRAAM.

The AIM-120D is a planned upgraded version of the AMRAAM with improvements in almost all areas, including 50% greater range and better guidance over its entire flight envelope yielding an improved kill probabiliy (PK). There are also plans for Raytheon to develop a Ramjet-powered deriviative of the AMRAAM called the FMRAAM. It is not known whether the FMRAAM will be produced since the British Ministry of Defence has chosen the Meteor missile over the FMRAAM as its preference for a BVR missile for the Eurofighter Typhoon aircraft.

Function Medium-range, air-to-air tactical missile
Contractor Hughes/Raytheon
Unit cost USD 386,000 (2003); USD 299,000 (price for Lot 12 contract in April 1998; the previous price in Lot 11 was USD 340,000 each)

Engine High performance, directed rocket motor
Launch mass 152 kg
Length 3.66 m
Diameter 177.8 mm
Wing span 525.8 mm (AIM-120A/B)
Speed Supersonic
Range over 32 km
Flying altitude N/A
Warhead Blast Fragmentation; high explosive
Guidance
Fuzes
Launch platform Aircrafts
Germany: F-4
Norway: F-16A/B
UK: Panavia Tornado and Eurofighter Typhoon (Royal Air Force), Sea Harrier (Fleet Air Arm)
US Marine Corps: AV-8B+, F/A-18
US Navy: F-14D, F/A-18
US Air Force: F-15, F-16, F/A-22
Republic of Singapore Air Force: F-16C/D, Upgraded F-5S/T
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AIM-120_AMRAAM
 
DerAdlerIstGelandet said:
RG_Lunatic said:
71 Sparrows were fired in Desert Storm for 26 kills. In most cases, two or more missiles were fired against each target, with an interval between firing, so the 37% hit ratio is misleadingly low.

Against low flying fighters it is not the best missile, especially the earlier versions. Against high flying bombers, the orginal intended target, its a great missile and has been since the early 60's. I'll do some more research on this when I have more time.

=S=

Lunatic

If it truely is such a good missle then why did they have to fire 2 or more missles at each target, that would actually confirm to me that its success rate was quite low.

Why not fire more than one? One missile can be evaded, but that usually makes evading the 2nd missile nearly impossible.

Who's missiles were better????

=S=

Lunatic
 
RG_Lunatic said:
DerAdlerIstGelandet said:
RG_Lunatic said:
71 Sparrows were fired in Desert Storm for 26 kills. In most cases, two or more missiles were fired against each target, with an interval between firing, so the 37% hit ratio is misleadingly low.

Against low flying fighters it is not the best missile, especially the earlier versions. Against high flying bombers, the orginal intended target, its a great missile and has been since the early 60's. I'll do some more research on this when I have more time.

=S=

Lunatic

If it truely is such a good missle then why did they have to fire 2 or more missles at each target, that would actually confirm to me that its success rate was quite low.

Why not fire more than one? One missile can be evaded, but that usually makes evading the 2nd missile nearly impossible.

Who's missiles were better????

=S=

Lunatic

Well the Iraqis certainly did not have anything that compared, they had outdated Russian and French missles just like the aircraft that carried them and there crews were undertrained. The average Iraqi pilot recieved less then 50 flight hours a year in training. So you can not compare American Missles with Iraqi. Sorry cant do it that is already onesided. As for missles that are just as good or better I have already made a list of them in my other recent post including AMRAMM, which was made to replace the AIM-7.
 
I agree.

So what other missiles in the 60's-70's timeframe were better?

=S=

Lunatic
 
No I will agree with you that in 60's to 70's timeframe it was the best missle of its type. However I think the AIM-54 Pheonix was the best air to air missle period. Its only downfall was that only the F-14 Tomcat could fire it.
 
The Phoenix was great for intercepting steady, unmanouverable aircraft at a set altitude...... In a multitude of targets, simulatneously.....

However, at a $1,000,000 dollars a shot, it was very expensive..... I have a whole book on the test firing of a 6 shot drone attack.....

It has been found that an agile fighter such as the Mig-29 type could successfully evade this missle with ease...

The AMRAMM is a much better weap in my opinion...
 
The Red Top was hard to shake, but only had a 7 mile range. Then, it is a short range missile, the sparrow was medium. The AIM-9 is short range and before the L, I believe inferior to the Red Top.

The British had the BAe Sky Flash in place of the Sparrow
 
plan_D said:
The Red Top was hard to shake, but only had a 7 mile range. Then, it is a short range missile, the sparrow was medium. The AIM-9 is short range and before the L, I believe inferior to the Red Top.

The British had the BAe Sky Flash in place of the Sparrow

The Firestreak came out in 1958, had a minimum range just shy of 2 miles, a max range of about 5 miles. It weighted ~300 lbs.

The Redtop came out in 1964, had a 16.5 mile max. range and weighed 330 lbs.

The early Sidewinder AIM-9B entered service in 1956 and had a range of just 3 miles, but min range was extremely close. Various models were introduced at least through the D by the late 50's and the E by the mid 60's. This was followed by the G and H models in the early 70's, and then we get to more modern models. Range on the D E verision is about 10 miles. Weight is only about 180 lbs, almost half that of the Redtop.

=S=

Lunatic
 
Weight of the missile means nothing, weight of the warhead does. The Red Top had a range of 7 miles. It wasn't until the 80s AIM-9Ls that they became superior to the Red Top missile.

The Firestreak doesn't need to be mentioned because it was soon replaced by the Red Top, as there were many faults with the Firestreak. Although they can be forgiven, being a 50s design.
 
And how can really compare a short range missle to a medium or long range missle anyhow. Fighter in England and the United States carry both short and medium or long range so you really cant compare them.
 
Alright lets see if this siggy thing I made works in the posting.
 

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