Weird way (at least for me) to pronounce "Arkansas"...

Discussion in 'OFF-Topic / Misc.' started by Maestro, Nov 22, 2009.

  1. Maestro

    Maestro Active Member

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    Greetings ladies and gentlemen.

    I was watching that serie called "Dogfight" and something made me wonder... It all started with an American ace saying : "When I was a kid in Arkansas..."

    The thing is, he didn't pronounce it as I thought it had to be pronounced, "ArkansASS" (like "Texas"), but rather pronounced it "ArkansAW".

    My question is, was it only the accent, or do you guys realy pronounce it "ArkansAW" ? And before I sound retarded in front of any American, is there other states that aren't pronounced like they are written ?
     
  2. B-17engineer

    B-17engineer Active Member

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    You say ArkanSAW in all states. I don't know why but we just do :lol:
     
  3. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

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    ArkansAW, but Kansas is pronouced KansAS - go figure.

    The one town that has always befuddled me in pronouncing is Leceister. I always pronounced is as Lee - cester, but in North Carolina it's pronounced as Lester.
     
  4. RabidAlien

    RabidAlien Active Member

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    "Pedernales Falls"....pronounced "Per-duh-naal-is", not "Ped-er-naal-is".
     
  5. conkerking

    conkerking Member

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    ... but - it's Kans-ass, not kan-saw? :lol:

    We have have plenty of these in the UK

    Leicester = Lester
    Worcester = Wuster
    Bicester = Bister
    Southwell = Suthell
    Southwark = Sutheck
    Slaithwaite = Slawit
    Appletreewick = Aptrick
    Reading = Redding
     
  6. Maestro

    Maestro Active Member

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    Yep, speaking of which, I always thought that Kansas City was the capital of Kansas until I actually checked on a map. That city is in Missouri, dammit ! But it's an other story... ;)

    Oh, and thanks for answering my pronounciation question.
     
  7. Colin1

    Colin1 Active Member

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    #7 Colin1, Nov 23, 2009
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2009
    We've got a great big pile of those

    Cities
    Leicester - Lester
    Gloucester - Gloster
    Worcester - Wooster
    Bicester - Bister
    Towcester - Toaster

    Counties
    Derby - Darbyshire
    Berkshire - Barkshire

    lol sorry conkerking, I spent far too long dawdling around in post mode :)
     
  8. evangilder

    evangilder "Shooter"
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    When I first got to California, I had a heck of a time with some of the city names here. A great example is La Jolla, pronounce La Hoya.
     
  9. Amsel

    Amsel Active Member

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    #9 Amsel, Nov 23, 2009
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2009
    In Texas...

    Refugio- Re-FYER-ee-oh
    Palacios- Pah-LASH-us
    Balcones: Bal-CONE-niss
    Bonnell: Bun-NELL
    Dessau: DESS-aw
    Guadalupe: GWA-da-loop
    Koenig: KAY-nig
    Manchaca: MAN-shack
    Manor: MAY-ner
    Nueces: New-AY-sez
    Rio Grande: REE-oh Grand
    San Jacinto: San Jah-SIN-tow
    San Marcos: San MAR-kiss
     
  10. Amsel

    Amsel Active Member

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    Some more Texas pronunciations...

    Burnet: burn-it
    Llano: lanno
    Buda: byoo-duh (not Buddha)
    Llano Estacado: yah-no es-tuh-cah-doe
    Mexia: Muh-hay-uh
    Amarillo (the town): am-uh-rilla
    Plano: play-no
    Boerne: burny
    Pecan: pih-con’
    Gruene: green
     
  11. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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    I live in a county of - Gloucester, Colin! Some want to pronounce the 'C' as an "ch" sound. We say 'Glawster'.
     
  12. Colin1

    Colin1 Active Member

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    So that would come out Glo' - chester. Weird :)

    Is 'Glawster' a specific, regional dialect inflection? I always found Americans tend to turn the short 'o' into 'ar' eg Glarster or once upon a time, Carlin (me) :)
     
  13. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

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    That's wrong???? :lol:

    Heck I made fun of people in North Carolina pronouning Leicester as Lester only to find out today they were right.
     
  14. B-17engineer

    B-17engineer Active Member

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    Well some people from New Jersey say New Joy-see as opposed to New Jer-see

    People who live in Boston say Baw-stun

    New York City- I'm from New Yowk. Fagetaboutit - Forget about it in New York.
     
  15. B-17engineer

    B-17engineer Active Member

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    Here is why we differ in accents..

    While written AmE is standardized across the country, there are several recognizable variations in the spoken language, both in pronunciation and in vernacular vocabulary. General American is the name given to any American accent that is relatively free of noticeable regional influences.

    After the Civil War, the settlement of the western territories by migrants from the Eastern U.S. led to dialect mixing and leveling, so that regional dialects are most strongly differentiated along the Eastern seaboard. The Connecticut River and Long Island Sound is usually regarded as the southern/western extent of New England speech, which has its roots in the speech of the Puritans from East Anglia who settled in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. The Potomac River generally divides a group of Northern coastal dialects from the beginning of the Coastal Southern dialect area; in between these two rivers several local variations exist, chief among them the one that prevails in and around New York City and northern New Jersey, which developed on a Dutch substratum after the British conquered New Amsterdam. The main features of Coastal Southern speech can be traced to the speech of the English from the West Country who settled in Virginia after leaving England at the time of the English Civil War, and to the African influences from the African Americans who were enslaved in the South.

    Although no longer region-specific,[21] African American Vernacular English, which remains prevalent among African Americans, has a close relationship to Southern varieties of AmE and has greatly influenced everyday speech of many Americans.

    A distinctive speech pattern also appears near the border between Canada and the United States, centered on the Great Lakes region (but only on the American side). This is the Inland North Dialect—the "standard Midwestern" speech that was the basis for General American in the mid-20th Century (although it has been recently modified by the northern cities vowel shift). Those not from this area frequently confuse it with the North Midland dialect treated below, referring to both collectively as "Midwestern" in the mid-Atlantic region or "Northern" in the Southern US. The so-called '"Minnesotan" dialect is also prevalent in the cultural Upper Midwest, and is characterized by influences from the German and Scandinavian settlers of the region (yah for yes/ja in German, pronounced the same way).

    In the interior, the situation is very different. West of the Appalachian Mountains begins the broad zone of what is generally called "Midland" speech. This is divided into two discrete subdivisions, the North Midland that begins north of the Ohio River valley area, and the South Midland speech; sometimes the former is designated simply "Midland" and the latter is reckoned as "Highland Southern." The North Midland speech continues to expand westward until it becomes the closely related Western dialect which contains Pacific Northwest English as well as the well-known California English, although in the immediate San Francisco area some older speakers do not possess the cot-caught merger and thus retain the distinction between words such as cot and caught which reflects a historical Mid-Atlantic heritage.

    The South Midland or Highland Southern dialect follows the Ohio River in a generally southwesterly direction, moves across Arkansas and Oklahoma west of the Mississippi, and peters out in West Texas. It is a version of the Midland speech that has assimilated some coastal Southern forms (outsiders often mistakenly believe South Midland speech and coastal South speech to be the same).

    The island state of Hawaii has a distinctive Hawaiian Pidgin.

    Finally, dialect development in the United States has been notably influenced by the distinctive speech of such important cultural centers as Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Charleston, New Orleans, and Detroit, which imposed their marks on the surrounding areas.
     
  16. Colin1

    Colin1 Active Member

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    New England folk have a Norfolk accent?!?!
    That's just... unfortunate... :)
     
  17. B-17engineer

    B-17engineer Active Member

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  18. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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    Harrison, where did you get that info from?

    As funny as it sounds there is also a distinct difference in speech just between North and South in this here small state of New Jersey. The usual demarcation line is around Trenton and goes eastward across the state. Those in the south are influenced by Philadelphia while those in the North are influenced by New York. Hence the long drawn out vowels in the North while in the southern part of the state we tend to run words together - kinda like ole Dixie!

    "Djeet?" (Did you eat?)
    "Wonttu?" (Want to?)

    :)
     
  19. B-17engineer

    B-17engineer Active Member

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    Wikipedia, mind me :oops:
     
  20. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
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    #20 DerAdlerIstGelandet, Nov 25, 2009
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2009
    I have always pronounced it Arkansaw. Just the way it always has been for me.

    It is all just different dialects though. In the mountains of N. Carolina where I used to live "Did you eat? No. Would you like to? Alright!" would be pronounced:

    "Djeet? Naw. Yantoo? Aaiiight!"

    Then just look at Germany where I live. There are so many different dialects it is impossible to keep up with them. I speak Schwaebisch along with my wife and her family. The area we live in speaks Frankish.
     
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